SMU virologist in NYT

New York Times Originally Posted: August 20, 2020 Drug Pitched to Trump for Covid-19 Comes From a Deadly Plant The chief executive of My Pillow, a Trump donor, claims oleandrin is a miracle cure for Covid-19. But no studies have shown that it is safe or effective, and the shrub it’s derived from is poisonous. An excerpt from the NYT article: So why would anyone think oleandrin could be a treatment for Covid? It’s not uncommon for plants — even poisonous ones — to generate interest as treatments for disease. Robert Harrod, a professor at Southern Methodist University, has studied oleandrin’s potential to fight a type of leukemia, for example. Although Dr. Harrod said that using oleandrin to treat the coronavirus was not yet more [...]

By | 2020-08-21T08:38:33-07:00 August 21st, 2020|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on SMU virologist in NYT

More colleges should be teaching human rights courses today (opinion)

Inside Higher Ed Originally Posted: July 24, 2020 Our society is under simultaneous assaults on political, cultural, economic and social norms. Many people, especially those in different generations, are polarized as we confront an accelerated pace of change against institutionalized racism, bigotry and a systemically flawed criminal justice system that for too long has targeted the marginalized because of their skin color, ethnicity, country of origin or (lower) economic standing. I am 70 years old, and I am energized and excited to witness and support a younger generation demanding its turn at changing this country into what it can and must become in order to move forward. I came of age during a similar era of historic and tumultuous times. I lived through the violence [...]

By | 2020-07-29T07:30:30-07:00 July 28th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Embrey Human Rights Events, Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on More colleges should be teaching human rights courses today (opinion)

SMU’s Caroline Brettell receives faculty career achievement award

SMU News Originally Posted: July 20, 2020 Caroline Brettell, University Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, has been named the 2020 recipient of the SMU Faculty Career Achievement Award for her contributions to the teaching, scholarship, and service missions of the University. READ MORE  

By | 2020-07-20T10:27:05-07:00 July 20th, 2020|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on SMU’s Caroline Brettell receives faculty career achievement award

A local archaeologist wants you to understand how the field really works.

D Magazine Originally Posted: July 2020 Mark D. McCoy is a geospatial archaeologist and professor at SMU. Prior to our first meeting on campus, I had envisioned a dark office crowded with high-tech equipment and stacks of technical manuals. Instead, I walked into a light, airy space with a low-tech chalkboard and an approachable person who carries with him the sensibility of the sea. Raised in Delaware and educated in the States and New Zealand, McCoy focuses his efforts on Oceania. He has worked in the Hawaiian Islands, New Zealand, Pohnpei, and Palau. His new book, Maps for Time Travelers: How Archaeologists Use Technology to Bring Us Closer to the Past, is like the author: accessible. While the book takes on the esoteric subject of how [...]

By | 2020-07-13T06:26:52-07:00 July 13th, 2020|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on A local archaeologist wants you to understand how the field really works.

How SMU computer science professors are using their resources to help find a coronavirus vaccine

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: April 23, 2020 What if university computer scientists, biologists and historians collaborated to use modern artificial intelligence and machine learning to examine a massive trove of infectious disease research papers, text mining for abstract patterns, elusive insights and hard-to-spot trends related to COVID-19 and the coronavirus family of viruses? Imagine the energy such a group could generate if their students, working remotely and cut off from the normal distractions of student life, jumped in to volunteer for the project? Welcome to the nascent Southern Methodist University Artificial Intelligence Lab. READ MORE

By | 2020-06-30T09:30:04-07:00 July 6th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on How SMU computer science professors are using their resources to help find a coronavirus vaccine

When memory and justice fail us

The Hill Originally Post: June 20, 2020 Holly Bowen is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at SMU Dallas where she teaches and directs research on topics including memory, emotion, motivation and aging. Think back to the last time you went on a mission to stock up on supplies due to COVID-19. What route did you take around the store? Can you describe the employee who bagged your groceries? What was the make and model of the car parked next to you? It’s likely this memory is difficult to retrieve and the details surrounding it have faded. After all, this was a stressful and uncertain time and your focus might have been elsewhere. It was some time ago and you have probably forgotten. Now, [...]

By | 2020-06-22T06:15:23-07:00 June 22nd, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on When memory and justice fail us

Activism usually linked to urban centers finds a voice in the frustrations of rapidly changing communities.

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: June 8, 2020 For the seventh day in a row, dozens of sign-waving suburbanites dotted a busy corner in Flower Mound last week, demanding racial equality and decrying police brutality on what seemed unlikely soil as passing motorists honked in support. In this 80% white, Denton County city of 80,000, they’d united in response to the very public death of George Floyd, who died May 25 in the custody of Minneapolis police, an incident that has spawned significant national unrest. “George Floyd’s life was extinguished on camera for the world to see,” said Laura Haines, a white resident who has been among those gathered daily at Long Prairie and Cross Timbers roads. “We’re all seeing what black people have been [...]

By | 2020-06-17T09:59:00-07:00 June 12th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Sociology, Sociology (Faculty)|Comments Off on Activism usually linked to urban centers finds a voice in the frustrations of rapidly changing communities.

I Was Arrested for the Same Reason as George Floyd, and Lived. That’s White Privilege | Opinion

Newsweek Originally Posted: June, 4, 2020 By Mark D. McCoy, an Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology at Southern Methodist University and expert in the application of geospatial technology in archaeology. At Sunday family dinner, the conversation turned to the killing of George Floyd and the ensuing protests. It is not unusual for my wife and me to talk to our 12-year-old daughter about the news and this kind of tragedy has come up again and again. My wife filled us in on some of the heart wrenching and terrifying details that we had missed. Then, while our toddler busied himself pushing around the food on his plate, our daughter pointed out something that we had missed. Mr. Floyd died while being arrested for [...]

By | 2020-06-08T09:37:38-07:00 June 8th, 2020|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on I Was Arrested for the Same Reason as George Floyd, and Lived. That’s White Privilege | Opinion

‘Cult of Glory’ Review: Falling Heroes

Wall Street Journal Originally Posted: June 5, 2020 By Andrew R. Graybill, Director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies. In 1935, Walter Prescott Webb—one of the 20th century’s leading historians of Texas and the wider American West—published “The Texas Rangers: A Century of Frontier Defense.” Clocking in at more than 550 pages, the book chronicled the exploits of the most famous law-enforcement outfit in the world. Crucial to Webb’s study were the interviews he conducted with dozens of active and former Rangers, some of whom had served during the especially tumultuous years between Reconstruction and World War I. Although “The Texas Rangers” remains enormously popular today, it has not aged well. READ MORE

By | 2020-06-05T10:15:31-07:00 June 5th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History, SW Center|Comments Off on ‘Cult of Glory’ Review: Falling Heroes

The myth of diminished learning during quarantine

Jewish Post Originally Posted: May 29, 2020 As a professor at SMU Dallas, I am saddened by mainstream media’s myopic view of pandemic-induced online education. Whether it be op-eds about students receiving inferior educations in virtual classrooms or stories about parents suing colleges for “not getting their money’s worth,” public discourse lacks an alternative perspective. My own experience is quite the opposite. I witnessed an increase in student engagement and performance in my admittedly small classes afforded by a private university for my students who were unburdened by medical or socio-economic stress. My experience is not isolated but is echoed anecdotally by numerous colleagues in various parts of the nation. Deprived of non-academic distractions, many of my students became virtually monastic (pun intended). With more [...]

By | 2020-05-29T09:59:31-07:00 May 29th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Jewish Studies Program, Jewish Studies Program|Comments Off on The myth of diminished learning during quarantine
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