Department of Economics PH.D info session for undergraduate students

SMU Department of Economics Event: September 27 Time: 7:30-9PM Location: Zoom Dr. James Lake, the Director of Doctoral Programs & Professor of Economics at SMU will be hosting an Economics Ph.D. Info session virtually on Monday, September 27 from 7:30-9PM. Please see the flyer below for more information. All majors are welcome to attend.

By | 2021-09-14T09:53:46-07:00 September 14th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News, Graduate News, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Department of Economics PH.D info session for undergraduate students

2020 and 2021 Faculty Career Achievement Award Celebration

SMU News Originally Posted: September 12, 2021 This week, President Turner and Provost Loboa welcomed community members and distinguished guests to a ceremony honoring Dr. Caroline Brettell, University Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, and Dr. Tom Fomby, Professor of Economics as the 2020 and 2021 recipients of SMU’s Faculty Career Achievement Award.  The Faculty Career Achievement Award was established in 2015, and during our Second Century Campaign, to recognize remarkable contributions across the scope of a career by a current tenured SMU faculty member to the teaching, scholarship and service missions of the University. In extraordinary ways, spanning nearly four decades, Doctors Brettell and Fomby exemplify SMU’s scholarly and creative aspirations. They are precisely the type of faculty members who have – and will continue to [...]

By | 2021-09-12T19:24:47-07:00 September 12th, 2021|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on 2020 and 2021 Faculty Career Achievement Award Celebration

Big D is a Big Deal

City Journal Originally Posted: Sept 6, 2021 Located on the Southern Plains, far from America’s coasts and great river systems, the Dallas–Fort Worth metropolitan area epitomizes the new trends in American urbanism. Over the past decade, DFW has grown by some 1.3 million people, to reach a population of just under 7.7 million, making it the nation’s fourth-largest metro, based on new figures from the 2020 census. Rather than building on natural advantages, the metroplex owes its tremendous growth to railroads, interstate highways, and airports, plus an unusual degree of economic freedom and affordability. There’s an adage in Texas about a braggart being someone who’s “all hat and no cattle.” But you can’t say that about “Big D,” rapidly emerging as the de facto capital [...]

By | 2021-09-07T07:12:47-07:00 September 7th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Big D is a Big Deal

Titan’s Strange Chemical World Gets Simulated in Tiny Tubes

Wired Originally Posted: August 27, 2021 A research chemist mixed nitrogen, methane, and other molecules to re-create the conditions that might harbor life on one of Saturn’s moons. THE LANDSCAPE OF Titan, Saturn’s largest moon, is both familiar and strange. Like Earth, Titan has rivers, lakes, clouds, and falling raindrops, as well as mountains of ice and a thick atmosphere. But instead of water, Titan’s chemical cycle is composed of liquid methane, an organic molecule made from one carbon and four hydrogen atoms. Researchers believe this swirling mixture of methane, combined with the moon’s nitrogen-laden atmosphere, surface water ice, and maybe some energy from either a volcano or a meteor impact, might have been the perfect recipe to create some kind of simple life form. [...]

By | 2021-09-03T14:48:16-07:00 September 3rd, 2021|Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Titan’s Strange Chemical World Gets Simulated in Tiny Tubes

Washington Post quotes English Professor, Ezra Greenspan

Washington Post Originally Posted: Aug. 23, 2021 Black cemetery headstones were used as scrap. Now area leaders are ‘righting a wrong’: The governors of Maryland and Virginia and D.C.’s mayor gathered at the site where the headstones were dumped as scrap decades ago. By: Schneider, Gregory S. KING GEORGE COUNTY, Va. — The broken remnants of headstones representing 55 lives — some famous, some forgotten — lay on rough wooden pallets Monday as the leaders of Virginia, Maryland and D.C. spoke of atonement. "This is really about righting a wrong," said Virginia Gov. Ralph Northam (D). "It's a disgraceful, heartbreaking chapter in our history," said Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan (R). "What we are really talking about is how we will tell the story of this [...]

By | 2021-08-31T07:36:11-07:00 August 31st, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, English, Faculty News|Comments Off on Washington Post quotes English Professor, Ezra Greenspan

Congratulations to Samantha Mabry

Dedman College News Originally Posted: Aug. 31, 2021 Congratulations to Samantha Mabry.   Her novel All the Wind in the World was long-listed for the 2017 National Book Award, and just recently announced that Tigers, Not Daughters, her latest novel, has won the Writers’ League of Texas annual award for YA fiction. Read the editorial reviews. Samantha Mabry is a full-time lecturer in the Writing and Reasoning Program.

By | 2021-08-31T07:20:08-07:00 August 31st, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, English, Faculty News|Comments Off on Congratulations to Samantha Mabry

Meet Dallas-Fort Worth’s newest crop of high risk/high impact cancer researchers

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: Aug 30, 2021 The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas is gambling on scientists with big ideas and even bigger potential. Uttam Tambar knew his research could flop. “This is going to sound like a crazy idea,” he said in an email to co-worker Bruce Posner last fall about a potential grant proposal to the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas. A self-proclaimed big-picture guy, thinking unconventionally and taking risks is expected of the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center biomedical scientist. His proposal did seem crazy, at least at first glance. He wanted to use high-throughput technology in Posner’s lab to find new molecules, called protein degraders, at a pace that’s never been done before. If the [...]

By | 2021-08-30T14:26:52-07:00 August 30th, 2021|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Meet Dallas-Fort Worth’s newest crop of high risk/high impact cancer researchers

Researchers at SMU Discover More Effective Treatment Options For Cervical Cancer

KERA Originally Post4ed: Aug. 26, 2021 LISTEN Researchers at Southern Methodist University (SMU) have discovered a way to more effectively treat cervical cancer with lower chemotherapy doses and fewer side effects. The key is a protein called TIGAR, which is found in various forms of cancer cells, including cervical cancer cells. Researchers found that if they decreased the TIGAR protein, it made the cells hypersensitive to chemotherapy treatments. In the long run, this could mean a shorter period of treatment for patients and fewer side effects to healthy cells in their bodies. Robert Harrod, a biological sciences professor at SMU who runs a lab, has seen this project evolve over a few decades. “We're finding out something new every day, putting in new pieces of [...]

By | 2021-08-27T06:55:25-07:00 August 27th, 2021|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Researchers at SMU Discover More Effective Treatment Options For Cervical Cancer

Welcome Back!

Originally Posted: Aug 23, 2021 Welcome back, Mustangs! Can't wait to see you in class!

Historian Ed Countryman lends expertise to The Guardian

The Guardian Originally Posted: August 13, 2021 One history textbook exclusively refers to immigrants as “aliens”. Another blames the Black Lives Matter movement for strife between communities and police officers. A third discusses the prevalence of “black supremacist” organizations during the civil rights movement, calling Malcolm X the most prominent “black supremacist” of the era. Legislatures and boards of education around the US are currently engaging in acrimonious battles about how issues of race and equity are taught in public K-12 classrooms – the latest culture war in a decades-long fight around whose stories and contributions get highlighted in school. But largely left out of this conversation has been the education provided in private schools, thousands of which have quietly been excluding diverse voices and [...]

By | 2021-08-25T14:21:12-07:00 August 19th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Historian Ed Countryman lends expertise to The Guardian
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