Claims data will power new research initiative developing predictive models to fight opioid crisis

Healthcare Business Originally Posted: July 11, 2019 By Bill Lucia Today, Americans are more likely to die from an accidental opioid overdose than a car accident, according to the National Safety Council. And as the opioid crisis continues to ravage the U.S., it’s easy to lose sight of the fact that it is a global dilemma that extends to virtually all corners of the developed world. Big data to improve outcomes This research effort is all about the shared common goal of harnessing big data and digital technologies to deliver better outcomes in healthcare, with each member of the coalition contributing its own unique and deep expertise. The Digital Health CRC — which is the largest digital health research cooperative in the world, with funding [...]

By | 2019-07-17T08:18:54-07:00 July 17th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Graduate News, Statistical Science|Comments Off on Claims data will power new research initiative developing predictive models to fight opioid crisis

Tiny Texas dinosaur finally has a name nearly 35 years after discovery in treasure trove of fossils

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: April 4, 2019 About 120 million years ago, flocks of small dinosaurs bounded from plant to plant in an open floodplain southwest of what is now Fort Worth. They stood on two legs as they foraged for leaves and shoots. The smallest hatchlings were about the length of your hand, while the largest measured 9 feet from head to tail. “They were birdlike and very agile, slender, fast-running dinosaurs,” said Kate Andrzejewski, a postdoctoral fellow at Southern Methodist University and lead author of a highly anticipated new paper in the journal PLOS ONE that describes these creatures for the first time. The dinosaurs, which Andrzejewski and her colleagues named Convolosaurus marri, make up the largest trove of dinosaur fossils ever discovered in Texas. Convolosaurus means “flocking [...]

By | 2019-04-04T11:26:34-07:00 April 4th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Tiny Texas dinosaur finally has a name nearly 35 years after discovery in treasure trove of fossils

Dallas’ lost neighborhood, “Little Egypt,” is focus of free presentation at African American Museum

SMU News Originally Posted: January 30, 2019 Clive Siegle, a professor at Richland College, received his PhD in history at SMU. (Dallas) – When Richland College faculty members Clive Siegle and Tim Sullivan started collaborating on the joint project “Finding Little Egypt,” little did they know how far they and their students would delve into the history and anthropology of a Dallas neighborhood which disappeared decades ago. The history of that missing community and where its residents went will be the subject of a free presentation by Siegle and Sullivan on Sat., Feb. 9, at the African American Museum of Dallas. “Lost and Found: Little Egypt, Fifty Years Later,” which starts at 1 p.m. in the museum’s AT&T auditorium, is free and open to the [...]

By | 2019-01-30T06:42:41-07:00 January 30th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Graduate News, History|Comments Off on Dallas’ lost neighborhood, “Little Egypt,” is focus of free presentation at African American Museum

Building Foundations for a Data-Driven Future

Dedman College News Originally Posted: Jan. 1, 2019 Vince Miller, a student in the M.S. in Applied Statistics and Data Analytics (MASDA) program graduating this fall, fills us in on his journey to data science, what it’s really like to study in the program, and how data science will continue to shape our world. For more information about Dedman’s MASDA program, including a program overview, requirements, and more from students, visit the MASDA program website.   Tell us a little bit about yourself! Where are you from? What do you like to do for fun? What led you to data science? I grew up in Ohio and attended The Ohio State University for my undergrad, where I studied chemical engineering. I love adventure, especially outdoors, and [...]

By | 2019-01-03T08:38:23-07:00 January 8th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News, Statistical Science|Comments Off on Building Foundations for a Data-Driven Future

Congrats to Biology Ph.D. students, Lacin Yapindi and Tetiana Hutchison

Dedman College News Originally Posted: November 5, 2018 Updated Nov. 12, 2018 - Lacin Yapindi won a second place award for the best oral presentation. Tetiana Hutchison won a second place award for best poster. The two biology Ph.D. students presented at the 2018 Texas Branch American Society for Microbiology (ASM) meeting at Texas A&M University in Corpus Christi on Nov 8-10, 2018. Congratulations! Robert Harrod, Associate Professor & Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Biological Sciences announced today that two of his Ph.D. students, Lacin Yapindi and Tetiana Hutchison, were selected to present at the 2018 Texas Branch American Society for Microbiology (ASM) meeting at Texas A&M University in Corpus Christi on Nov 8-10, 2018. The event promotes the science of microbiology throughout the state through meetings, [...]

