TODAY: Understanding and Promoting Minority Mental Health: Virtual Reality, Community-engaged Focus Groups, and Beyond… With Dr. Pricilla Lui, Assistant Professor of Psychology

Date: Wednesday, June 16, 2021 Time: 12:00pm - 1:00pm REGISTER HERE Harold Simmons 117 or by Zoom. Dr. Lui conducts research on minority mental health and health disparities.She is interested in how people from diverse sociocultural backgrounds make sense of the world, and how their lived experiences associated with culture, ethnicity, and race affect their psychopathology and addictive behaviors.Using a social ecological framework, she studies intercultural contact (e.g., acculturation, discrimination), close social relationships (e.g., romantic relationship, intergenerational conflict), and intrapersonal characteristics (e.g., personality, cultural orientations) as determinants of psychopathology, primarily alcohol (mis)use. Through this program of research, Dr. Lui  seeks to inform and influence clinical interventions that are most effective in alleviating distress and improving psychological functioning across diverse ethnocultural groups.To the extent that knowledge on the prediction and explanation of human psychology only is as good as [...]

By | 2021-06-16T07:52:15-07:00 June 16th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on TODAY: Understanding and Promoting Minority Mental Health: Virtual Reality, Community-engaged Focus Groups, and Beyond… With Dr. Pricilla Lui, Assistant Professor of Psychology

The mysterious muon could point physicists to a scientific revolution

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: June 13, 2021 One of my favorite quotes about science comes not from a practicing scientist but from a comedian, Dara O’Briain. He brilliantly summarized the whole point of science and how it makes progress: “Science knows it doesn’t know everything, otherwise it would just stop.” Physicists, those scientists who study energy, matter, space and time, have just discovered a vast gap in their knowledge thanks to the unpredictable behavior of the tiniest-of-tiny particles, the muon. And if history is repeated, the new generation of physicists will discover pathbreaking ideas that could lead to revolutionary technology. Like all science, physics advances because scientists come to know what they don’t know. A great example of this happened at the end of [...]

By | 2021-06-14T06:22:33-07:00 June 13th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on The mysterious muon could point physicists to a scientific revolution

Congratulations to Bonnie Wheeler

Dedman College News Originally Posted: June 1, 2021 Bonnie Wheeler, Associate Professor of English and Director of Medieval Studies received the Norris J. Lacy Prize for Outstanding Editorial Achievement in Arthurian Studies at the 2021 Virtual Annual International Congress on Medieval Studies, the International Arthurian Society—North American Branch. This award was in recognition of Bonnie’s extensive editorial work and mentoring of fellow scholars in Medieval Studies, especially in Arthurian Studies. In addition, Bonnie received the Grail Award for Lifetime Service to Arthurian Studies in recognition of her career achievements and in many sub-fields of medieval studies. To quote from the citation: Bonnie has received numerous honors over the course of her career. She’s a six-time winner of SMU’s Outstanding Teacher Award, and has been elected to many leadership [...]

By | 2021-06-02T09:09:26-07:00 June 2nd, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, English, Faculty News|Comments Off on Congratulations to Bonnie Wheeler

Opinion: Rituals can guide us in our post-pandemic worlds

Austin American Citizen Originally Posted: May 29, 2021 Jill DeTemple, religious studies professor at SMU Dallas, for a piece advocating how rituals can help individuals and communities navigate their post-pandemic worlds. Published in the Austin American-Statesman with the heading Rituals can guide us in our post-pandemic worlds: https://bit.ly/3yVA1zi About a week ago, at the top of the stairs in the three-story building where I work on the SMU campus, two women were in lively conversation as they worked to remove markers and yards of tape laid down to keep us safely apart in the pandemic. They scraped and scrubbed, and at the end of the day the blue line dividing our staircase and hallways, the directional arrows and X’s meant to prohibit sitting too closely to another, were gone. Despite [...]

By | 2021-06-01T08:21:19-07:00 June 1st, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Religious Studies|Comments Off on Opinion: Rituals can guide us in our post-pandemic worlds

SMU professor receives NASA funding to study distant galaxies built around massive black holes

SMU News Originally Posted: May 18, 2021 DALLAS (SMU) – Krista Lynne Smith, an assistant professor of physics at SMU, has received a grant from NASA to study one of the most extreme objects in the universe – Active Galactic Nuclei. These objects, called AGN for short, are galaxies with a central supermassive black hole feeding on gas from what’s called an accretion disk. The two-year grant of $215,000 will allow Smith to analyze data from NASA’s Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) to answer a variety of questions about Active Galactic Nuclei and the gas that fuels them. Learning more about these extreme objects could shed light on the behavior of matter in the deeply warped spacetime around black holes and the processes by which black holes emit powerful jets into their host galaxies. TESS is [...]

