Jo Guldi and Sanderia Faye Smith, Festival of Books and Ideas serves up 5-day buffet of ideas for Dallas

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: June 6, 2019 The fifth annual Dallas Festival of Books and Ideas delivered an extravagant buffet of thought. Ideas overflowed, like the flash floods caused by downpours during the festival's final day on June 1. The talking points flitted from caring for the city's elderly to Dallas' cultural and racial diversity, to its need to be more welcoming, to its emerging status as a beacon of science and technology. As a kind of dessert to the main course, the festival also treated us to a candid look at Dallas' growing identity as a haven for people who write books. Speakers ranged from poets and novelists to scientists and architects, who over five days pondered a range of topics, underscoring the theme "The Open City." [...]

By | 2019-06-13T08:41:23-07:00 June 17th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jo Guldi and Sanderia Faye Smith, Festival of Books and Ideas serves up 5-day buffet of ideas for Dallas

Jeffrey Engel: The lesson of D-Day for Americans today

Twin Cities Originally Posted: June 6, 2019 Jeffrey Engel is director of Southern Methodist University’s Center for Presidential History and co-author of “Impeachment: An American History.” He wrote this column for the Washington Post. The views here are his own. “Lest we forget.” Expect to hear those words often as we mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day this week. More than half a million Allied airmen, soldiers and sailors invaded France that cold and blustery morning. More than 4,000 would be dead by day’s end. So, too, a thousand German soldiers and an estimated 3,000 French civilians. It was carnage. Lives were lost every day of the war — in the Soviet Union, one life every four seconds — but D-Day holds a special place [...]

By | 2019-06-13T08:38:39-07:00 June 13th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jeffrey Engel: The lesson of D-Day for Americans today

Wildlife Crime Threatens Species and Fuels Transnational Crime

The Catalyst Originally Posted: June 6, 2019 An Essay by the Bush Institute's J.H. Cullum Clark and Natalie Gonnella-Platts The large-scale worldwide illegal wildlife industry has a staggering impact on Earth’s wildlife. Sustainable solutions to defeat wildlife crime do exist and can succeed in reducing poaching and reviving animal populations. READ MORE

By | 2019-06-13T08:36:37-07:00 June 13th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Wildlife Crime Threatens Species and Fuels Transnational Crime

Virtual Reality Brings Cervical Cancer Surgery Training to Physicians

Watch "Surgeons in developing countries can more easily get training on the procedure, potentially saving women’s lives," said Dr. Eric G. Bing, who co-authored a study on the simulation and is a global health professor at Southern Methodist University (SMU). Watch SMU’s Lifesaving VR video to learn more.  

By | 2019-06-10T09:21:32-07:00 June 10th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Virtual Reality Brings Cervical Cancer Surgery Training to Physicians

History offers little precedent for impeaching U.S. presidents

Washington Times Originally Posted: May 26, 2019 With Democrats debating whether to impeach President Trump, it’s worth remembering that no president has ever been removed via the impeachment process. Not so for the governors of Oklahoma. After Oklahoma gained statehood in 1907, the Legislature went on an impeachment tear, bringing charges against four governors and booting two from office. Still, voters didn’t hold it against them: One of the ousted governors later served in the state Senate, and the other was elected to the state’s Corporation Commission. READ MORE

By | 2019-06-04T08:17:05-07:00 June 5th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on History offers little precedent for impeaching U.S. presidents

Dedman College Announces Outstanding Professor, Student, and Caren Prothro Faculty Service Award Winners

Congratulations to the following who received prestigious Dedman College awards on May 9, 2019. Outstanding Dedman Family Professor: Steven Vik  Robert and Nancy Dedman Outstanding Senior Student:  Stejara Dinulescu Caren Prothro Faculty Service Award: Lynne Stokes

By | 2019-06-04T09:20:07-07:00 June 4th, 2019|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Events, Faculty News, Psychology, Statistical Science|Comments Off on Dedman College Announces Outstanding Professor, Student, and Caren Prothro Faculty Service Award Winners

Ph.D. Alumna Elizabeth Wheaton publishes a textbook and receives a teaching prize

Economics at Temple Originally Posted: April 29, 2019 Dr. Elizabeth (Beth) Wheaton, 2006 Ph.D. alumna, currently CEO at Equip the Saints and Economics Senior Lecturer at Southern Methodist University, celebrated two important achievements in this academic year. She had her book Economics of Human Rights published in the Fall and this April she was one of the two recipients of the 2019 SMU ALEC PAT “Pretty Amazing Teacher” Award, which honors professors who encourage their students to get the tutoring and academic training they need, challenges students to become better learners, and works in partnership with the SMU ALEC (Althshuler Learning Enhancement Center). We reached out to her about her textbook and she answered our questions as follows. Q. What is the reason behind creating this book? [...]

By | 2019-05-05T18:30:04-07:00 May 2nd, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Ph.D. Alumna Elizabeth Wheaton publishes a textbook and receives a teaching prize

Watch: Unlocking the Mystery of Dark Matter

FOX 4 Originally Posted: April 15, 2019 An SMU physics professor has a special talent for making her field of study, understandable to the rest of us.   She's also among the leading researchers, trying to confirm the presence of dark matter in the universe.   Dan Godwin gets a few quick science lessons, in this Fox4ward. WATCH

By | 2019-04-15T14:03:04-07:00 April 15th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on Watch: Unlocking the Mystery of Dark Matter

Call me by my name: And no, I’m not NAFTA

Dallas Business Journal Originally Posted: April 4, 2019 Luisa del Rosal, executive director of the SMUMission Food Texas-Mexico Center, is quoted in this Dallas Business Journal article. Call it USMCA, NAFTA Redux, NAFTA 2.0, or “The Trade Agreement formerly known as NAFTA.” You can even call it by its name: The United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement. But until it’s actually approved by Congress or scuttled by the Trump Administration, the complex trade relationship that has developed between the North American nations over the past 25 years remains at an uncomfortable crossroads. A change in administrations in Mexico, the volatility along the U.S.-Mexico border and a general preference within the Trump Administration for bilateral relationships are creating uncertainties about the new trade framework even before it is approved, [...]

By | 2019-04-04T08:44:21-07:00 April 4th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Tower Center|Comments Off on Call me by my name: And no, I’m not NAFTA
Load More Posts