Jill DeTemple is teaching local students and faculty nationwide how to effectively navigate hot-button topics

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: October 17, 2019 I don’t know about you, but the sorry state of what passes for debate these days — hair-trigger anger and social media carpet-bombing — beats me into believing that thoughtful discussion about life’s toughest stuff is dead and gone. Too often, I wind up feeling timid, tentative or just plain tired-head around hot-button issues. That’s why I went back to college last week to look into what I had heard were powerful efforts by one professor and her students to revive civil discourse. I didn’t find a magic potion for what ails society, but I did come back with better ideas on how to reengage. The timing couldn’t have been better, given the hotbed of political emotions [...]

By | 2019-10-17T08:42:50-07:00 October 17th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Religious Studies|Comments Off on Jill DeTemple is teaching local students and faculty nationwide how to effectively navigate hot-button topics

The (Lack of) Science Behind Time-Outs As a Tool to Discipline Children

Time Originally Posted: October 15, 2019 George Holden, chair of the Department of Psychology at Southern Methodist University was quoted in this article When Amy and Steve Unruh decided to adopt a four-year-old child from the Philippines, they anticipated challenges. They understood it would take time, as well as a great deal of love and care, for their family and its newest member to adjust. But they were committed to helping a child in need. The Unruh’s were blindsided when their adoption application was turned down. The reason, they were told, was that their parenting style was not suitable for an adopted child. “They said it was because we’ve used time-outs with our daughter,” says Amy Unruh, 43, who is a stay-at-home mom in Milton, [...]

By | 2019-10-15T09:27:35-07:00 October 15th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on The (Lack of) Science Behind Time-Outs As a Tool to Discipline Children

Researchers unveil new volcanic eruption forecasting technique

SMU News Originally Posted: September 12, 2019 Volcanic eruptions and their ash clouds pose a significant hazard to population centers and air travel, especially those that show few to no signs of unrest beforehand. Geologists are now using a technique traditionally used in weather and climate forecasting to develop new eruption forecasting models. By testing if the models are able to capture the likelihood of past eruptions, the researchers are making strides in the science of volcanic forecasting. The study, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, examined the eruption history of the Okmok volcano in Alaska. In 2008, a large eruption produced an ash plume that extended approximately 1 mile into the sky over the Aleutian Islands – posing a significant hazard to aircraft engines along [...]

By | 2019-10-07T08:43:49-07:00 October 9th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences|Comments Off on Researchers unveil new volcanic eruption forecasting technique

12 Surprising Facts About the Legislative Branch

The History Channel Originally Posted: October 3, 2019 The executive branch enforces laws. The judicial branch interprets laws. But it is in the law-making legislative branch, says Howard Schweber, a political science professor at the University of Wisconsin, “that the people deliberate and arrive at an agreement about the common good.” When writing the U.S. Constitution, the framers built in three branches of federal government to ensure a separation of powers, and, as Article I states, “All legislative powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.” “The point of the Constitution was to replace a system in which the national government could only make laws that affected states in their relations with one another,” Schweber says. [...]

By | 2019-10-07T08:35:10-07:00 October 7th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on 12 Surprising Facts About the Legislative Branch

Why do birds migrate at night?

SMU Research Originally Posted: September 12, 2019 Migratory birds are known to rely on Earth's magnetic field to help them navigate the globe. And it was suspected that a protein called cryptochrome, which is sensitive to blue light, was making it possible for birds to do this. Yet many of these animals are also known to migrate at night when there isn't much light available. So it wasn't clear how cryptochrome would function under these conditions in birds. A new study led by UT Southwestern Medical Center in collaboration with SMU (Southern Methodist University), though, may have figured out the answer to that puzzle. Researchers found that cryptochromes from migratory birds have evolved a mechanism that enhances their ability to respond to light, which can [...]

By | 2019-09-24T11:07:52-07:00 September 26th, 2019|Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Why do birds migrate at night?

Great Expectations

Inside Higher Ed Originally Posted: September 10, 2019 Jo Guldi learns a lesson from students who embrace the challenge of high academic standards. At midterm, half of the class was failing. I had encouraged everyone to come to my office hours, and so they did, flooding in to ask questions and complain. At least one of my student visitors presented outrage at the way he had been treated and said he wanted me to account for the grades. The particular subject of his outrage was my standard of clear, well-supported, written argumentation. "We're supposed to be learning about history, not about writing," complained my student. I was taken aback. I briefly considered wrangling with his assumption that historical understanding and clear writing could be divorced, [...]

By | 2019-09-24T10:58:09-07:00 September 24th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Great Expectations

Advertisement/Position Announcement: Assistant Professor (tenure-track)

Rank/Title Assistant Professor (tenure-track)   (Position Number     00006034) Statistical Science.   Position # 00006034  The Department of Statistical Science at Southern Methodist University (SMU) invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor beginning Fall 2020. Candidates must hold a PhD in statistics, biostatistics, or related discipline at the time of the appointment. Evidence of excellence in teaching at undergraduate and graduate levels is highly desirable. The successful candidate must demonstrate the potential to develop an agenda of independent and collaborative research, and to attract extramural funding. Although we will consider applicants from all sub-disciplines of statistical science, we will give special attention to those with interests at the interface between statistics and computing. Applications must be submitted via Interfolio at http://apply.interfolio.com/68537 in one single pdf file and should include a cover letter, [...]

By | 2019-10-07T07:47:29-07:00 September 20th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Statistical Science|Comments Off on Advertisement/Position Announcement: Assistant Professor (tenure-track)

How we can use the art of listening to heal the divisions in our country.

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: Septemeber 11, 2019 Jill DeTemple is associate professor of religious studies at Southern Methodist University and a faculty associate at Essential Partners. She wrote this column for The Dallas Morning News. It's not too late to start listening. Giving ear and respect to other perspectives builds trust and a sense of community we have lost and desperately hope to regain. There's an opportunity to do this in classrooms, living rooms and assembly rooms. It starts with setting the stage and ground rules to promote honest and safe dialogue. It continues with free-flowing exchanges after we take a chance and learn why others believe what they believe. "I used to joke that I was a passive anarchist waiting for civilization to [...]

By | 2019-09-18T07:23:58-07:00 September 18th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Religious Studies|Comments Off on How we can use the art of listening to heal the divisions in our country.

What Princes and Princesses are Teaching Our Kids

DFW Child Originally Posted: September 3, 2019 Martha Satz, Assistant Professor in the English Department was interviewed for this article. Skyla is absolutely over the moon about princesses. The North Texas 5-year-old not only dresses up like the characters and enjoys the movies, but she has also attended parties alongside her aunt, a professional party entertainer who appears at events as princess characters. But type “princess culture” into Google, and you’re sure to find a slew of articles declaring how bad princesses are for kids like Skyla: “Why Disney princesses and ‘princess culture’ are bad for girls.” “Can Disney fix its broken ‘princess culture’?” “Study finds Disney princess culture magnifies stereotypes in young girls.” So are there really so many negative effects resulting from our kids’ obsession with princesses? INNER BEAUTY? When we show [...]

By | 2019-09-10T11:08:12-07:00 September 12th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, English|Comments Off on What Princes and Princesses are Teaching Our Kids

Listen: A Better Place In A Warming World

KERA Originally Posted: September 3, 2019 In the discussions about how to mitigate climate change, two important factors are largely ignored: migration and trade. Southern Methodist University professor Klaus Desmet talks to host Krys Boyd about the importance of strategizing long term solutions for commerce and conservation, which he writes about in The Catalyst. LISTEN

By | 2019-09-04T07:49:45-07:00 September 4th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Listen: A Better Place In A Warming World
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