SMU historian Andrew R. Graybill is a newly elected member of the Texas Institute of Letters

Dallas Weekly Originally Posted: March 5, 2020 SMU historian Andrew R. Graybill and University alumna Regina Taylor, an actress and playwright, are newly elected members of the Texas Institute of Letters, an organization that celebrates Texas literature and recognizes distinguished literary achievement. Graybill and Taylor are among 19 new members to be inducted at the upcoming institute annual meeting, to be held in Georgetown March 27-29. “I was thrilled to be selected, particularly because of the extraordinary achievements of the institute’s other members,” Graybill says. “Texas is often undersold. It’s an exceptionally creative place. And to enter as part of a class that includes musicians Robert Earl Keen and James McMurtry is especially exciting to me.” Graybill, a San Antonio native, is a professor in the [...]

By | 2020-03-09T11:33:46-07:00 March 6th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History, SW Center|Comments Off on SMU historian Andrew R. Graybill is a newly elected member of the Texas Institute of Letters

Genetics Magazine Highlights Research from Department of Biological Science

GENETICS MAGAZINE Originally Posted: March 2020 issue Differential Contributions of DNA-Binding Proteins to Polycomb Response Element Activity at theDrosophila giant Gene ABSTRACT Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved epigenetic regulators whose primary function is to maintain the transcriptional repression of target genes. Recruitment of Drosophila melanogaster PcG proteins to target genes requires the presence of one or more Polycomb Response Elements (PREs). The functions or necessity for more than one PRE at a gene are not clear and individual PREs at some loci may have distinct regulatory roles. Various combinations of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins are present at a given PRE, but only Pleiohomeotic (Pho) is present at all strong PREs. The giant (gt) locus has two PREs, a proximal PRE1 and a distal PRE2. During [...]

By | 2020-03-05T08:21:38-08:00 March 5th, 2020|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Genetics Magazine Highlights Research from Department of Biological Science

Cancelled. Research Cluster Event: Branding Management Using Sentiment Analysis

DCII Events Cancelled for Remainder of Spring Semester Due to COVID-19   Event Location: Heroy 153 Time:2 - 4 p.m. Date: April 24 Dr. Tim McDonough (Cox) will give an overview of how sentiment analysis has become integral to brand management. Alex Cerda (Marketing & Comm.) will provide examples of how sentiment analysis is used in the management of the SMU brand via social media. Link for more information: smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Programs/ResearchClusters  

By | 2020-03-23T14:55:56-07:00 March 4th, 2020|DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News|Comments Off on Cancelled. Research Cluster Event: Branding Management Using Sentiment Analysis

VR is making medical training cheaper, better, and more accessible than ever

Digital Trends Originally Posted: March 1, 2020 Sometimes, location is everything. When Dr. Eric Bing started working at Dallas’ Southern Methodist University (SMU), the person in the office next to his would give him a new perspective on how virtual reality can be instrumental in teaching medical students. SMU happens to have one of the world’s best graduate schools for video game design and Bing’s office neighbor, Professor Anthony Cuevas, helps create the curriculum for it. Surgery and first person shooters may seem worlds apart, but over the course of several months, the professors’ neighborly chitchat gave rise to a low-cost VR training system that can be implemented in locations where medical schools are limited, such as sub-saharan Africa. READ MORE

By | 2020-03-03T08:24:57-08:00 March 3rd, 2020|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on VR is making medical training cheaper, better, and more accessible than ever

Do women scientists need to wear fake beards to be taken seriously?

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: Feb. 24, 2020 At first glance, the black-and-white photos look like classic images of 19th century scientists. One wears a dark beard and carries a pickax. Another, with a fluffy white handlebar mustache, poses in front of a museum diorama. A third, with a long brown beard, sits at a desk surrounded by an overstuffed bookcase, a safari hat and a giant pine cone. But wait. Something in that last image looks amiss. The cheekbones are smooth, pale. And is that an elegant pashmina scarf wrapped around the scientist’s narrow shoulders? Hmmmm ... The 38 large-format photographs that hang in the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., are part of “The Bearded Lady Project,” a tongue-in-cheek traveling [...]

By | 2020-03-03T08:27:58-08:00 March 1st, 2020|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Do women scientists need to wear fake beards to be taken seriously?

How does it make any sense to click away our right to privacy?

The Hill Originally Posted: February 27, 2020 Robert J. Howell is the chair of the Philosophy Department at Southern Methodist University, Dallas, and is head of the SMU Technology, Society and Value Project. There is little doubt that privacy clauses and terms of service agreements don’t support the moral burden they are meant to carry. All too often they are designed to provide political cover rather than to generate informed consent. Not only does no one read them, but even if someone did and had the attention span and intelligence to follow them, it’s doubtful that they would find all the policies hidden in documents several clicks deep. Interesting fact: If the average American actually read all the policies they encountered, they would lose 76 [...]

By | 2020-02-27T11:06:19-08:00 February 27th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Philosophy|Comments Off on How does it make any sense to click away our right to privacy?

Could George Washington Be Elected Today?

Psychology Today Originally Posted: Feb. 16, 2020 George Washington won his two terms in office as president with the unanimous consent of the Electoral College. In fact, he ran unopposed. What made him so popular? Although Washington was the commander in chief of the Continental Army, he wasn’t the best general in the Continental army. And while not a dullard, many of his contemporaries were far smarter than he. And although he was the president of the Constitutional Convention, he was far from the best politician. Washington’s popularity rested elsewhere. Some context helps understand Washington’s great appeal. The country had won its independence from Great Britain and no one wanted to return to a regime of tyranny. So the original conglomeration of states formed the [...]

By | 2020-02-26T09:17:37-08:00 February 26th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Could George Washington Be Elected Today?

Good Tech, Bad Tech: The Ethics of Emerging Technologies

goodtechbadtech.com Originally Posted: Feb. 24, 2020 Ken Daley, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Philosophy writes on the ethics of emerging technology in his blog Good Tech, Bad Tech. His latest post discusses the issue of personalization and the online experience. To read the details of this article or any others on his blog, click here.

By | 2020-02-24T08:25:44-08:00 February 24th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Philosophy|Comments Off on Good Tech, Bad Tech: The Ethics of Emerging Technologies

Geologist James Quick named Dean of SMU Graduate School

Dallas Weekly Originally Posted: Feb. 18, 2020 Distinguished geoscientist James Quick will open the doors to a new era of research and interdisciplinary collaboration as Inaugural Dean of SMU’s newly created Moody School of Graduate and Advanced Studies. SMU announced the creation of the Moody School in November 2019, made possible by a landmark $100 million gift from the Moody Foundation. The investment in graduate-level education is fueling SMU’s move to join the finest universities in the country in its development of research with impact, delivered by top-notch faculty and graduate students. Quick, a volcanologist of international stature, joined SMU in 2007 as the University’s first Associate Vice President for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies, with the responsibilities of supporting increases in research activity and the [...]

By | 2020-02-18T08:09:37-08:00 February 18th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Geologist James Quick named Dean of SMU Graduate School
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