Discovery News: Etruscan Inscription Reveals Name of Goddess

P. Gregory Warden

Discovery News: Etruscan Inscription Reveals Name of Goddess

Science news site Discovery News covered a new discovery from the SMU-sponsored dig at Poggio Colla, a key settlement in Italy for the ancient Etruscan civilization. Archaeologists previously found a 2500-year-old slab in the foundation of a monumental temple at the dig, and have determined now that sacred text on the stele, as it's called, mentions the name "Uni," an Etruscan fertility goddess.

Daily Mail: Did the Etruscans follow a fertility cult? Inscribed stone slab reveals mysteries of ancient Italian civilisation

Science reporter Richard Gray covered a new discovery from the SMU-sponsored dig at Poggio Colla, a key settlement in Italy for the ancient Etruscan civilization. Archaeologists previously found a 2500-year-old slab in the foundation of a monumental temple at the dig, and have determined now that sacred text on the stele, as it's called, mentions the name "Uni," an Etruscan fertility goddess. The article, "Did the Etruscans follow a fertility cult? Inscribed stone slab reveals mysteries of ancient Italian civilisation," published in the Daily Mail Online Aug. 25.

Live Science: Goddess’s Name Inscribed in Lost Language on Ancient Tablet

Science reporter Stephanie Pappas covered a new discovery from the SMU-sponsored dig at Poggio Colla, a key settlement in Italy for the ancient Etruscan civilization. Archaeologists previously found a 2500-year-old slab in the foundation of a monumental temple at the dig, and have determined now that sacred text on the stele, as it's called, mentions the name "Uni," an Etruscan fertility goddess. The article, "Goddess's Name Inscribed in Lost Language on Ancient Tablet," published Aug. 26.

One of the most significant Etruscan discoveries in decades names female goddess Uni

Etruscan, stele, Uni, goddess, Poggio Colla, Italy, Gregory Warden, SMU, Mugello Valley ProjectArchaeologists translating a very rare inscription on an ancient Etruscan temple stone have discovered the name Uni — an important female goddess. The discovery indicates that Uni — a divinity of fertility — may have been the titular deity worshipped at the sanctuary of Poggio Colla, a key settlement in Italy for the ancient Etruscan civilization, said archaeologist Gregory Warden at SMU, main sponsor of the archaeological dig.

CNN: 2500-year-old slab reveals lost language

A team of scientists have uncovered a 2,500-year-old slab that may reveal details about the ancient Etruscan civilization. For more information To book a live or taped interview with Gregory Warden, call SMU News, 214-768-7654, or email news@smu.edu. Related links Gregory Warden Poggio Colla Field School Warden at SMU Etruscan exhibit at SMU's Meadows Museum [...]

TECH Insider: Archaeologists just discovered sacred text in mysterious language on a 2,500-year-old stone

Video journalist Grace Raver at TECH Insider covered SMU-sponsored research at Italy's Poggio Colla site where archaeologists have found what may be rare sacred text in the lost language of the Etruscans. The text is inscribed on a large 6th century BC sandstone slab and could reveal name of the god or goddess that was worshipped at the site.

Discovery News: Etruscan Inscription Offers Rare Clue to Mysterious People

inscriptions.jpg__800x600_q85_cropScience reporter Rossella Lorenzi Fox News segment "Digging History" covered SMU sponsored research at Italy's Poggio Colla site where archaeologists have found what may be rare sacred text in the lost language of the Etruscans. The text is inscribed on a large 6th century BC sandstone slab and could reveal name of the god or goddess that was worshipped at the site.

Fox News: 2,500-year old slab unearthed, offers glimpse into the ancient Etruscan world

inscriptions.jpg__800x600_q85_cropThe Fox News segment "Digging History" covered SMU sponsored research at Italy's Poggio Colla site where archaeologists have found what may be rare sacred text in the lost language of the Etruscans. The text is inscribed on a large 6th century BC sandstone slab and could reveal name of the god or goddess that was worshipped at the site.

Smithsonian: 2,500-Year-Old Monument Could Help Crack the Mysterious Etruscan Language

inscriptions.jpg__800x600_q85_cropScience reporter Jason Daley with Smithsonian covered SMU sponsored research at Italy's Poggio Colla site where archaeologists have found what may be rare sacred text in the lost language of the Etruscans. The text is inscribed on a large 6th century BC sandstone slab and could reveal name of the god or goddess that was worshipped at the site.

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