What white parents get wrong about raising antiracist kids — and how to get it right

Washington Post Originally Posted: June 25, 2020 The world feels broken right now — not just cracked in a few places but shattered in a million pieces. It’s been this way for centuries, of course, but many Americans — white Americans — are just starting to wake up and grapple with the depth of this country’s deeply rooted racism, as well as the role they played in making it so. As a white parent, I feel a deep responsibility to provide my children with the tools and awareness to help rebuild our society into something better. I know I’m not alone, but I also know many white parents don’t know how or where to start. Research suggests that we need to confront our unfounded assumptions [...]

By | 2020-06-30T09:46:56-07:00 July 9th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on What white parents get wrong about raising antiracist kids — and how to get it right

When memory and justice fail us

The Hill Originally Post: June 20, 2020 Holly Bowen is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at SMU Dallas where she teaches and directs research on topics including memory, emotion, motivation and aging. Think back to the last time you went on a mission to stock up on supplies due to COVID-19. What route did you take around the store? Can you describe the employee who bagged your groceries? What was the make and model of the car parked next to you? It’s likely this memory is difficult to retrieve and the details surrounding it have faded. After all, this was a stressful and uncertain time and your focus might have been elsewhere. It was some time ago and you have probably forgotten. Now, [...]

By | 2020-06-22T06:15:23-07:00 June 22nd, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on When memory and justice fail us

Activism usually linked to urban centers finds a voice in the frustrations of rapidly changing communities.

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: June 8, 2020 For the seventh day in a row, dozens of sign-waving suburbanites dotted a busy corner in Flower Mound last week, demanding racial equality and decrying police brutality on what seemed unlikely soil as passing motorists honked in support. In this 80% white, Denton County city of 80,000, they’d united in response to the very public death of George Floyd, who died May 25 in the custody of Minneapolis police, an incident that has spawned significant national unrest. “George Floyd’s life was extinguished on camera for the world to see,” said Laura Haines, a white resident who has been among those gathered daily at Long Prairie and Cross Timbers roads. “We’re all seeing what black people have been [...]

By | 2020-06-17T09:59:00-07:00 June 12th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Sociology, Sociology (Faculty)|Comments Off on Activism usually linked to urban centers finds a voice in the frustrations of rapidly changing communities.

The myth of diminished learning during quarantine

Jewish Post Originally Posted: May 29, 2020 As a professor at SMU Dallas, I am saddened by mainstream media’s myopic view of pandemic-induced online education. Whether it be op-eds about students receiving inferior educations in virtual classrooms or stories about parents suing colleges for “not getting their money’s worth,” public discourse lacks an alternative perspective. My own experience is quite the opposite. I witnessed an increase in student engagement and performance in my admittedly small classes afforded by a private university for my students who were unburdened by medical or socio-economic stress. My experience is not isolated but is echoed anecdotally by numerous colleagues in various parts of the nation. Deprived of non-academic distractions, many of my students became virtually monastic (pun intended). With more [...]

By | 2020-05-29T09:59:31-07:00 May 29th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Jewish Studies Program, Jewish Studies Program|Comments Off on The myth of diminished learning during quarantine

Gamers join scientific research to help end the COVID-19 threat

Dallas Innovates Originally Posted: May 20, 2020 DALLAS (SMU) - While medical professionals everywhere have been hard at work for months searching for a cure to the COVID-19 virus, an unlikely industry has emerged to join the fight: the video game community, Dallas Innovates’ Alex Edwards reports. A new effort from BALANCED Media|Technology (BALANCED) and Complexity Gaming intends to garner spare computer processing power that could help find treatments for coronavirus. The two Dallas-based organizations are encouraging anyone that works with video games to donate to the citizen science/crowdsourcing initiative called #WeAreHEWMEN, Edwards explains. The BALANCED’s HEWMAN app will use gamers’ processing power to go through more than 200,000 FDA medications and compounds, with help from SMU computational biologist John Wise. Using these 200,000 compounds, between 1.5 to 3 million virtual [...]

