SMU alumna wins ‘Nobel Prize for anthropologists’

American Anthropological Association  Originally Posted: November 13, 2018 Katherine E. Browne earned her master’s and Ph.D. from SMU Katherine E. Browne's academic research and engaged anthropology have energized the fields of economic anthropology, disaster studies, and visual ethnography. She is currently a professor in the Department of Anthropology at Colorado State University. In her first book, Creole Economics: Caribbean Cunning under the French Flag (2004), Browne investigated the informal economy among Afro-Creole people in Martinique. Continuing her interest in the relationship between community and economic values, Browne shifted her research focus to New Orleans to address the devastation wrought by Hurricane Katrina in the Gulf Coast. Her NSF-funded documentary film on this work, Still Waiting: Life after Katrina, was broadcast on more than 300 PBS stations and was followed [...]

By | 2018-11-13T06:51:47+00:00 November 13th, 2018|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on SMU alumna wins ‘Nobel Prize for anthropologists’

Congrats to Biology Ph.D. students, Lacin Yapindi and Tetiana Hutchison

Dedman College News Originally Posted: November 5, 2018 Robert Harrod, Associate Professor & Director of Graduate Studies in the Department of Biological Sciences announced today that two of his Ph.D. students, Lacin Yapindi and Tetiana Hutchison, were selected to present at the 2018 Texas Branch American Society for Microbiology (ASM) meeting at Texas A&M University in Corpus Christi on Nov 8-10, 2018. The event promotes the science of microbiology throughout the state through meetings, discussion, and education.   Lacin Yapindi, a third year Ph.D. candidate will give a talk entitled “The high-risk human papillomavirus subtype-18 E6 oncoprotein induces the TP53-induced glycolysis and apoptosis regulator (TIGAR, an antioxidant effector that is essential for in vivo tumorigenesis.”     Tetiana Hutchison, a senior Ph.D. student will give a poster presentation on [...]

By | 2018-11-05T08:55:44+00:00 November 5th, 2018|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on Congrats to Biology Ph.D. students, Lacin Yapindi and Tetiana Hutchison

New Smithsonian Exhibit Reflects the Passion of SMU Professor and an Army of Student Fossil Hounds

SMU News Originally Posted: October 15, 2018 Sea Monsters Unearthed: Life in Angola’s Ancient Seas opens Nov. 9 at National Museum of Natural History Once the exhibit opens, “Sea Monsters Unearthed: Life in Angola’s Ancient Seas” will allow visitors to visually dive into the cool waters off the coast of West Africa as they existed millions of years ago when the continents of Africa and South America were drifting apart. It’s a unique opportunity to examine fossils of ancient marine reptiles and learn about the forces that continue to mold life both in out of the ocean. But the back story is just as fascinating: SMU Emeritus Professor of Paleontology Louis Jacobs and his SMU colleague Michael Polcyn forged a partnership with collaborators in Angola, [...]

By | 2018-10-17T09:52:32+00:00 October 17th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Events, Faculty News, Graduate News, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on New Smithsonian Exhibit Reflects the Passion of SMU Professor and an Army of Student Fossil Hounds

Starting conversations that never end

SMU Graduate Studies Originally Posted: September 2018 Find out how a Dedman Interdisciplinary Research Cluster created new connections between students and faculty from religious studies, art history, art and world languages and launched conversations exploring biases and inclusion. EXCERPT: One of the great rewards of graduate school is meeting like-minded individuals with whom one shares intellectual curiosities. These newfound relationships not only make graduate life enjoyable but also enrich one’s thinking and research work. At SMU, we have been fortunate to find a multidisciplinary community of students and professors with whom to exchange ideas in and outside of the classroom. During the spring of 2018, we had an opportunity to bring that community together through the Dedman Interdisciplinary Research Cluster titled “On Decolonial Options and the Writing [...]

By | 2018-10-10T09:53:21+00:00 October 11th, 2018|DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on Starting conversations that never end

SMU alum moves company headquarters to Houston, announce residency at the world’s largest medical complex

PR Log Originally Posted: July 25, 2018 Edward Allegra, co-founder and CEO of BioLum Sciences graduated from SMU in 2014 with degrees in biology and economics. BioLum Sciences Announces Residency at JLABS @ TMC BioLum Sciences is pleased to announce residency at Johnson & Johnson Innovation, JLABS at the Texas Medical Center (JLABS @ TMC) - the world's largest medical complex. As a result, BioLum has relocated its company headquarters from Dallas, TX to Houston, TX. "The TMC ecosystem provides us with numerous opportunities for collaborations and partnerships that will undoubtedly play key roles in the commercialization of our technology," said Edward Allegra, co-founder and CEO of BioLum Sciences. "We couldn't be more excited to be surrounded by other startups and industry leaders who are at [...]

