How do we get so many different types of neurons in our brain?

SMU Research Originally Posted: September 5, 2019 New SMU study may provide insight on how our brains are able to produce so many different types of neurons, which control everything we do DALLAS (SMU) – SMU (Southern Methodist University) researchers have discovered another layer of complexity in gene expression, which could help explain how we’re able to have so many billions of neurons in our brain. Neurons are cells inside the brain and nervous system that are responsible for everything we do, think or feel. They use electrical impulses and chemical signals to send information between different areas of the brain, and between the brain and the rest of the nervous system, to tell our body what to do. Humans have approximately 86 billion neurons [...]

By | 2019-09-09T09:30:05-07:00 September 9th, 2019|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on How do we get so many different types of neurons in our brain?

Jill. E. Kelly, South Africa: How a chief defied apartheid and upheld democracy for the good of his people

The Conversation Originally Posted: August 20, 2019 By: Jill E. Kelly, Associate Professor of History, Southern Methodist University Disclosure statement Jill E. Kelly's research has been supported by the American Council of Learned Societies (2015) and Fulbright (2010-2011, 2018-2019). The recently released report of President Cyril Ramaphosa’s advisory panel on land reform, and the latest efforts to force through two controversial traditional authority bills, point to the continued legacies of changes to the relationship between traditional leaders, their followers, and land in South Africa’s history. The panel calls for a resolution to the “contending philosophies around land tenure” — those of individual rights and those of communalism. But as traditional leaders fight to continue their control over communally held land, there also needs to be a [...]

By | 2019-09-04T07:36:28-07:00 September 4th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Jill. E. Kelly, South Africa: How a chief defied apartheid and upheld democracy for the good of his people

First people in the Americas came by sea, ancient tools unearthed by Idaho river suggest

Science Magazine Originally Posted: August 30, 2019 About 16,000 years ago, on the banks of a river in western Idaho, people kindled fires, shaped stone blades and spearpoints, and butchered large mammals. All were routine activities in prehistory, but their legacy today is anything but. The charcoal and bone left at that ancient site, now called Cooper’s Ferry, are some 16,000 years old—the oldest radiocarbon-dated record of human presence in North America, according to work reported this week in Science. The findings do more than add a few centuries to the timeline of people in the Americas. They also shore up a new picture of how humans first arrived, by showing that people lived at Cooper’s Ferry more than 1 millennium before melting glaciers opened an [...]

By | 2019-08-30T06:28:24-07:00 August 30th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on First people in the Americas came by sea, ancient tools unearthed by Idaho river suggest

People transformed the world through land use by 3,000 years ago

Eureka Alert Originally Posted: August 29, 2019 DALLAS (SMU) - Humans started making an impact on the global ecosystem through intensive farming much earlier than previously estimated, according to a new study published in the journal Science. Evidence of the earliest domesticated plants and animals dates back to around 10,000 years ago. But findings from a team of more than 250 archeologists, including two from SMU (Southern Methodist University), show that by 3,000 years ago our ancestors had dramatically changed the world to grow food. "Our study shows in detail the progression from the origins of agriculture to its spread around the world," said SMU anthropologist Mark D. McCoy. "It turns out that earth science models are probably too conservative, and intensive reshaping of the environment [...]

By | 2019-08-30T06:26:48-07:00 August 30th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on People transformed the world through land use by 3,000 years ago

Is Denton a suburb? Depends on who you ask

Denton Record-Chronicle Originally Posted: August 3, 2019 When Rolling Stone magazine first wrote about Brave Combo in 1979, the reporter said the genre-bending polka band was from Austin. From there, it was repeated again and again. Almost any media outside of North Texas writing about the group credited Austin as their home, because writers couldn’t conceive that cool music came out of other cities in the state, band founder and lead singer Carl Finch said. And thus began a nearly 40-year tradition of announcing “We’re Brave Combo from Denton, Texas” during sets near and far — as the band resisted any pressure to be lumped in with Dallas or Fort Worth. “I think that we have been so long associated with Denton pride and carrying [...]

