Fox Host Brian Kilmeade’s New Book About the Alamo Isn’t Fair and Balanced

Texas Monthly Originally Posted: December 11, 2019 Andrew R. Graybill is professor of history and director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University. On the eve of the publication of his new book about the Texas Revolution, Brian Kilmeade gave a promotional interview to his Fox News colleague Tucker Carlson. “All they wanted was a shot at success,” he said of the Anglo settlers who in the 1820s and 1830s flocked to what was then northern Mexico. “[T]hey said, ‘I’ll be a part of Mexico as long as you give us freedom and liberty.’” But, as Kilmeade explained to Carlson, when the Mexican government abrogated what the Americans believed were their rights—including unfettered immigration from the United States and [...]

By | 2019-12-12T09:09:49-08:00 December 12th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Fox Host Brian Kilmeade’s New Book About the Alamo Isn’t Fair and Balanced

What happened to the fossil on display at DFW Airport? Curious Texas digs up the answer

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: Nov. 27, 2019 When DFW International Airport was being built in the 1970s, construction crews found the bones of a 70 million-year-old sea monster. Well, it wasn’t a monster exactly, but a 25-foot long plesiosaur, a large dinosaur with a body similar to a lizard’s but with flippers like those on a porpoise. It was one of many that roamed North Texas when water covered the land millions of years ago. The nearly 10,000-pound fossil was put on display between Gates 10 and 11 at the Braniff International terminal at DFW Airport in 1975, and it remained there even after Braniff Airways ceased operations in May 1982. The artifact later was moved again, and in the mid-2010s, the plesiosaur was [...]

By | 2019-11-27T09:28:56-08:00 November 30th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on What happened to the fossil on display at DFW Airport? Curious Texas digs up the answer

Americans remain split on impeachment after public hearings begin, poll says

PBS News Originally Posted: Nov. 19, 2019 Presidential historian Jeffrey Engel was quoted in this article. Days into public impeachment hearings, nearly half of Americans want Congress to impeach President Donald Trump and remove him from office, according to a new poll from the PBS NewsHour, NPR and Marist. The latest data does not show a significant change in public attitudes since the hearings began last Wednesday. But this next round of testimony could give Democrats more chances to sway public opinion — unless Americans stick to already rigid partisan lines. Among U.S. adults, 45 percent said they support the impeachment and the ouster of Trump from office, with 82 percent of Democrats, 39 percent of politically independent voters and 7 percent of Republicans approving such [...]

By | 2019-11-19T09:16:41-08:00 November 19th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Americans remain split on impeachment after public hearings begin, poll says

Historian Jeffrey Engel Takes Listener Questions On Impeachment Inquiry

NPR Originally Posted: Nov. 17, 2019 NPR's Michel Martin poses listener questions about the impeachment inquiry to historian Jeffrey Engel, co-author of Impeachment: An American History. READ MORE

By | 2019-11-19T09:19:44-08:00 November 17th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Historian Jeffrey Engel Takes Listener Questions On Impeachment Inquiry

11/14 @ 1pm SMU’s Maria Richards will be testifying before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Subcommittee on Energy

SMU News Originally Posted: Nov. 13, 2019 SMU's Maria Richards, an authority on geothermal energy, will be testifying before the U.S. House of Representatives' Subcommittee on Energy about how to unearth the next wave of energy innovation using water and geothermal power. You can watch the live tweet Thursday, 11/14 at 1 p.m. CT here: https://science.house.gov/hearings/water-and-geothermal-power-unearthing-the-next-wave-of-energy-innovation  

By | 2019-11-13T10:32:02-08:00 November 13th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences|Comments Off on 11/14 @ 1pm SMU’s Maria Richards will be testifying before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Subcommittee on Energy

Some Personality Traits Are Easier To Change Than Others

Forbes Originally Posted: September 2019 A growing number of studies in psychology are showing that personality is more “changeable” than previously thought. Personality changes as we age; it changes as we learn new things and are exposed to new environments. But which aspects of personality might be easiest to change, and which might be most difficult? New research appearing in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology may hold the answer. A team of researchers led by Nathan Hudson of Southern Methodist University designed an experiment to test which of five core personality traits would change most over the course of a 15-week intervention. Interestingly, they found that the personality trait of “agreeableness” showed the most improvement while the trait “openness to experiences” showed the least improvement. To arrive [...]

By | 2019-10-21T10:06:33-08:00 October 21st, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Some Personality Traits Are Easier To Change Than Others

Jill DeTemple is teaching local students and faculty nationwide how to effectively navigate hot-button topics

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: October 17, 2019 I don’t know about you, but the sorry state of what passes for debate these days — hair-trigger anger and social media carpet-bombing — beats me into believing that thoughtful discussion about life’s toughest stuff is dead and gone. Too often, I wind up feeling timid, tentative or just plain tired-head around hot-button issues. That’s why I went back to college last week to look into what I had heard were powerful efforts by one professor and her students to revive civil discourse. I didn’t find a magic potion for what ails society, but I did come back with better ideas on how to reengage. The timing couldn’t have been better, given the hotbed of political emotions [...]

By | 2019-10-17T08:42:50-08:00 October 17th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Religious Studies|Comments Off on Jill DeTemple is teaching local students and faculty nationwide how to effectively navigate hot-button topics

The (Lack of) Science Behind Time-Outs As a Tool to Discipline Children

Time Originally Posted: October 15, 2019 George Holden, chair of the Department of Psychology at Southern Methodist University was quoted in this article When Amy and Steve Unruh decided to adopt a four-year-old child from the Philippines, they anticipated challenges. They understood it would take time, as well as a great deal of love and care, for their family and its newest member to adjust. But they were committed to helping a child in need. The Unruh’s were blindsided when their adoption application was turned down. The reason, they were told, was that their parenting style was not suitable for an adopted child. “They said it was because we’ve used time-outs with our daughter,” says Amy Unruh, 43, who is a stay-at-home mom in Milton, [...]

By | 2019-10-15T09:27:35-08:00 October 15th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on The (Lack of) Science Behind Time-Outs As a Tool to Discipline Children
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