Jo Guldi and Sanderia Faye Smith, Festival of Books and Ideas serves up 5-day buffet of ideas for Dallas

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: June 6, 2019 The fifth annual Dallas Festival of Books and Ideas delivered an extravagant buffet of thought. Ideas overflowed, like the flash floods caused by downpours during the festival's final day on June 1. The talking points flitted from caring for the city's elderly to Dallas' cultural and racial diversity, to its need to be more welcoming, to its emerging status as a beacon of science and technology. As a kind of dessert to the main course, the festival also treated us to a candid look at Dallas' growing identity as a haven for people who write books. Speakers ranged from poets and novelists to scientists and architects, who over five days pondered a range of topics, underscoring the theme "The Open City." [...]

By | 2019-06-17T09:29:39-07:00 June 14th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jo Guldi and Sanderia Faye Smith, Festival of Books and Ideas serves up 5-day buffet of ideas for Dallas

Jeffrey Engel: The lesson of D-Day for Americans today

Twin Cities Originally Posted: June 6, 2019 Jeffrey Engel is director of Southern Methodist University’s Center for Presidential History and co-author of “Impeachment: An American History.” He wrote this column for the Washington Post. The views here are his own. “Lest we forget.” Expect to hear those words often as we mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day this week. More than half a million Allied airmen, soldiers and sailors invaded France that cold and blustery morning. More than 4,000 would be dead by day’s end. So, too, a thousand German soldiers and an estimated 3,000 French civilians. It was carnage. Lives were lost every day of the war — in the Soviet Union, one life every four seconds — but D-Day holds a special place [...]

By | 2019-06-13T08:38:39-07:00 June 13th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jeffrey Engel: The lesson of D-Day for Americans today

History offers little precedent for impeaching U.S. presidents

Washington Times Originally Posted: May 26, 2019 With Democrats debating whether to impeach President Trump, it’s worth remembering that no president has ever been removed via the impeachment process. Not so for the governors of Oklahoma. After Oklahoma gained statehood in 1907, the Legislature went on an impeachment tear, bringing charges against four governors and booting two from office. Still, voters didn’t hold it against them: One of the ousted governors later served in the state Senate, and the other was elected to the state’s Corporation Commission. READ MORE

By | 2019-06-04T08:17:05-07:00 June 5th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on History offers little precedent for impeaching U.S. presidents

Does Tony Horwitz’s New Book Get Texas Right?

Texas Monthly Originally Posted: May 2019 Andrew R. Graybill is the chair of the History Department at Southern Methodist University and the author of The Red and the White: A Family Saga of the American West. Several years ago Tony Horwitz was tasked by his wife to “ruthlessly cull” the books he had amassed as a college student during the Carter administration. Sifting through boxes stashed at their house on Martha’s Vineyard, Horwitz came across The Cotton Kingdom, an 1861 book by the New York journalist Frederick Law Olmsted—better known today as the landscape architect who co-designed Manhattan’s Central Park. The book was the culmination of several trips Olmsted had made to the American South, including Texas, in the 1850s. (His account of his rambles [...]

By | 2019-05-14T10:22:30-07:00 May 15th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Does Tony Horwitz’s New Book Get Texas Right?

Listen: On the Origins of the Impeachment Process

WNYC Studio Originally Posted: April 29, 2019 We’ve had only two presidential impeachment trials in the Senate — for Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton — and both ended in acquittals. While we have little experience with this presidential removal apparatus, there’s much to learn from the history of impeachment, going back to the framers who wrote the measure into our constitution. Jeffrey Engel is founding director of the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University, and coauthor of Impeachment: An American History. He explains to Bob that the authors of the constitution, having just freed themselves from a tyrant, wanted to make sure that there would be a way to counter what seemed to be an inevitable impulse toward tyranny in their new United States. LISTEN

By | 2019-05-01T10:10:21-07:00 May 1st, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Listen: On the Origins of the Impeachment Process

The Latino Arts Project is all about passion, not profit, in seeking a shared humanity — in Dallas

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: April 18, 2018 Jorge Baldorhas a history degree from Southern Methodist University and serves on the Dedman College Executive Board. The Latino Arts Project is a museum, not a gallery. And the difference is crucial. Galleries dominate Dragon Street, but the difference is, galleries are driven by profit. The Latino Arts Project is driven by passion — not profit. The artwork on its walls and floor will not be sold. Instead, it will serve as the driving force of a philosophical mission shared by two men who talk endlessly about art, culture and community, and a shared humanity in Dallas. The first exhibition in this pop-up museum will open May 5 (Cinco de Mayo) and run through Sept. 22, in an effort to [...]

By | 2019-04-22T08:49:49-07:00 April 23rd, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History|Comments Off on The Latino Arts Project is all about passion, not profit, in seeking a shared humanity — in Dallas

Tonight’s Stanton Sharp Lecture: Borderlands: A Global History of the Mexican Second Empire is cancelled due to severe weather

EVENT CANCELLED: April 17, 2019 Tonight’s Stanton Sharp Lecture: Borderlands: A Global History of the Mexican Second Empire is cancelled due to severe weather.

By | 2019-04-17T13:37:31-07:00 April 17th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History|Comments Off on Tonight’s Stanton Sharp Lecture: Borderlands: A Global History of the Mexican Second Empire is cancelled due to severe weather

Impeachment should be a no-brainer, no matter what the Mueller report says

Washington Post Originally Post: April 15, 2019 By Jeffrey A. Engel Jeffrey A. Engel is director of Southern Methodist University’s Center for Presidential History and co-author of "Impeachment: An American History." The views here are his own. The Constitution’s authors wouldn’t have needed any summary of the special counsel’s report to know it was time to impeach the president. Neither would they have waited to see whether its full text provided evidence of criminal wrongdoing. The group that created our nation’s founding document would already have judged Donald Trump unfit for office — and removed him — because he’s repeatedly shown a dearth of the quality they considered paramount in a president: a willingness to put national interest above his own. They called it virtue. George [...]

By | 2019-04-16T09:30:09-07:00 April 16th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Impeachment should be a no-brainer, no matter what the Mueller report says

Jeffrey Engel, Center for Presidential History, all the presidents’ vetoes

Backstory Originally Posted: April 5, 2019 To veto or not to veto? That was the question President George Washington wrestled with on this day in 1792. In honor of that decision, and the precedent it set for subsequent leaders, this week BackStory looks at presidential vetoes through two periods in American history. First, Joanne unpacks Washington’s complicated feelings about his first – and only – veto. Then, Brian speaks with historian Jeffrey Engel about how President Trump’s recent use of the veto pen fits into the big picture of presidents saying ‘thanks, but no thanks.’ LISTEN

By | 2019-04-15T11:25:11-07:00 April 15th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jeffrey Engel, Center for Presidential History, all the presidents’ vetoes

Jeffrey Engel, SMU CPH Director, featured in Christian Science Monitor

Christian Science Monitor Originally Posted: March 25, 2019 There is no foreseeable scenario under which Democrats will be satisfied with less than virtually complete access to Mr. Mueller’s work, says Jeffrey Engel, director of the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University. What happens now to America’s divisions? In the short run they may well get worse. Sunday’s release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s main conclusions, as summarized by Attorney General William Barr, could widen the gulf of suspicion and misunderstanding between the nation’s polarized political factions. Republicans are triumphant that the threat of a conspiracy indictment for President Donald Trump or his family members or associates has evaporated. Some are in no mood for forbearance and are urging the GOP leadership to push [...]

By | 2019-03-26T07:18:08-07:00 March 26th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jeffrey Engel, SMU CPH Director, featured in Christian Science Monitor
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