Opinion: Parenting as violence erupts around the corner

Austin American Statesman Originally Posted: August 12, 2019 By Jo Guldi Jo Guldi is a professor at Southern Methodist University and a mother of a three-year-old. I am raising my child in a terrifying time from which I can’t protect her, nor have I done anything, with all my education and privilege, to fix the problems that inspire such rage and fear in me. My friend Rebekkah, a child therapist and descendant of survivors of pogroms, agrees. “I feel sickened,” she writes. Here we were, a child therapist and a professor, both mothers of small children, trying to digest the disturbing news of climate change, detention centers and mass shootings. The event we fixed on was not the incomprehensible gun violence in El Paso, but one [...]

By | 2019-08-19T08:37:39-07:00 August 19th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History|Comments Off on Opinion: Parenting as violence erupts around the corner

U.S. and China trade war, and why experts disagree on its impact

Market News Originally Posted: August 7, 2019 The ongoing trade war between the United States and China continues to make an impact on businesses even beyond the two nations’ borders. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin are currently meeting with Chinese diplomats in Shanghai to find a resolution. Until an agreement is reached though, businesses and consumers will continue to deal with the uncertainty. “I don’t think there’s much optimism, or I’m pretty sure there is no optimism, that this round of talks is going to get very far,” Southern Methodist University Associate Professor of Economics James Lake said. READ MORE

By | 2019-08-07T14:40:22-07:00 August 12th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on U.S. and China trade war, and why experts disagree on its impact

Could a trade war trigger the next recession, and how would that impact Colorado?

Denver Post Originally Posted: June 9, 2019 Ravi Batra, SMU professor of international economics was interviewed for this article. The U.S. economic expansion marks its 10th year this month, matching the 1990s recovery for longevity. But rising tensions caused by trade disputes are raising worries that the expansion could tumble to the ground, taking the decade’s economic gains with it. “If we can’t stabilize trade relations soon, that’s the biggest risk for a recession,” Carl Tannenbaum, chief economist with The Northern Trust Co., said on a recent visit to Denver. Tannenbaum said any weakening of the economy will be much milder than the last time. But a trade-induced slowdown would hit businesses and industries that rely on the global supply chain, including Colorado’s farmers and [...]

By | 2019-06-13T08:45:46-07:00 June 21st, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Could a trade war trigger the next recession, and how would that impact Colorado?

Jo Guldi and Sanderia Faye Smith, Festival of Books and Ideas serves up 5-day buffet of ideas for Dallas

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: June 6, 2019 The fifth annual Dallas Festival of Books and Ideas delivered an extravagant buffet of thought. Ideas overflowed, like the flash floods caused by downpours during the festival's final day on June 1. The talking points flitted from caring for the city's elderly to Dallas' cultural and racial diversity, to its need to be more welcoming, to its emerging status as a beacon of science and technology. As a kind of dessert to the main course, the festival also treated us to a candid look at Dallas' growing identity as a haven for people who write books. Speakers ranged from poets and novelists to scientists and architects, who over five days pondered a range of topics, underscoring the theme "The Open City." [...]

By | 2019-06-17T09:29:39-07:00 June 14th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jo Guldi and Sanderia Faye Smith, Festival of Books and Ideas serves up 5-day buffet of ideas for Dallas

Jeffrey Engel: The lesson of D-Day for Americans today

Twin Cities Originally Posted: June 6, 2019 Jeffrey Engel is director of Southern Methodist University’s Center for Presidential History and co-author of “Impeachment: An American History.” He wrote this column for the Washington Post. The views here are his own. “Lest we forget.” Expect to hear those words often as we mark the 75th anniversary of D-Day this week. More than half a million Allied airmen, soldiers and sailors invaded France that cold and blustery morning. More than 4,000 would be dead by day’s end. So, too, a thousand German soldiers and an estimated 3,000 French civilians. It was carnage. Lives were lost every day of the war — in the Soviet Union, one life every four seconds — but D-Day holds a special place [...]

By | 2019-06-13T08:38:39-07:00 June 13th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jeffrey Engel: The lesson of D-Day for Americans today

Wildlife Crime Threatens Species and Fuels Transnational Crime

The Catalyst Originally Posted: June 6, 2019 An Essay by the Bush Institute's J.H. Cullum Clark and Natalie Gonnella-Platts The large-scale worldwide illegal wildlife industry has a staggering impact on Earth’s wildlife. Sustainable solutions to defeat wildlife crime do exist and can succeed in reducing poaching and reviving animal populations. READ MORE

By | 2019-06-13T08:36:37-07:00 June 13th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Wildlife Crime Threatens Species and Fuels Transnational Crime

Virtual Reality Brings Cervical Cancer Surgery Training to Physicians

Watch "Surgeons in developing countries can more easily get training on the procedure, potentially saving women’s lives," said Dr. Eric G. Bing, who co-authored a study on the simulation and is a global health professor at Southern Methodist University (SMU). Watch SMU’s Lifesaving VR video to learn more.  

By | 2019-06-10T09:21:32-07:00 June 10th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Virtual Reality Brings Cervical Cancer Surgery Training to Physicians

History offers little precedent for impeaching U.S. presidents

Washington Times Originally Posted: May 26, 2019 With Democrats debating whether to impeach President Trump, it’s worth remembering that no president has ever been removed via the impeachment process. Not so for the governors of Oklahoma. After Oklahoma gained statehood in 1907, the Legislature went on an impeachment tear, bringing charges against four governors and booting two from office. Still, voters didn’t hold it against them: One of the ousted governors later served in the state Senate, and the other was elected to the state’s Corporation Commission. READ MORE

By | 2019-06-04T08:17:05-07:00 June 5th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on History offers little precedent for impeaching U.S. presidents

Dedman College Announces Outstanding Professor, Student, and Caren Prothro Faculty Service Award Winners

Congratulations to the following who received prestigious Dedman College awards on May 9, 2019. Outstanding Dedman Family Professor: Steven Vik  Robert and Nancy Dedman Outstanding Senior Student:  Stejara Dinulescu Caren Prothro Faculty Service Award: Lynne Stokes

By | 2019-06-04T09:20:07-07:00 June 4th, 2019|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Events, Faculty News, Psychology, Statistical Science|Comments Off on Dedman College Announces Outstanding Professor, Student, and Caren Prothro Faculty Service Award Winners
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