The making of Maori society: An archaeological analysis of social networks

Fossils & Ruins

Radio New Zealand: New research sheds more light on ancient Pacific site

Radio New Zealand covered the research discovery of SMU archaeologist Mark D. McCoy. The new uranium series dating on the stone buildings of the ancient monumental city of Nan Madol suggests the ancient coral reef capital in the Pacific Ocean was the earliest among the islands to be ruled by a single chief, McCoy found.

D Magazine: The Trinity Project — More About Bones

Answers to these questions can be supplied in part because there’s a fossil record, thanks to the efforts of Winkler, Slaughter, and Ellis W. Shuler, the person for whom the museum is named. Journalist Laray Polk wrote about the Shuler Museum of Paleontology at SMU in the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences as [...]

Daily Mail: The first king — 1200 AD tomb reveals ancient city invented new kind of society

They used an X-ray gun ... and dates were calculated based on the characteristics of the radioactive isotope thorium-230 and its radioactive parent uranium-234. Science journalist Cheyenne MacDonald covered the research discovery of SMU archaeologist Mark D. McCoy. New dating on the stone buildings of the ancient monumental city of Nan Madol suggests the ancient [...]

Fox News: Mysterious Pacific island burial site is older than thought, study says

"Nan Madol represents a first in Pacific Island history. The tomb of the first chiefs of Pohnpei is a century older than similar monumental burials of leaders on other islands." — Mark McCoy, SMU Science reporter Rob Verger covered the research discovery that new dating on the stone buildings of the ancient monumental city of [...]

Evidence of first chief indicates Pacific islanders invented a new society on city they built of coral and basalt

SMU archaeologist Mark McCoy's new analysis of the chief’s tomb of Nan Madol suggests the island’s monumental structures are the earliest evidence of a chiefdom in the Pacific — yielding new keys to how societies emerge and evolve

Discovery News: Etruscan Inscription Reveals Name of Goddess

Science news site Discovery News covered a new discovery from the SMU-sponsored dig at Poggio Colla, a key settlement in Italy for the ancient Etruscan civilization. Archaeologists previously found a 2500-year-old slab in the foundation of a monumental temple at the dig, and have determined now that sacred text on the stele, as it's called, mentions the name "Uni," an Etruscan fertility goddess.

Daily Mail: Did the Etruscans follow a fertility cult? Inscribed stone slab reveals mysteries of ancient Italian civilisation

Science reporter Richard Gray covered a new discovery from the SMU-sponsored dig at Poggio Colla, a key settlement in Italy for the ancient Etruscan civilization. Archaeologists previously found a 2500-year-old slab in the foundation of a monumental temple at the dig, and have determined now that sacred text on the stele, as it's called, mentions the name "Uni," an Etruscan fertility goddess. The article, "Did the Etruscans follow a fertility cult? Inscribed stone slab reveals mysteries of ancient Italian civilisation," published in the Daily Mail Online Aug. 25.

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