Dedman College

SMU chemist Nicolay Tsarevsky wins prestigious National Science Foundation Career Award

Dedman Chemistry PortraitsSMU chemist Nicolay (Nick) Tsarevsky has received a prestigious National Science Foundation CAREER Award, expected to total $650,000 over five years, to fund his research into new methods of creating polymers — whose uses range from fluorescent materials to drug carriers, to everyday technologies.

NSF CAREER Awards are given to tenure-track faculty members who exemplify the role of teacher-scholars through outstanding research, excellent education and the integration of education and research in American colleges and universities. Continue reading

Posted in Earth & Climate, Researcher news | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Fermilab experiment observes change in neutrinos from one type to another over 500 miles

Initial data from a new U.S.–based physics experiment indicates scientists are a step closer to understanding neutrinos, the second most abundant particle in the universe, says SMU physics professor Thomas Coan, a principal investigator on the project.

Neutrinos are little understood, but indications are they hold clues to why matter overwhelmingly survived after the Big Bang instead of just energy in the form of light. Continue reading

Posted in Earth & Climate, Energy & Matter, Videos | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

New York Times: Scientists Trace an Ancient DNA Link Between Amazonians and Australasians

New York Times, Meltzer, DNA, genome, migration, first americansNew York Times reporter James Gorman interviewed SMU’s David Meltzer, a professor in the SMU Department of Anthropology, about a new large genome-scale study revealing ancestors of Native Americans arrived in the Americas in a single migration wave, no earlier than 23,000 years ago.

The finding addresses the ongoing debate over when and how many times the ancestors of present-day Native Americans entered the New World from Siberia. Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Society & Family, Fossils & Ruins, Researcher news, SMU In The News | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Los Angeles Times: Native American origins: When the DNA points two ways

la-sci-sn-native-american-origins-dna-20150721-001Los Angeles Times reporter Eryn Brown interviewed SMU’s David Meltzer, a professor in the SMU Department of Anthropology, about a new large genome-scale study revealing ancestors of Native Americans arrived in the Americas in a single migration wave, no earlier than 23,000 years ago. The finding addresses the ongoing debate over when and how many times the ancestors of present-day Native Americans entered the New World from Siberia. Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Society & Family, Fossils & Ruins, Researcher news, SMU In The News | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Large genome-scale study finds Native American ancestors arrived in single migration wave

Siberia, Meltzer, Paleoamericans, Clovis, first americans, migrationA new large genome-scale study reveals that the ancestors of all present-day Native Americans arrived in the Americas as part of a single migration wave, no earlier than 23,000 ago.

The finding addresses the ongoing debate over when and how many times the ancestors of present-day Native Americans entered the New World from Siberia. Archaeological evidence logs modern humans in the Americas 15,000 years ago. Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Society & Family, Earth & Climate, Fossils & Ruins, Researcher news | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

KERA: DNA From Kennewick Man Shows He Was Native American, Says Study With SMU Ties

Scultpted bust 400x300KERA News reporter Justin Martin interviewed SMU anthropologist David Meltzer from the SMU Department of Anthropology about the controversial 8,500-year-old skeleton called Kennewick Man.

Meltzer was part of a new study in the journal Nature that analyzed Kennewick Man’s genome sequence and found that Kennewick Man is more closely related to modern Native Americans than to any other population worldwide. Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Society & Family, Fossils & Ruins, Researcher news, SMU In The News | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Kennewick Man: genome sequence of 8,500-year-old skeleton solves scientific controversy

Scultpted bust 400x300An 8,500-year-old male skeleton discovered in 1996 in Washington State sparked bitter disputes between Native Americans, American scientists, and within the American scientific community. Earlier studies suggested he was not ancestral to Native Americans, blocking repatriation. Now his genome sequence shows Kennewick Man is more closely related to modern Native Americans than to any other population worldwide. Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Society & Family, Fossils & Ruins, Researcher news | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Daily Mail: Fretting over your weight? You may be ready for a baby

Meltzer, peak fertility, weight gain, SMULondon’s Daily Mail newspaper reported on the research of SMU social psychologist Andrea L. Meltzer, who was lead author on three independent studies that found biology isn’t the only reason women eat less as they near ovulation, a time when they are at their peak fertility.

The studies found that another part of the equation is a woman’s desire to maintain her body’s attractiveness, says Meltzer.
Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Society & Family, Health & Medicine, Researcher news, SMU In The News | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

At peak fertility, women who desire to maintain body attractiveness report they eat less

SMU, Meltzer, ovulation, weight loss, women, attractivenessBiology isn’t the only reason women eat less as they near ovulation, a time when they are at their peak fertility.

Three new independent studies found that another part of the equation is a woman’s desire to maintain her body’s attractiveness, says social psychologist and assistant professor Andrea L. Meltzer, Southern Methodist University, Dallas. Continue reading

Posted in Culture, Society & Family, Health & Medicine, Mind & Brain | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment