Fox Host Brian Kilmeade’s New Book About the Alamo Isn’t Fair and Balanced

Texas Monthly Originally Posted: December 11, 2019 Andrew R. Graybill is professor of history and director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University. On the eve of the publication of his new book about the Texas Revolution, Brian Kilmeade gave a promotional interview to his Fox News colleague Tucker Carlson. “All they wanted was a shot at success,” he said of the Anglo settlers who in the 1820s and 1830s flocked to what was then northern Mexico. “[T]hey said, ‘I’ll be a part of Mexico as long as you give us freedom and liberty.’” But, as Kilmeade explained to Carlson, when the Mexican government abrogated what the Americans believed were their rights—including unfettered immigration from the United States and [...]

By | 2019-12-12T09:09:49-08:00 December 12th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Fox Host Brian Kilmeade’s New Book About the Alamo Isn’t Fair and Balanced

Texas has been ground zero for capital punishment for over 40 years

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: December 1, 2019 Dec. 1, Rick Halperin, director of the SMU Human Rights Program, co-authored by Roger C. Barnes for a piece about Texas being “ground zero” in the U.S. for carrying out capital punishment. Thus far in 2019, there have been 20 executions carried out in the United States. Eight of them have been in Texas. There are four more executions scheduled in the country by year’s end, and one of them is to be carried out in Texas. Since the death penalty in the U.S. was reinstated in 1976, there have been a total of 1,510 executions. A staggering 566 of them have been in Texas. In other words, Texas has been ground zero for capital punishment for over [...]

By | 2019-12-02T08:03:45-08:00 December 2nd, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Embrey Human Rights Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Texas has been ground zero for capital punishment for over 40 years

Americans remain split on impeachment after public hearings begin, poll says

PBS News Originally Posted: Nov. 19, 2019 Presidential historian Jeffrey Engel was quoted in this article. Days into public impeachment hearings, nearly half of Americans want Congress to impeach President Donald Trump and remove him from office, according to a new poll from the PBS NewsHour, NPR and Marist. The latest data does not show a significant change in public attitudes since the hearings began last Wednesday. But this next round of testimony could give Democrats more chances to sway public opinion — unless Americans stick to already rigid partisan lines. Among U.S. adults, 45 percent said they support the impeachment and the ouster of Trump from office, with 82 percent of Democrats, 39 percent of politically independent voters and 7 percent of Republicans approving such [...]

By | 2019-11-19T09:16:41-08:00 November 19th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Americans remain split on impeachment after public hearings begin, poll says

Historian Jeffrey Engel Takes Listener Questions On Impeachment Inquiry

NPR Originally Posted: Nov. 17, 2019 NPR's Michel Martin poses listener questions about the impeachment inquiry to historian Jeffrey Engel, co-author of Impeachment: An American History. READ MORE

By | 2019-11-19T09:19:44-08:00 November 17th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Historian Jeffrey Engel Takes Listener Questions On Impeachment Inquiry

We were lucky to survive the Berlin Wall’s fall

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: Nov. 9, 2019 Thirty years ago this week the impossible happened: the Berlin Wall fell. More accurately it was crushed by Berliners both East and West who’d had enough of the scar across their cityscape. Like crowds before them, in Leipzig and Dresden in East Germany, in Budapest and Warsaw too, demonstrators demanding change stared down soldiers and police, and won. We were lucky to survive. Crowds can be dangerous. Call that same group a mob and one immediately understands why. They spasm often without coordination or regard for their organizer’s peaceful intent, easily undone by a single protester who breaks rank to toss a brick, or by a trembling young recruit gripped by fear and too tightly gripping his [...]

By | 2019-11-11T09:31:03-08:00 November 11th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on We were lucky to survive the Berlin Wall’s fall

12 Surprising Facts About the Legislative Branch

The History Channel Originally Posted: October 3, 2019 The executive branch enforces laws. The judicial branch interprets laws. But it is in the law-making legislative branch, says Howard Schweber, a political science professor at the University of Wisconsin, “that the people deliberate and arrive at an agreement about the common good.” When writing the U.S. Constitution, the framers built in three branches of federal government to ensure a separation of powers, and, as Article I states, “All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.” “The point of the Constitution was to replace a system in which the national government could only make laws that affected states in their relations with one another,” Schweber says. [...]

By | 2019-10-07T08:35:10-08:00 October 7th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on 12 Surprising Facts About the Legislative Branch

The William P. Clements Department of History and the Center for Presidential History welcome Gordon H. Chang

Alien Chinese Railroad Workers and American National History Date: Thursday, October 3, 2019 Time: 5:30 PM (CT) Location: Martha Proctor Mack Grand Ballroom The Clements Department of History and the Center for Presidential History at SMU welcome Gordon H. Chang, history professor and Senior Associate Vice Provost for Undergraduate Education at Stanford University, as part of the Stanton Sharp Lecture Series. Chang studies the history of America-China relations, U.S. diplomacy, and Asian American history and currently co-directs the Chinese Railroad Workers in North America Project. His lecture is free and open to the public following a brief reception. For more information, please contact Margi Evans at mfevans@smu.edu.

By | 2019-09-30T08:21:53-08:00 October 2nd, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, History|Comments Off on The William P. Clements Department of History and the Center for Presidential History welcome Gordon H. Chang

Great Expectations

Inside Higher Ed Originally Posted: September 10, 2019 Jo Guldi learns a lesson from students who embrace the challenge of high academic standards. At midterm, half of the class was failing. I had encouraged everyone to come to my office hours, and so they did, flooding in to ask questions and complain. At least one of my student visitors presented outrage at the way he had been treated and said he wanted me to account for the grades. The particular subject of his outrage was my standard of clear, well-supported, written argumentation. "We're supposed to be learning about history, not about writing," complained my student. I was taken aback. I briefly considered wrangling with his assumption that historical understanding and clear writing could be divorced, [...]

By | 2019-09-24T10:58:09-08:00 September 24th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Great Expectations

Jill. E. Kelly, South Africa: How a chief defied apartheid and upheld democracy for the good of his people

The Conversation Originally Posted: August 20, 2019 By: Jill E. Kelly, Associate Professor of History, Southern Methodist University Disclosure statement Jill E. Kelly's research has been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies (2015) and Fulbright (2010-2011, 2018-2019). The recently released report of President Cyril Ramaphosa’s advisory panel on land reform, and the latest efforts to force through two controversial traditional authority bills, point to the continued legacies of changes to the relationship between traditional leaders, their followers, and land in South Africa’s history. The panel calls for a resolution to the “contending philosophies around land tenure” — those of individual rights and those of communalism. But as traditional leaders fight to continue their control over communally held land, there also needs to be a [...]

By | 2019-09-04T07:36:28-08:00 September 4th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jill. E. Kelly, South Africa: How a chief defied apartheid and upheld democracy for the good of his people

A Story About El Paso and Soccer That You Should Read

D Magazine Originally Posted: August 16, 2019 You might recognize the name Roberto José Andrade Franco. He’s a Ph.D. candidate at SMU who has written a few stories for D Magazine. Roberto is from El Paso. He was there when a North Texas man killed 22 people in a Walmart. At the time, Roberto had an assignment from Deadspin to write about soccer in Juarez. There was no way he could write about the sport without addressing the violence. The result was quite something. A taste: I’ve made that drive so many times I’ve lost count. I know where to stop for gas and which bathrooms are clean. As you drive into that open west Texas land, hours pass between glimpses of even moderate-sized cities. [...]

By | 2019-09-04T07:42:10-08:00 September 3rd, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News, History|Comments Off on A Story About El Paso and Soccer That You Should Read
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