12 Surprising Facts About the Legislative Branch

The History Channel Originally Posted: October 3, 2019 The executive branch enforces laws. The judicial branch interprets laws. But it is in the law-making legislative branch, says Howard Schweber, a political science professor at the University of Wisconsin, “that the people deliberate and arrive at an agreement about the common good.” When writing the U.S. Constitution, the framers built in three branches of federal government to ensure a separation of powers, and, as Article I states, “All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.” “The point of the Constitution was to replace a system in which the national government could only make laws that affected states in their relations with one another,” Schweber says. [...]

By | 2019-10-07T08:35:10-07:00 October 7th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on 12 Surprising Facts About the Legislative Branch

History offers little precedent for impeaching U.S. presidents

Washington Times Originally Posted: May 26, 2019 With Democrats debating whether to impeach President Trump, it’s worth remembering that no president has ever been removed via the impeachment process. Not so for the governors of Oklahoma. After Oklahoma gained statehood in 1907, the Legislature went on an impeachment tear, bringing charges against four governors and booting two from office. Still, voters didn’t hold it against them: One of the ousted governors later served in the state Senate, and the other was elected to the state’s Corporation Commission. READ MORE

By | 2019-06-04T08:17:05-07:00 June 5th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on History offers little precedent for impeaching U.S. presidents

Listen: On the Origins of the Impeachment Process

WNYC Studio Originally Posted: April 29, 2019 We’ve had only two presidential impeachment trials in the Senate — for Andrew Johnson and Bill Clinton — and both ended in acquittals. While we have little experience with this presidential removal apparatus, there’s much to learn from the history of impeachment, going back to the framers who wrote the measure into our constitution. Jeffrey Engel is founding director of the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University, and coauthor of Impeachment: An American History. He explains to Bob that the authors of the constitution, having just freed themselves from a tyrant, wanted to make sure that there would be a way to counter what seemed to be an inevitable impulse toward tyranny in their new United States. LISTEN

By | 2019-05-01T10:10:21-07:00 May 1st, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Listen: On the Origins of the Impeachment Process

Impeachment should be a no-brainer, no matter what the Mueller report says

Washington Post Originally Post: April 15, 2019 By Jeffrey A. Engel Jeffrey A. Engel is director of Southern Methodist University’s Center for Presidential History and co-author of "Impeachment: An American History." The views here are his own. The Constitution’s authors wouldn’t have needed any summary of the special counsel’s report to know it was time to impeach the president. Neither would they have waited to see whether its full text provided evidence of criminal wrongdoing. The group that created our nation’s founding document would already have judged Donald Trump unfit for office — and removed him — because he’s repeatedly shown a dearth of the quality they considered paramount in a president: a willingness to put national interest above his own. They called it virtue. George [...]

By | 2019-04-16T09:30:09-07:00 April 16th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Impeachment should be a no-brainer, no matter what the Mueller report says

Jeffrey Engel, SMU CPH Director, featured in Christian Science Monitor

Christian Science Monitor Originally Posted: March 25, 2019 There is no foreseeable scenario under which Democrats will be satisfied with less than virtually complete access to Mr. Mueller’s work, says Jeffrey Engel, director of the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University. What happens now to America’s divisions? In the short run they may well get worse. Sunday’s release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s main conclusions, as summarized by Attorney General William Barr, could widen the gulf of suspicion and misunderstanding between the nation’s polarized political factions. Republicans are triumphant that the threat of a conspiracy indictment for President Donald Trump or his family members or associates has evaporated. Some are in no mood for forbearance and are urging the GOP leadership to push [...]

By | 2019-03-26T07:18:08-07:00 March 26th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jeffrey Engel, SMU CPH Director, featured in Christian Science Monitor

Listen: The Past, Present & Future Of Impeachment

KERA Originally Posted: Feb. 22, 2019 Andrew Johnson, Richard Nixon and Bill Clinton each served as President of the United States. And each faced impeachment while in office. Host Krys Boyd hosts a panel discussion about the use of impeachment with the authors of “Impeachment: An American History” (Modern Library). Joining us are Jeffrey Engel, founding director of the Center for Presidential History at Southern Methodist University; Peter Baker, chief White House correspondent for the New York Times; Timothy J. Naftali, former director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum; and historian Jon Meacham. LISTEN

By | 2019-02-28T11:02:21-07:00 March 1st, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Listen: The Past, Present & Future Of Impeachment

Who Gets to Write an Anonymous Op-Ed?

Rolling Stone Originally Posted: September 6, 2018 Jeffrey Engel, director of the SMU Center for Presidential History, is quoted in this article. What does a Trump administration official have in common with a woman fleeing gang violence in El Salvador and a student in Iran speaking out against Ahmadinejad? They share the rare distinction of having written anonymous op-eds for the New York Times. On Wednesday, the Times published an anonymous op-ed by a senior official inside the Trump administration claiming to be part of “the resistance,” working to thwart Trump’s “worst inclinations” from within the White House. The author called the president’s leadership style “impetuous, adversarial, petty and ineffective,” and claimed to be working, along with “likeminded colleagues,” to limit the damage done by [...]

By | 2018-09-12T10:17:48-07:00 September 13th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Who Gets to Write an Anonymous Op-Ed?

Save the Date: The Age of Eisenhower: America and the World of the 1950s

Event Date: September 20 Time: 6:00 pm - 7:30 pm Location: Dallas Hall 306 (McCord Auditorium)   Learn More: http://blog.smu.edu/cph/event/age-of-eisenhower-america-and-the-world-of-the-1950s/ Description: This event will feature Will Hitchcock from the University of Virginia as he discusses his latest book, Age of Eisenhower: America and the World of the 1950s.

By | 2018-08-27T09:14:29-07:00 August 27th, 2018|Events|Comments Off on Save the Date: The Age of Eisenhower: America and the World of the 1950s

CPH Postdoctoral Fellow Paul Renfro offers historical perspective on the crisis at the border for the Washington Post

Washington Post Originally Posted: June 19, 2019 The real reason we’re locking children in cages We don't think nonwhite children deserve the same protections as “innocent” white ones. By Paul M. Renfro. Renfro is a postdoctoral fellow at Southern Methodist University, and beginning in August 2018, he will be a Dean’s Postdoctoral Scholar in the department of history at Florida State University. Americans are horrified by images and stories coming from the southern border. The U.S. government is brutalizing children and families — keeping children in cages, separated from their parents — purportedly in the name of border security. As outrage has increased, the spotlight has heated up, spurring politicians to speak out and contemplate action. As shocking and aberrant as this saga might seem — [...]

By | 2018-06-19T10:39:43-07:00 June 19th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News, History|Comments Off on CPH Postdoctoral Fellow Paul Renfro offers historical perspective on the crisis at the border for the Washington Post

Watch: Jeff Engel, Center for Presidential History, discusses Iran nuclear deal

Fox4 Originally Posted: May 9, 2018 Dr. Jeff Engel, the director of SMU's Center for Presidential History, stops by Good Day to talk about the Iran nuclear deal. President Trump made a campaign promise and followed through. But how will it affect talks in North Korea? Will it have an impact on American business. Watch

By | 2018-05-09T12:37:20-07:00 May 10th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Watch: Jeff Engel, Center for Presidential History, discusses Iran nuclear deal
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