By | 2018-08-02T08:52:11+00:00 July 31st, 2018|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Economics, Graduate News|Comments Off on SMU alum moves company headquarters to Houston, announce residency at the world’s largest medical complex

Former Clements Fellow Andrew Torget prepares to break a Guinness World Record in teaching the longest lesson

Chronicle of Higher Education Originally Posted: July 26, 2018 On August 24 at 9 a.m., Andrew Torget will take the podium in a University of North Texas auditorium, clad in a suit and armed with 500 pages of notes. Forty-five students will be seated in front of him, notebooks — no laptops! — at the ready. He’ll open his notes, clear his throat, and begin his lecture. If he’s going to successfully teach the longest recorded history class ever, he won’t be able to stop, aside from occasional brief breaks, for the next 30 hours. At least 10 of his students will have to stick it out, too. Torget, an associate professor of history at North Texas, is gunning for an official Guinness World Record — for [...]

By | 2018-07-27T08:27:11+00:00 July 27th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Graduate News, History|Comments Off on Former Clements Fellow Andrew Torget prepares to break a Guinness World Record in teaching the longest lesson

Newsweek: Bodies of 95 Forced Labors Uncovered During Texas School District Construction Project

Newsweek Originally Posted: July 19, 2018 Dr. Catrina Whitley, Gwen Bakke, and Abigail Fisher are working on a historic African American cemetery in Houston. Dr. Whitley is a Dedman College alumna and a former adjunct lecturer in the Department of Anthropology. Gwen Bakke and Abigail Fisher are SMU anthropology Ph.D. students. A school district in Texas unearthed a long-forgotten cemetery, during a construction project, which archaeologists now believe contains the bodies of black forced-labor prisoners. The remains of 95 people were discovered in February in the city Sugar Land, just southwest of Houston. This week, researchers announced the bodies likely belonged to black people who were working in forced-labor camps, at a moment in history, between 1878 and 1910, when slavery had already been abolished. The discovery was made [...]

By | 2018-07-27T07:55:19+00:00 July 27th, 2018|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Newsweek: Bodies of 95 Forced Labors Uncovered During Texas School District Construction Project

Two SMU Graduate Students Named Dallas-Fort Worth Schweitzer Fellows

Dedman College News Originally Posted: July 26, 2018 The Dallas-Fort Worth Albert Schweitzer Fellowship (ASF), housed in Dedman College, announced the selection of its fourth cohort of Schweitzer Fellows, and two SMU students have been awarded this prestigious Fellowship and will spend the next year learning to effectively address the social factors that impact health and developing lifelong leadership skills. In doing so, they will follow the example set by famed physician-humanitarian Albert Schweitzer, for whom their Fellowship is named. Vanessa Uzoh The Schweitzer Fellows from SMU bring unique skills and insights to the Fellowship, illustrating the interdisciplinary nature of the program. Vanessa Uzoh, ’13,  currently pursuing an MS in Health Promotion Management, is addressing nutrition and a lack of physical activity. Partnering [...]

By | 2018-07-26T11:07:25+00:00 July 26th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on Two SMU Graduate Students Named Dallas-Fort Worth Schweitzer Fellows

Ancient American farmers supplemented poor diet through fungus infection

COSMOS Originally Posted: July 18, 2018 A mystery concerning how some of North America’s first farmers survived on a diet that appears manifestly inadequate may have been solved. The ancestral Pueblo people who lived in what is now known as the Four Corners region of the southwestern United States shifted from a nomadic to a settled lifestyle centred on crop-growing around 400BCE. The primary crop cultivated was maize (known in the US as corn), which accounted for an estimated 80% of calorific intake. During the ensuing 800 years – a stretch known as the Basketmaker II period – the settlers’ diet contained very little meat. This was perhaps a cultural choice. Basketmaker II people became efficient turkey farmers, but the birds were raised primarily for [...]

By | 2018-07-24T08:24:12+00:00 July 24th, 2018|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News|Comments Off on Ancient American farmers supplemented poor diet through fungus infection

Native bison hunters amplified climate impacts on North American prairie fires

Eureka Alert Originally Posted: July 23, 2018 Study shows hunter-gatherers used active burning to improve grazing, drive bison, long before arrival of Columbus DALLAS (SMU) - Native American communities actively managed North American prairies for centuries before Christopher Columbus' arrival in the New World, according to a new study led by Southern Methodist University (SMU) archaeologist Christopher I. Roos. Fire was an important indigenous tool for shaping North American ecosystems, but the relative importance of indigenous burning versus climate on fire patterns remains controversial in scientific communities. The new study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), documents the use of fire to manipulate bison herds in the northern Great Plains. Contrary to popular thinking, burning by indigenous hunters combined with climate variability to [...]

By | 2018-07-23T19:20:53+00:00 July 23rd, 2018|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Native bison hunters amplified climate impacts on North American prairie fires
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