By | 2020-05-27T10:30:22-07:00 May 27th, 2020|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Gamers join scientific research to help end the COVID-19 threat

‘Bored’ seismologists find a new hobby: Tracking silence

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: May 21, 2020 If you’ve been noticing more birds chirping and more frogs singing, it’s probably not your imagination. Noise created by humans, such as car and truck traffic, quieted by about 30 percent between late March, when Gov. Greg Abbott closed schools and restaurants across Texas, and early May, according to a new analysis by researchers at Southern Methodist University. “There was quite a big change in some areas,” said Stephen Arrowsmith, a seismologist at SMU, who took on the project with a class of undergraduate and graduate students this spring. READ MORE

By | 2020-05-22T08:55:44-07:00 May 22nd, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on ‘Bored’ seismologists find a new hobby: Tracking silence

How SMU computer science professors are using their resources to help find a coronavirus vaccine

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: April 24, 2020 Frederick R. Chang is a cyber security professor, chair of the Department of Computer Science at Southern Methodist University and the founding director of the SMU AI Lab. Jo Guldi is an associate professor of history at SMU, where she teaches text mining and is a founding member of the SMU AI Lab. They wrote this column for The Dallas Morning News. What if university computer scientists, biologists and historians collaborated to use modern artificial intelligence and machine learning to examine a massive trove of infectious disease research papers, text mining for abstract patterns, elusive insights and hard-to-spot trends related to COVID-19 and the coronavirus family of viruses? Imagine the energy such a group could generate if their students, [...]

By | 2020-04-24T12:39:24-07:00 April 24th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on How SMU computer science professors are using their resources to help find a coronavirus vaccine

Questions for Connection and Purpose

Inside Higher Ed April 22, 2020 We need to be intentional and consistent in creating spaces in our classes for students to engage with the evolving world around them, write Jill DeTemple and John Sarrouf, who provide suggestions to help instructors do so. Twice last year, one of us -- Jill, a professor at Southern Methodist University -- walked into classes populated by students who were acutely aware of horror. They wrote in discussion posts in real and profoundly personal ways about feeling helpless, and hopeless, in the wake of the Tree of Life synagogue shooting and the New Zealand mosque attack. As they studied philosophical, comparative and social scientific approaches to religion, students wanted -- needed -- some way to make sense of their [...]

By | 2020-04-22T06:19:35-07:00 April 22nd, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Religious Studies|Comments Off on Questions for Connection and Purpose

Scott-Hawkins Lecture Fund Now Accepting Applications for Fall 2020

DCII Originally Posted: April 15, 2020 The DCII welcomes proposals for support from the Scott-Hawkins lecture fund. The DCII is particularly interested in proposals for speakers that appeal to an interdisciplinary audience. Email dcinterdisciplinaryinstitute@smu.edu for info on applying. Link for more information: https://www.smu.edu/Dedman/Research/Institutes-and-Centers/DCII/Programs/ScottHawkins

By | 2020-04-15T08:08:39-07:00 April 15th, 2020|DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Scott-Hawkins Lecture Fund Now Accepting Applications for Fall 2020

Religious Resistance to Quarantine Has a Long History

Inside Source Originally Posted: March 10, 2020 About the Author: Bianca Lopez is a professor of Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. She wrote this for InsideSources.com. In numerous parts of the United States, certain stripes of Christianity and quarantine orders stand in direct opposition, resulting in deadly outcomes due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Ignoring or refusing to follow social distancing and stay-at-home guidelines, congregations from California to Florida have continued to assemble for worship services and thereby put themselves and their communities in peril. Examples include Sacramento County in California where more than 100 of the county’s 314 coronavirus cases are related to churches. Some of the congregations have ceased meeting in church buildings but continued to gather in homes, even [...]

By | 2020-04-13T06:12:23-07:00 April 13th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Religious Resistance to Quarantine Has a Long History
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