By | 2021-05-26T06:55:34-07:00 May 26th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on SMU professor receives NASA funding to study distant galaxies built around massive black holes

AHA Member Spotlight: JOHN R. CHÁVEZ

Perspectives on History Originally Posted: May 25, 2021 John R. Chávez is a professor of history at Southern Methodist University. He lives in Garland, Texas, and has been a member since 2001. Website: smu.edu/Dedman/Academics/Departments/History/People/FacultyStaff/JohnRC Alma maters: BA (English), California State University, Los Angeles, 1971; BA (Spanish), California State University, Los Angeles, 1975; MA (English), California State University, Los Angeles, 1972; MA (American culture), University of Michigan, 1978; PhD (American culture), University of Michigan, 1980 Fields of Interest: ethnic Mexico, Southwestern borderlands, colonialism, United States, North Atlantic Describe your career path. What led you to where you are today? Chicano and Black student activism during the 1960s and 1970s opened up opportunities for the study of minority communities that had not existed before. The Black Action Movement at [...]

By | 2021-05-26T06:32:33-07:00 May 26th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on AHA Member Spotlight: JOHN R. CHÁVEZ

New duck-billed dinosaur species discovered in Japan

The Hill Originally Posted: April 27, 2021 A new type of duck-billed dinosaur has been identified on one of Japan’s southern islands. In 2004, an amatuer fossil hunter found the preserved lower jaw, teeth, neck vertebrae, shoulder bone and tail vertebra in an approximately 72-million-year-old layer of sediment on Japan’s Awaji island. The fossil was given to Japan’s Museum of Nature and Human Activities where it was stored before being studied by an international team of researchers from Southern Methodist University (SMU) and Japan. In a study recently published in Scientific Reports, researchers now say the specimen is that of a new genus and species of hadrosaur, or duck-billed dinosaur, they’ve dubbed Yamatosaurus izanagii. The plant-eating hadrosaurs roamed the Earth during the Late Cretaceous period [...]

By | 2021-06-03T06:27:02-07:00 May 24th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on New duck-billed dinosaur species discovered in Japan

SMU professor receives NASA funding to study Active Galactic Nuclei

EurekAlert Originally Posted: May 19, 2021 Krista Lynne Smith, an assistant professor of physics at SMU, has received a grant from NASA to study one of the most extreme objects in the universe - Active Galactic Nuclei. These objects, called AGN for short, are galaxies with a central supermassive black hole feeding on gas from what's called an accretion disk. The two-year grant of $215,000 will allow Smith to analyze data from NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) to answer a variety of questions about Active Galactic Nuclei and the gas that fuels them. Learning more about these extreme objects could shed light on the behavior of matter in the deeply warped spacetime around black holes and the processes by which black holes emit powerful [...]

By | 2021-05-19T08:24:52-07:00 May 19th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on SMU professor receives NASA funding to study Active Galactic Nuclei

Congratulations to Johan Elverskog, 2021-22 Berlin Prize Fellow

American Academy in Berlin Posted: May 12, 2021 The American Academy in Berlin has granted twenty-two Berlin Prizes for fall 2021 and spring 2022. The Berlin Prize is awarded annually to American or US-based scholars, writers, composers, and artists who represent the highest standards of excellence in their fields, from the humanities and social sciences to journalism, public policy, fiction, the visual arts, and music composition. Fellows spend a semester at the Academy’s lakeside Hans Arnhold Center, a historic nineteenth-century villa located in Berlin’s Wannsee district. Chosen by an independent selection committee, the 2021-22 class of fellows will pursue a wide array of scholarly and artistic projects, including histories of the legalities of small wars among European empires, the Visigothic political order, competing conceptions of [...]

By | 2021-05-12T07:26:17-07:00 May 12th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Religious Studies|Comments Off on Congratulations to Johan Elverskog, 2021-22 Berlin Prize Fellow

My college years were in the tumultuous 1960s. Graduates today must keep idealism alive.

USA Today Originally Posted: May 9, 2021 “I anticipate many of my students in the Southern Methodist University Human Rights Program, where I teach, will remain active in social justice causes for Black Lives Matter, women’s and LGBTQ rights, anti-hate activism, and beyond.” Rick Halperin, director of the SMU Dallas Human Rights Program, contemplates the future of his graduating human rights scholars while recalling his personal journey of protests as an undergraduate 50 years ago. Published in USA Today https://www.usatoday.com/.../college.../4942261001/

By | 2021-05-10T10:50:15-07:00 May 10th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Embrey Human Rights Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on My college years were in the tumultuous 1960s. Graduates today must keep idealism alive.
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