By | 2018-11-19T12:12:26-07:00 November 20th, 2018|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on Congrats to Biology Ph.D. students, Lacin Yapindi and Tetiana Hutchison

How an SMU dinosaur hunter’s 72-million-year-old sea monster got to the Smithsonian

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: November 14, 2018 Three weeks before his team's fossil finds go on display at one of the world's most famous natural history museums, Louis Jacobs stands in a basement lab at Southern Methodist University sanding the lower jaw of a 72-million-year-old sea monster. His colleague Michael Polcyn sits nearby, dabbing sealant on a model of the animal's upper jaw and skull. White dust hovers in the air. Plaster tailbones, skulls and teeth top every counter. This is the sort of work — preparing models and fossils — that Jacobs had done early in his career, before he became a professor, before he hunted for fossils in Alaska, Antarctica, Malawi, Cameroon and Texas; before he dug up the bones of dinosaurs [...]

By | 2018-11-14T18:23:37-07:00 November 15th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Events, Faculty News|Comments Off on How an SMU dinosaur hunter’s 72-million-year-old sea monster got to the Smithsonian

Listen: Scientists Unveil Ancient Sea Monsters Found In Angola

NPR Originally Posted: November 8, 2018 When the South Atlantic Ocean was young, sea monsters ruled it. Some of their bones have turned up along the coast of West Africa and are going on exhibit Friday at the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. They tell a story of the bloody birth of an ocean. The fossils of giant swimming reptiles called mosasaurs have been found in the rocky cliffs of Angola, overlooking the Atlantic. It's not a country known for fossils. Few scientists have looked there — half a century of civil war made it too dangerous. But geologically, Angola is special. About 200 million years ago, Africa was part of the supercontinent Gondwana. Then, about 135 million years ago, that continent started unzipping down [...]

By | 2018-11-08T06:51:27-07:00 November 8th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Listen: Scientists Unveil Ancient Sea Monsters Found In Angola

New Smithsonian Exhibit Reflects the Passion of SMU Professor and an Army of Student Fossil Hounds

SMU News Originally Posted: October 15, 2018 Sea Monsters Unearthed: Life in Angola’s Ancient Seas opens Nov. 9 at National Museum of Natural History Once the exhibit opens, “Sea Monsters Unearthed: Life in Angola’s Ancient Seas” will allow visitors to visually dive into the cool waters off the coast of West Africa as they existed millions of years ago when the continents of Africa and South America were drifting apart. It’s a unique opportunity to examine fossils of ancient marine reptiles and learn about the forces that continue to mold life both in out of the ocean. But the back story is just as fascinating: SMU Emeritus Professor of Paleontology Louis Jacobs and his SMU colleague Michael Polcyn forged a partnership with collaborators in Angola, [...]

By | 2018-10-17T09:52:32-07:00 October 17th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Events, Faculty News, Graduate News, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on New Smithsonian Exhibit Reflects the Passion of SMU Professor and an Army of Student Fossil Hounds

Starting conversations that never end

SMU Graduate Studies Originally Posted: September 2018 Find out how a Dedman Interdisciplinary Research Cluster created new connections between students and faculty from religious studies, art history, art and world languages and launched conversations exploring biases and inclusion. EXCERPT: One of the great rewards of graduate school is meeting like-minded individuals with whom one shares intellectual curiosities. These newfound relationships not only make graduate life enjoyable but also enrich one’s thinking and research work. At SMU, we have been fortunate to find a multidisciplinary community of students and professors with whom to exchange ideas in and outside of the classroom. During the spring of 2018, we had an opportunity to bring that community together through the Dedman Interdisciplinary Research Cluster titled “On Decolonial Options and the Writing [...]

By | 2018-10-10T09:53:21-07:00 October 11th, 2018|DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on Starting conversations that never end

Former Clements Fellow Andrew Torget prepares to break a Guinness World Record in teaching the longest lesson

Chronicle of Higher Education Originally Posted: July 26, 2018 On August 24 at 9 a.m., Andrew Torget will take the podium in a University of North Texas auditorium, clad in a suit and armed with 500 pages of notes. Forty-five students will be seated in front of him, notebooks — no laptops! — at the ready. He’ll open his notes, clear his throat, and begin his lecture. If he’s going to successfully teach the longest recorded history class ever, he won’t be able to stop, aside from occasional brief breaks, for the next 30 hours. At least 10 of his students will have to stick it out, too. Torget, an associate professor of history at North Texas, is gunning for an official Guinness World Record — for [...]

By | 2018-07-27T08:27:11-07:00 July 27th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Graduate News, History|Comments Off on Former Clements Fellow Andrew Torget prepares to break a Guinness World Record in teaching the longest lesson
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