By | 2019-08-19T08:39:36-07:00 August 20th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Sociology, Sociology (Faculty)|Comments Off on Is Denton a suburb? Depends on who you ask

Ancient Marine Fossils Unearthed in Plano

NBC 5 Originally Posted: August 8, 2019 Construction workers in Plano unearthed ancient marine fossils from a time when the city was under the sea. Crews found the fossils while working on the future Plano police substation at McDermott Road and Robinson Road. Steve Stoler, with the city of Plano, said crews only dug about seven feet into the ground before they found the fossils in a single 50-pound rock. "I don't know how many people realize this: in ancient times, this was an ocean. When you dig into the limestone shelf, it's not uncommon to find sea creatures and sea shells," Stoler said. "At the time these rocks were deposited, about 85 million years ago, Plano was submerged under a large inland sea," said [...]

By | 2019-08-08T10:35:28-07:00 August 15th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Ancient Marine Fossils Unearthed in Plano

Heather DeShon, Dedman, study finds Fort Worth basin wastewater injection increases fault-slip potential

Journal of Petroleum Technology Originally Posted: August 7, 2019 The Barnett Shale might be a play of yesteryear for the US onshore industry, but the examination of a decade’s worth of recorded activity from the birthplace of the shale revolution yields new insight on the seismic impact of wastewater injection. Findings from researchers at the University of Texas (UT), Stanford University, and Southern Methodist University (SMU) reveal that wastewater injection in the Fort Worth Basin (FWB) of North Texas “significantly increases the likelihood for faults to slip” if not managed properly, according to a UT news release. To improve understanding of fault sensitivity, the team mapped 251 faults totaling more than 1,800 miles in combined length in the FWB. Those faults mostly extend from the [...]

By | 2019-08-07T14:31:04-07:00 August 9th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Heather DeShon, Dedman, study finds Fort Worth basin wastewater injection increases fault-slip potential

What We Can Learn From the Failures of Dallas Business Leaders

D Magazine Originally Posted: August 7, 2019 Let’s start with a few discouraging statistics. The federal Small Business Administration says that about 30 percent of all new businesses fail within their first two years. Fifty percent are gone within the first five, and two-thirds don’t make it past their 10th anniversaries. Those numbers make it plain: Failure is an even more integral aspect of business than is success. Beyond that, a rise in the number of failing businesses is counter-intuitively a sign of a healthy economy. “A huge percentage of startups fail, and we should be happy about that,” says Cullum Clark, an economist at Southern Methodist University. Not for the failure of any one, he adds, but for having a system that provides for [...]

By | 2019-08-07T14:25:09-07:00 August 7th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on What We Can Learn From the Failures of Dallas Business Leaders

New map outlines seismic faults across DFW region

EurekaAlert Originally Posted: July 24, 2019 DALLAS (SMU) - Scientists from SMU, The University of Texas at Austin and Stanford University found that the majority of faults underlying the Fort Worth Basin are as sensitive to forces that could cause them to slip as those that have hosted earthquakes in the past. The new study, published July 23rd by the journal Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (BSSA), provides the most comprehensive fault information for the region to date. Fault slip potential modeling explores two scenarios: a model based on subsurface stress on the faults prior to high-volume wastewater injection and a model of those forces reflecting increase in fluid pressure due to injection. None of the faults shown to have the highest potential for an [...]

By | 2019-07-24T08:21:46-07:00 July 24th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on New map outlines seismic faults across DFW region

Listen: David J. Meltzer, Anthropology, discusses his work on the Meateater podcast

The Meateater Originally Posted: July 23, 2019 Steven Rinella talks to David J. Meltzer and Janis Putelis. Subjects discussed: Understanding radio carbon dates; crossing the Bering Land Bridge; who were the first Americans?; the early human aversion to incest; ecotones, or where a bunch of good shit comes together; glyptodons and 3-ton ground sloths; a big extinction on one fine Tuesday; Rambo; the tidy appeal of the blitzkreig hypothesis; Clovis points; cross examining. Listen

By | 2019-07-23T10:41:12-07:00 July 23rd, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Listen: David J. Meltzer, Anthropology, discusses his work on the Meateater podcast
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