SMU engineering team to lead DARPA-funded research into holographic imaging of hidden objects

Marc Christensen

SMU engineering team to lead DARPA-funded research into holographic imaging of hidden objects

Figure_ExtensionToAdaptiveMultiApertureApproaches[1] Researchers from SMU’s Lyle School of Engineering will lead a multi-university team funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to build a theoretical framework for creating a computer-generated image of an object hidden from sight around a corner or behind a wall. The core of the proposal is to develop a computer algorithm to unscramble the light that bounces off irregular surfaces to create a holographic image of hidden objects.

Wired: Lasers Power Pentagon’s Next-Gen Artificial Limbs

Reporter Katie Drummond with Wired magazine has covered the research of SMU engineers Marc Christensen and Volkan Otugen. Christensen and Otugen are working as part of a consortium with industry and other universities to develop technology that will someday help amputees have "feeling" in their artificial limbs. The research is funded through a $5.6 million grant from the U.S. Department of Defense and industry for a center led by SMU's Lyle School of Engineering.

KERA: Engineering Hope: Research To Aid Injured Troops

CBS11fiberoptic.jpgReporter B.J. Austin with Dallas area Public Radio station KERA has interviewed SMU engineers Marc Christensen and Volkan Otugen who are working as part of a consortium with industry and other universities to develop technology that will someday help amputees have "feeling" in their artificial limbs.

Popular Science: A New Interface For Bionic Limbs

PopularScience%20400x300.jpg The monthly magazine Popular Science in its March issue covered SMU research to help develop revolutionary technology for advanced prosthetic limbs that will help amputees returning from war in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Two-way fiber optic communication between prosthetic limbs and peripheral nerves will be key to operating realistic robotic arms, legs and hands that not only move like the real thing, but also "feel" sensations like pressure and heat.

2010 a year of advances for SMU scientific researchers at the vanguard of those helping civilization

ATLAS%20150x120.jpgSMU scientists are at the forefront of cutting-edge research aimed at addressing some of the world's most pressing challenges, questions and issues.

See a sampling of the work they tackle, from Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases, to immigration, diabetes, evolution, childhood obesity and more. Besides working in campus labs and within the Dallas-area community, SMU scientists conduct research throughout the world.

CBS 11 DFW: Doctors using fiber optics for prosthetic limbs

CBS11fiberoptic.jpgA new $5.6 million center funded by the U.S. Department of Defense and industry is led by SMU's Lyle School of Engineering to develop revolutionary technology for advanced prosthetic limbs that will help amputees returning from war in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Two-way fiber optic communication between prosthetic limbs and peripheral nerves will be key to operating realistic robotic arms, legs and hands that not only move like the real thing, but also "feel" sensations like pressure and heat.

CBS Channel 11 in Dallas-Fort Worth covered the research with a program that aired Nov. 30 "Doctors Using Fiber Optics For Prosthetic Limbs."

New Scientist: Robot limbs to plug into the brain with light

Robotic%20hand%20150x120.jpgA new $5.6 million center funded by the U.S. Department of Defense and industry is led by SMU's Lyle School of Engineering to develop revolutionary technology for advanced prosthetic limbs that will help amputees returning from war in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Two-way fiber optic communication between prosthetic limbs and peripheral nerves will be key to operating realistic robotic arms, legs and hands that not only move like the real thing, but also "feel" sensations like pressure and heat.

Dallas Observer: SMU, DOD Partner Again, This Time on Prosthetics That Feel

Robotic%20hand%20150x120.jpgThe Dallas Observer's Robert Wilonsky writes about a new $5.6 million center funded by DOD and industry, and led by SMU's Lyle School of Engineering. The center will develop revolutionary technology for advanced prosthetic limbs that will help amputees returning from war in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Researchers also envision man-to-machine apps that extend beyond prosthetics, leading to brain implants to control tremors, modulators for chronic pain management and fused implants for spinal cord injuries.

SMU leads $5.6M research center for fiber optic interface to link robotic limbs, human brain

Robotic%20hand%20150x120.jpgA new $5.6 million center funded by DOD and industry is led by SMU's Lyle School of Engineering to develop revolutionary technology for advanced prosthetic limbs that will help amputees returning from war in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Researchers also envision man-to-machine apps that extend beyond prosthetics, leading to brain implants to control tremors, modulators for chronic pain management and fused implants for spinal cord injuries.

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