Dallas Innovates: SMU Study Finds Simpler Way to Explain Physics of Running

Learning & Education

Dallas Innovates: SMU Study Finds Simpler Way to Explain Physics of Running

Dallas Innovates covered the research of Peter Weyand and colleagues in the SMU Locomotor Laboratory, who developed a concise approach to understanding the mechanics of human running.

D Magazine Dallas Innovates: SMU Students Taking Wireless Vehicle Tech to the Streets

Reporter Dave Moore with Dallas Innovates covered the research of Khaled Abdelghany in the Civil and Environmental Engineering Department of the SMU Lyle School of Engineering. Abdelghany is an associate professor and chair of the department.

New York Observer: Is Bigger Always More? How U.S. Museums Fared in 2016

The New York Observer newspaper relied on the expertise of Zannie Voss, director of SMU's National Center for Arts Research, for an article on how museums are faring at a time with tighter budgets and less revenue.

CBS News: The “spanking” debate — views depend on what you call it

CBS News covered the research of SMU Psychology Professor George W. Holden, co-author on a study that found corporal punishment is viewed as more acceptable and effective when it's referred to as spanking.

CW33: Spanking Sounds OK, Hitting Not So Much, SMU Study Says

Television station CW33 quoted SMU Psychology Professor Alan S. Brown for his latest research finding corporal punishment is viewed as more acceptable and effective when it's referred to as spanking.

Research: Women hit harder by the pressures of elite academic science

Work life in academia might sound like a dream: summers off, year-long sabbaticals, the opportunity to switch between classroom teaching and research. Yet, when it comes to the sciences, life at the top U.S. research universities is hardly idyllic. Based on surveys of over 2,000 junior and senior scientists, both male and female, as well as in-depth interviews, the new book "Failing Families, Failing Science" by SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln and Rice University sociologist Elaine Howard Ecklund examines how the rigors of a career in academic science makes it especially difficult to balance family and work.

Psychotherapy sessions are best in the morning when levels of helpful hormone are high

Patients make more progress toward overcoming anxiety, fears and phobias when their therapy sessions are scheduled in the morning, new research suggests. An SMU study found that morning sessions helped psychotherapy patients overcome their panic and anxiety and phobic avoidance better, in part, because levels of cortisol — a naturally occurring hormone — are at their highest then, said clinical psychologist Alicia E. Meuret.

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