Politics Are We Ready to Rehabilitate George W. Bush’s Reputation?

Texas Monthly Originally Published: October 2020 Andrew R. Graybill is a professor of history and the director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University. The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum opened seven years ago and anchors the southeastern corner of campus at Southern Methodist University, where I teach history. In late November 2016, I took a tour of the facility with five college friends who were visiting from the East Coast. The recent presidential election was much on our minds as we wandered through the building, contemplating various artifacts from Bush’s two terms in office. Although we were hardly fans of his presidency, one of my pals—fearful, like everyone in our group, of a Trump administration—got misty-eyed [...]

By | 2020-09-17T10:32:56-07:00 September 18th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History, SW Center|Comments Off on Politics Are We Ready to Rehabilitate George W. Bush’s Reputation?

No one can predict the crises a president will face, so it’s better to vote on character (OPINION)

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: August 30, 2020 Jeffrey A. Engel directs the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University. He wrote this column for The Dallas Morning News. (OPINION) The Dallas Morning News is publishing a multi-part series on important issues for voters to consider as they choose a president this year. This is the third installment of our What’s at Stake series, and it focuses on presidential leadership. Find the full series here. Surely you predicted the fall of the Berlin Wall? Tiananmen Square? You also expected San Francisco’s World Series earthquake, and anticipated that the Exxon Valdez would choke Alaska’s coast with oil. Of course you didn’t. Neither did President George H.W. Bush, who confronted them all during his first year in [...]

By | 2020-08-31T13:21:29-07:00 August 31st, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on No one can predict the crises a president will face, so it’s better to vote on character (OPINION)

Contact tracing can stop COVID-19 — only if Americans allow government access to personal data

MSN Originally Posted: August 26, 2020 BY: Jo Guldi and Macabe Keiher Jo Guldi is an associate professor of history at Southern Methodist University. She teaches courses on data, text mining, and the history of capitalism. She is author of "Roads to Power: Britain Invents the Infrastructure State" and co-author, with David Armitage, of "The History Manifesto (2014)". Macabe Keliher is an assistant professor of Chinese history at Southern Methodist University. He is the author of "The Board of Rites and the Making of Qing China." Most Americans await a vaccine to end the pandemic and get us back to work. But the drama about vaccines and masks has obscured a practical answer to ending the pandemic that has already worked in other parts of the [...]

By | 2020-08-26T07:47:20-07:00 August 26th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Contact tracing can stop COVID-19 — only if Americans allow government access to personal data

More colleges should be teaching human rights courses today (opinion)

Inside Higher Ed Originally Posted: July 24, 2020 Our society is under simultaneous assaults on political, cultural, economic and social norms. Many people, especially those in different generations, are polarized as we confront an accelerated pace of change against institutionalized racism, bigotry and a systemically flawed criminal justice system that for too long has targeted the marginalized because of their skin color, ethnicity, country of origin or (lower) economic standing. I am 70 years old, and I am energized and excited to witness and support a younger generation demanding its turn at changing this country into what it can and must become in order to move forward. I came of age during a similar era of historic and tumultuous times. I lived through the violence [...]

By | 2020-07-29T07:30:30-07:00 July 28th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Embrey Human Rights Events, Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on More colleges should be teaching human rights courses today (opinion)

How SMU computer science professors are using their resources to help find a coronavirus vaccine

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: April 23, 2020 What if university computer scientists, biologists and historians collaborated to use modern artificial intelligence and machine learning to examine a massive trove of infectious disease research papers, text mining for abstract patterns, elusive insights and hard-to-spot trends related to COVID-19 and the coronavirus family of viruses? Imagine the energy such a group could generate if their students, working remotely and cut off from the normal distractions of student life, jumped in to volunteer for the project? Welcome to the nascent Southern Methodist University Artificial Intelligence Lab. READ MORE

By | 2020-06-30T09:30:04-07:00 July 6th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on How SMU computer science professors are using their resources to help find a coronavirus vaccine

How SMU computer science professors are using their resources to help find a coronavirus vaccine

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: April 24, 2020 Frederick R. Chang is a cyber security professor, chair of the Department of Computer Science at Southern Methodist University and the founding director of the SMU AI Lab. Jo Guldi is an associate professor of history at SMU, where she teaches text mining and is a founding member of the SMU AI Lab. They wrote this column for The Dallas Morning News. What if university computer scientists, biologists and historians collaborated to use modern artificial intelligence and machine learning to examine a massive trove of infectious disease research papers, text mining for abstract patterns, elusive insights and hard-to-spot trends related to COVID-19 and the coronavirus family of viruses? Imagine the energy such a group could generate if their students, [...]

