An SMU Poet Brings a New Form of Storytelling to Your Phone

D Magazine January 2020 For Greg Brownderville, poetry teacher at SMU and editor of the lauded literary journal Southwest Review, making art means elevating the everyday, recontextualizing the routine. How might someone do that with the digital experience people have on their phones? Brownderville’s response: the “go-show,” a new way of storytelling on the small screen. With grants from SMU, he and a team of roughly 35 mainly Texas-based artists, including Bart Weiss, creator of Dallas VideoFest, will launch their first go-show in the days ahead. The go-show is an app that delivers episodes via notifications over the course of several weeks. But unlike, say, podcasts, which use only audio to tell a story, the go-show uses short films, still images, songs, podcasts, text, and [...]

By | 2020-01-22T09:46:26-08:00 January 21st, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, English, Faculty News|Comments Off on An SMU Poet Brings a New Form of Storytelling to Your Phone

Want to work for the State Department? Here’s how.

Tower Center Originally Posted: November 25, 2019 Diplomat-in-Residence, Kathryn Crockart, came to SMU to present information on how to apply for a career at the U.S. Department of State. The Department of State is the diplomatic wing of the federal government, handling foreign affairs and the promotion of American foreign policy throughout the world. As the lead foreign affairs agency, the Department of State represents the U.S. at embassies, consulates, and missions to international organizations around the world. With 70,672 employees in 275 posts in 190 countries, the Department of State has many diverse career paths and opportunities; no career is the same. READ MORE

By | 2020-01-13T09:21:05-08:00 January 10th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Tower Center|Comments Off on Want to work for the State Department? Here’s how.

Teaching Innovation

SMU Stories Tracking history through algorithms – using an iconic childhood toy to demonstrate physics – trading traditional diversity training for real communication skills – storytelling. SMU professors bring innovative tools and techniques to wherever the students are. And it only starts in the classroom. READ MORE

By | 2020-01-07T08:30:21-08:00 January 7th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History, Physics|Comments Off on Teaching Innovation

Alexis McCrossen, History, featured in Time

Time Originally posted: Dec. 27, 2019 “‘Hiring Day’ was part of the larger economic cycle in which most debts were collected and settled on New Year’s Day,” says Alexis McCrossen, an expert on the history of New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day and a professor of history at Southern Methodist University, who writes about Hiring Day in her forthcoming book Time’s Touchstone: The New Year in American Life. Americans are likely to think of New Year’s Eve and New Year’s Day as a time to celebrate the fresh start that a new year represents, but there is also a troubling side to the holiday’s history. In the years before the Civil War, the first day of the new year was often a heartbreaking one [...]

By | 2020-01-02T08:34:52-08:00 January 2nd, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History|Comments Off on Alexis McCrossen, History, featured in Time

Fox Host Brian Kilmeade’s New Book About the Alamo Isn’t Fair and Balanced

Texas Monthly Originally Posted: December 11, 2019 Andrew R. Graybill is professor of history and director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University. On the eve of the publication of his new book about the Texas Revolution, Brian Kilmeade gave a promotional interview to his Fox News colleague Tucker Carlson. “All they wanted was a shot at success,” he said of the Anglo settlers who in the 1820s and 1830s flocked to what was then northern Mexico. “[T]hey said, ‘I’ll be a part of Mexico as long as you give us freedom and liberty.’” But, as Kilmeade explained to Carlson, when the Mexican government abrogated what the Americans believed were their rights—including unfettered immigration from the United States and [...]

By | 2019-12-12T09:09:49-08:00 December 12th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Fox Host Brian Kilmeade’s New Book About the Alamo Isn’t Fair and Balanced

What happened to the fossil on display at DFW Airport? Curious Texas digs up the answer

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: Nov. 27, 2019 When DFW International Airport was being built in the 1970s, construction crews found the bones of a 70 million-year-old sea monster. Well, it wasn’t a monster exactly, but a 25-foot long plesiosaur, a large dinosaur with a body similar to a lizard’s but with flippers like those on a porpoise. It was one of many that roamed North Texas when water covered the land millions of years ago. The nearly 10,000-pound fossil was put on display between Gates 10 and 11 at the Braniff International terminal at DFW Airport in 1975, and it remained there even after Braniff Airways ceased operations in May 1982. The artifact later was moved again, and in the mid-2010s, the plesiosaur was [...]

By | 2019-11-27T09:28:56-08:00 November 30th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on What happened to the fossil on display at DFW Airport? Curious Texas digs up the answer

Americans remain split on impeachment after public hearings begin, poll says

PBS News Originally Posted: Nov. 19, 2019 Presidential historian Jeffrey Engel was quoted in this article. Days into public impeachment hearings, nearly half of Americans want Congress to impeach President Donald Trump and remove him from office, according to a new poll from the PBS NewsHour, NPR and Marist. The latest data does not show a significant change in public attitudes since the hearings began last Wednesday. But this next round of testimony could give Democrats more chances to sway public opinion — unless Americans stick to already rigid partisan lines. Among U.S. adults, 45 percent said they support the impeachment and the ouster of Trump from office, with 82 percent of Democrats, 39 percent of politically independent voters and 7 percent of Republicans approving such [...]

By | 2019-11-19T09:16:41-08:00 November 19th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Americans remain split on impeachment after public hearings begin, poll says

Historian Jeffrey Engel Takes Listener Questions On Impeachment Inquiry

NPR Originally Posted: Nov. 17, 2019 NPR's Michel Martin poses listener questions about the impeachment inquiry to historian Jeffrey Engel, co-author of Impeachment: An American History. READ MORE

By | 2019-11-19T09:19:44-08:00 November 17th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Historian Jeffrey Engel Takes Listener Questions On Impeachment Inquiry
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