How Stuff Works: Could Humans Break the Two-hour Marathon Barrier?

Plants & Animals

How Stuff Works: Could Humans Break the Two-hour Marathon Barrier?

How Stuff Works reporter Julia Layton tapped the expertise of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for a news story about the burning question of the limits of human speed and whether — or when — runners will break the two-hour marathon barrier. Weyand explained the biomechanics of human locomotion, particularly as it pertains to fast [...]

Science.mic: Usain Bolt’s Winning Race at the Rio Olympics, Explained by Science

Journalist Kelly Dickerson referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog Science.Mic examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Dickerson quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "Usain Bolt's Winning Race at the Rio Olympics, Explained by Science" published Aug. 15, 2016.

The Globe and Mail: In perfect asymmetry

Journalist Rachel Brady referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog The Roar examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Porter quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "In perfect asymmetry" published Aug. 18, 2016.

The Roar: Humans can’t bolt much faster than Usain — What science says about the 100m world record

Sports writer Matt Porter referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog The Roar examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Porter quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "Humans can't bolt much faster than Usain: What science says about the 100m world record" published Aug. 15, 2016.

Textbook theory of how humans populated America is “biologically unviable,” study finds

The established theory of how Ice Age peoples first reached the present-day United States is now challenged by an unprecedented study that concludes that entry route was “biologically unviable.” The North American ice-free corridor, thought to have been used by the first colonizers, only became biologically viable 12,600 years ago — after they would have arrived. Researchers suggest a Pacific coast was the entry route.

Scientific American: The Secret to Human Speed — “To sprint like a pro, think like a piston.”

Peter Weyand, human speed, Scientific American, SMU, elite sprinters, speed, biomechanicsThe work of SMU biomechanics researcher Peter G. Weyand is featured in the August 2016 issue of the science news magazine Scientific American. Science writer and associate editor Dina Fine Maron reports on Weyand's leading-edge research about the key to human speed for sprinters in the article "The Secret to Human Speed" and the video report "How Elite Sprinters Run So Fast."

KERA: Thanks To CT Scans, Scientists Know A Lot About Texas’ Pawpawsaurus Dinosaur

"There's no relationship between dinosaurs and armadillos, which are mammals, but it is interesting that something that looked like an armadillo was here in Texas 100 million years before highways." — Jacobs

Wildfire on warming planet requires adaptive capacity at local, national, int’l scales

Industrialized nations that view wildfire as the enemy have much to learn from people in some parts of the world who have learned to live compatibly with wildfire, says a team of fire research scientists. The interdisciplinary team say there is much to be learned from these “fire-adaptive communities” and they are calling on policy makers to tap that knowledge, particularly in the wake of global warming.

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