By | 2020-04-24T12:39:24-07:00 April 24th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on How SMU computer science professors are using their resources to help find a coronavirus vaccine

Religious Resistance to Quarantine Has a Long History

Inside Source Originally Posted: March 10, 2020 About the Author: Bianca Lopez is a professor of Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. She wrote this for InsideSources.com. In numerous parts of the United States, certain stripes of Christianity and quarantine orders stand in direct opposition, resulting in deadly outcomes due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Ignoring or refusing to follow social distancing and stay-at-home guidelines, congregations from California to Florida have continued to assemble for worship services and thereby put themselves and their communities in peril. Examples include Sacramento County in California where more than 100 of the county’s 314 coronavirus cases are related to churches. Some of the congregations have ceased meeting in church buildings but continued to gather in homes, even [...]

By | 2020-04-13T06:12:23-07:00 April 13th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Religious Resistance to Quarantine Has a Long History

Hallie Hovey-Murray ’16 brings a fresh voice to autism advocacy

SMU News Originally Posted: March 10, 2020 Almost everyone has something that makes them “different.” But that distinction can become your strength, says Hallie Hovey-Murray ’16. She speaks from experience. Just weeks before graduating from SMU, she wrote an op-ed that began, “Hi, my name is Hallie, and I have autism.” Soon after the piece was published, Hallie’s inbox blew up with invitations to tell her story. A history major in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, she earned her bachelor’s degree at 20 and decided to use her new-found celebrity to shine a light on autism. She returned to her home state of Virginia to study law, and became the only contestant with autism to compete in the Miss Virginia pageant. For her [...]

By | 2020-03-11T07:54:28-07:00 March 11th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Hallie Hovey-Murray ’16 brings a fresh voice to autism advocacy

SMU historian Andrew R. Graybill is a newly elected member of the Texas Institute of Letters

Dallas Weekly Originally Posted: March 5, 2020 SMU historian Andrew R. Graybill and University alumna Regina Taylor, an actress and playwright, are newly elected members of the Texas Institute of Letters, an organization that celebrates Texas literature and recognizes distinguished literary achievement. Graybill and Taylor are among 19 new members to be inducted at the upcoming institute annual meeting, to be held in Georgetown March 27-29. “I was thrilled to be selected, particularly because of the extraordinary achievements of the institute’s other members,” Graybill says. “Texas is often undersold. It’s an exceptionally creative place. And to enter as part of a class that includes musicians Robert Earl Keen and James McMurtry is especially exciting to me.” Graybill, a San Antonio native, is a professor in the [...]

By | 2020-03-09T11:33:46-07:00 March 6th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History, SW Center|Comments Off on SMU historian Andrew R. Graybill is a newly elected member of the Texas Institute of Letters

Could George Washington Be Elected Today?

Psychology Today Originally Posted: Feb. 16, 2020 George Washington won his two terms in office as president with the unanimous consent of the Electoral College. In fact, he ran unopposed. What made him so popular? Although Washington was the commander in chief of the Continental Army, he wasn’t the best general in the Continental army. And while not a dullard, many of his contemporaries were far smarter than he. And although he was the president of the Constitutional Convention, he was far from the best politician. Washington’s popularity rested elsewhere. Some context helps understand Washington’s great appeal. The country had won its independence from Great Britain and no one wanted to return to a regime of tyranny. So the original conglomeration of states formed the [...]

By | 2020-02-26T09:17:37-08:00 February 26th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Could George Washington Be Elected Today?
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