Daily Mail: The two massive and mysterious Texas sinkholes on the verge of creating one colossal lake

Fossils & Ruins

Daily Mail: The two massive and mysterious Texas sinkholes on the verge of creating one colossal lake

Wink sinkholes, smu, remote satellite images, insar, ogallala aquiferLondon Daily Mail online journalist Ashley Collman covered the research of SMU geophysicists Zhong Lu, professor, Shuler-Foscue Chair, and Jin-Woo Kim research scientist, both in the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences at SMU. Collman's article, "The two massive and mysterious Texas sinkholes on the verge of creating one colossal lake," published June 16, 2016.

Grist: Massive sinkholes in Texas could combine to form even massiver sinkhole

Wink sinkholes, smu, remote satellite images, insar, ogallala aquiferGrist journalist Katie Herzog covered the research of SMU geophysicists Zhong Lu, professor, Shuler-Foscue Chair, and Jin-Woo Kim research scientist, both in the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences at SMU. Herzog's article, "Massive sinkholes in Texas could combine to form even massive sinkhole," published June 15, 2016.

Geohazard: Giant sinkholes near West Texas oil patch towns are growing — as new ones lurk

Two giant sinkholes that sit between two West Texas oil patch towns are growing — and two new ones appear to be lurking, say geophysicists at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Satellite radar images reveal substantial ground movement in and around the infamous sinkholes near Wink, Texas — suggesting expansion of the two existing holes, with subsidence in two other nearby areas suggesting new ones may surface.

Dallas Morning News: North Texas dino had tough armor, keen sense of smell

Pawpawsaurus had large nostrils that looked "like a trumpet bell" and wide air passages that helped the 100-million-year-old North Texas dinosaur smell predators, look for food or find mates.

Early armored dino from Texas lacked cousin’s club-tail weapon, but had a nose for danger

First-ever CT scans of the early armored dinosaur Pawpawsaurus campbelli reveal that although the Texas dino lacked its cousin’s club-tail it had a sharp nose for danger. A relative of Ankylosaurus, Pawpawsaurus’s saving grace from predators may have been an acute sense of smell, says SMU vertebrate paleontologist Louis Jacobs. Pawpawsaurus lived 100 million years ago, preceding Ankylosaurus by 35 million years.

Live Science: Fearsome Dinosaur-Age ‘Hammerhead’ Reptile Ate … Plants?

Hammerhead reptile, vegetarian, Jacobs, SMU Science journalist Laura Geggel tapped the expertise of SMU Earth Sciences Professor Louis L. Jacobs for a recent article about a prehistoric plant-eating reptile. A professor in Dedman College's Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, Jacobs is a world-renowned vertebrate paleontologist. He joined SMU's faculty in 1983 and in 2012 was honored by the 7,200-member Science Teachers Association of Texas with their prestigious Skoog Cup for his significant contributions to advance quality science education.

CNN: 2500-year-old slab reveals lost language

A team of scientists have uncovered a 2,500-year-old slab that may reveal details about the ancient Etruscan civilization. For more information To book a live or taped interview with Gregory Warden, call SMU News, 214-768-7654, or email news@smu.edu. Related links Gregory Warden Poggio Colla Field School Warden at SMU Etruscan exhibit at SMU's Meadows Museum [...]

TECH Insider: Archaeologists just discovered sacred text in mysterious language on a 2,500-year-old stone

Video journalist Grace Raver at TECH Insider covered SMU-sponsored research at Italy's Poggio Colla site where archaeologists have found what may be rare sacred text in the lost language of the Etruscans. The text is inscribed on a large 6th century BC sandstone slab and could reveal name of the god or goddess that was worshipped at the site.

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