Another award winning book from the Clements Center!

Dedman College News Originally Posted: March 4, 2021 Clements Center fellow Miguel Ángel González-Quiroga was awarded the Ramirez Family Award for Most Significant Scholarly Book from the Texas Institute of Letters for his book War and Peace on the Rio Grande Frontier, 1830-1880 (University of Oklahoma Press).  His book previously won both the Tejano Book Award from the Tejano Genealogy Society and the Coral Horton Tullis Memorial Prize from the Texas State Historical Association. https://www.oupress.com/books/15456265/war-and-peace-on-the-rio-grande-frontier-1830?fbclid=IwAR2MLmbT0kO6B7-2bWhWqF2OovagpyzSjfPM6_EUUEut4vbv9HS9UrDEOak

By | 2021-03-04T11:12:45-08:00 March 4th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Graduate News, History, SW Center|Comments Off on Another award winning book from the Clements Center!

Congratulations to SMU alumnus Aaron Sanchez

Congratulations to Aaron Sanchez (SMU Ph.D. 2013) on the publication of his book _Homeland: Ethnic Mexican Belonging since 1900_ (University of Oklahoma Press, 2021). The Clements Center is proud to have supported Aaron and his research.  https://www.oupress.com/books/16122730/homeland

By | 2021-01-26T08:21:55-08:00 January 26th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News, SW Center|Comments Off on Congratulations to SMU alumnus Aaron Sanchez

Congratulations to SMU alumna Jenny Seman

Congratulations to Jenny Seman (SMU PhD, 2015) on the publication of her book, Borderlands Curanderos: The Worlds of Santa Teresa Urrea and Don Pedrito Jaramillo (University of Texas Press, 2021).  The Clements Center is proud to have supported Jenny and her research. https://utpress.utexas.edu/books/seman-borderlands-curanderos

By | 2021-01-25T09:30:27-08:00 January 25th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News, SW Center|Comments Off on Congratulations to SMU alumna Jenny Seman

Texas’s Most Famous Historian Looks Back at His Own, Legendary Life

Texas Monthly Originally Posted: February 2021 Andrew R. Graybill is a professor of history and the director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University. This article originally appeared in the February 2021 issue of Texas Monthly with the headline “A Historian’s History.”  While working in the archives at the Dolph Briscoe Center for American History at the University of Texas at Austin, the historian Michael Collins came across what he describes, somewhat hyperbolically, as “a buried treasure—pure gold, at least in a figurative sense.” It was the unfinished autobiography of Walter Prescott Webb, perhaps the most famous historian the Lone Star State has ever produced. Webb drafted the manuscript in his mid-fifties while spending the 1942–1943 academic year at the University of [...]

By | 2021-01-20T11:25:54-08:00 January 20th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History, SW Center|Comments Off on Texas’s Most Famous Historian Looks Back at His Own, Legendary Life

Clements fellow wins Shapiro Book Prize

The Huntington Originally Posted: January 14, 2021 The Huntington names Clements fellow Benjamin Francis-Fallon the winner of inaugural Shapiro Book Prize for outstanding first monograph in American history and culture for his book, The Rise of the Latino Vote: A History. Congratulations Ben! For more information, see https://www.huntington.org/news/inaugural-shapiro-book-prize-winner-named

By | 2021-01-14T12:17:14-08:00 January 14th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, SW Center|Comments Off on Clements fellow wins Shapiro Book Prize

Book Talk with Robert Chase, a former Clements Center Research Fellow

LAWCHA Pandemic Book Talk Rob Chase was a Clements Center Research Fellow. This event is a discussion about the book he furthered during his fellowship year. LEARN MORE About the event: LAWCHA’s Pandemic Book Talks feature talks by LAWCHA members whose books launched in the midst of (or just before) the pandemic. Book talks will feature a presentation and discussion. Join us November 19 for Robert Chase, We Are Not Slaves: State Violence, Coerced Labor, and Prisoners Rights in Postwar America (University of North Carolina Press, 2020). At 7pm on November 19 Robert Chase, Associate Professor of History at Stony Brook University, will give a 30-minute talk on Zoom about his new book, We Are Not Slaves: State Violence, Coerced Labor, and Prisoners’ Rights in [...]

By | 2020-11-12T10:50:55-08:00 November 12th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News, SW Center|Comments Off on Book Talk with Robert Chase, a former Clements Center Research Fellow

Meet the Editors: A Conversation with Andy Graybill and Ben Johnson on the David J. Weber Series in New Borderlands History

UNC Press Blog Originally Posted: October 15, 2020 We’re pleased to share a Q&A with Andrew R. Graybill and Benjamin H. Johnson, series editors of our David J. Weber Series in the New Borderlands History. This series explores contested boundaries and the intercultural dynamics surrounding them and includes projects in a wide range of time and space within North America and beyond, including Atlantic and Pacific worlds. Series editors welcome outstanding works that “speak back” to the rich literature that has developed over the last few decades, using the concept of borderlands to examine, analyze, and interpret both the North American borderlands and other areas connected to continental processes of making and crossing borders. We are also pleased to announce two new members of the [...]

By | 2020-10-15T08:56:51-07:00 October 15th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History, SW Center|Comments Off on Meet the Editors: A Conversation with Andy Graybill and Ben Johnson on the David J. Weber Series in New Borderlands History

Weber-Clements Book Prize Winner Announced – Maurice Crandall for These People Have Always Been a Republic

Clements Center Originally Posted: October 15, 2020 The 2019 Weber-Clements Prize for the Best Non-fiction Book on Southwestern America is awarded to Maurice S. Crandall for his volume, These People Have Always Been a Republic: Indigenous Electorates in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands, 1598-1912 (David J. Weber Series in the New Borderlands History, University of North Carolina Press, 2019). READ MORE

By | 2020-10-15T08:54:11-07:00 October 15th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, SW Center|Comments Off on Weber-Clements Book Prize Winner Announced – Maurice Crandall for These People Have Always Been a Republic

Politics Are We Ready to Rehabilitate George W. Bush’s Reputation?

Texas Monthly Originally Published: October 2020 Andrew R. Graybill is a professor of history and the director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University. The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum opened seven years ago and anchors the southeastern corner of campus at Southern Methodist University, where I teach history. In late November 2016, I took a tour of the facility with five college friends who were visiting from the East Coast. The recent presidential election was much on our minds as we wandered through the building, contemplating various artifacts from Bush’s two terms in office. Although we were hardly fans of his presidency, one of my pals—fearful, like everyone in our group, of a Trump administration—got misty-eyed [...]

By | 2020-09-17T10:32:56-07:00 September 18th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, History, SW Center|Comments Off on Politics Are We Ready to Rehabilitate George W. Bush’s Reputation?

Predicting the outcome of the election is a fool’s errand — because of contingency

Washington Post Originally posted: July 6, 2020 We are living through the contingent moment to end all contingent moments. In early March, after a stunning turn of fortune, the presidential race seemed to crystallize. Either President Trump, whose approval ratings have always been low, would triumph due to the advantage of incumbency, a strong economy and an energized and devoted base of followers, or former vice president Joe Biden, who dominated Super Tuesday, would win as a kind of safe option for weary voters. Three months later, the election seems likely to be about the coronavirus pandemic and anti-racist uprisings — two huge events that were not on the political radar at the beginning of the year. But this isn’t as unusual as it seems. [...]

By | 2020-07-13T08:23:15-07:00 July 6th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, SW Center|Comments Off on Predicting the outcome of the election is a fool’s errand — because of contingency
Load More Posts