Clements Fellow Sarah Pearsall’s Book, Polygamy: An Early American History, reviewed in The New York Review of Books.

The New York Review of Books Originally Posted: April 9, 2020 The Mormon leader Brigham Young had more than fifty wives. Many of them lived in adjacent homes, the Beehive House and the Lion House, in Salt Lake City, which Young founded in 1847 as the president of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. Polygamy, which the Mormons publicly announced as a church doctrine in 1852, provoked responses ranging from outrage to amusement among many Americans. Numerous anti-Mormon exposés appeared, with titillating titles like Awful Disclosures of Mormonism and Wife No. 19, or, The Story of a Life in Bondage. Bawdy jokes circulated, like this one from a comic newspaper: “Brigham Young cannot be said to rule with a rod of iron, [...]

By | 2020-04-14T05:58:30-07:00 April 9th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Graduate News, SW Center|Comments Off on Clements Fellow Sarah Pearsall’s Book, Polygamy: An Early American History, reviewed in The New York Review of Books.

Event: March 11, Insurgents’ Rights and Borderlands Rebellions

Date: March 11. 2020 Location: Texana Room, Fondren Library Time:12 noon Contact: raelmore@smu.edu This talk by Clements Center fellow Eric Schlereth will explain why some U.S. citizens in the 1830s believed that they possessed "insurgents’ rights," which gave them the right to expatriation & to pledge their allegiance to the government of their choice. Link for more information: https://www.smu.edu/Dedman/Research/Institutes-and-Centers/SWCenter/Events/Afternoon-Talks/Schlereth  

By | 2020-03-06T10:07:22-08:00 March 6th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, SW Center|Comments Off on Event: March 11, Insurgents’ Rights and Borderlands Rebellions

SMU historian Andrew R. Graybill is a newly elected member of the Texas Institute of Letters

Dallas Weekly Originally Posted: March 5, 2020 SMU historian Andrew R. Graybill and University alumna Regina Taylor, an actress and playwright, are newly elected members of the Texas Institute of Letters, an organization that celebrates Texas literature and recognizes distinguished literary achievement. Graybill and Taylor are among 19 new members to be inducted at the upcoming institute annual meeting, to be held in Georgetown March 27-29. “I was thrilled to be selected, particularly because of the extraordinary achievements of the institute’s other members,” Graybill says. “Texas is often undersold. It’s an exceptionally creative place. And to enter as part of a class that includes musicians Robert Earl Keen and James McMurtry is especially exciting to me.” Graybill, a San Antonio native, is a professor in the [...]

By | 2020-03-09T11:33:46-07:00 March 6th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History, SW Center|Comments Off on SMU historian Andrew R. Graybill is a newly elected member of the Texas Institute of Letters

Cancelled: March 26, Weber-Clements Book Prize Award Talk – “Hopi Runners: Crossing the Terrain Between Indian and American”

Date: March 26, 2020 Location: Texana Room, Fondren Library Time:5:30 reception followed by lecture and book signing Contact: raelmore@smu.edu Weber-Clements Book Prize winner Matthew Sakiestewa Gilbert looks at the venerable tradition of Hopi foot races and long distance running at a time of great consequence for Hopi culture placing long distance runners in a larger context of American sports. Link for more information: https://www.smu.edu/Dedman/Research/Institutes-and-Centers/SWCenter/Book-Prize/Current-Winners

By | 2020-03-24T08:47:18-07:00 March 1st, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, SW Center|Comments Off on Cancelled: March 26, Weber-Clements Book Prize Award Talk – “Hopi Runners: Crossing the Terrain Between Indian and American”

Cancelled: April 7, Monument and Memory in Texas History: From Sacred Site to Martial Symbol

Date: April 7, 2020 Location: Texana Room, Fondren Library Time:5:30 reception followed by lecture Contact: Ruth Ann Elmore Clements Senior Fellow Sam Haynes will examine the gendered dimensions of commemoration and memory, focusing on the ways in organizations & leaders used monuments to create their own distinct interpretations of the state’s heritage. Link for more information: https://www.smu.edu/Dedman/Research/Institutes-and-Centers/SWCenter/Events/Lectures/SrFellowLecture

By | 2020-03-24T08:49:04-07:00 March 1st, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, SW Center|Comments Off on Cancelled: April 7, Monument and Memory in Texas History: From Sacred Site to Martial Symbol

Fox Host Brian Kilmeade’s New Book About the Alamo Isn’t Fair and Balanced

Texas Monthly Originally Posted: December 11, 2019 Andrew R. Graybill is professor of history and director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University. On the eve of the publication of his new book about the Texas Revolution, Brian Kilmeade gave a promotional interview to his Fox News colleague Tucker Carlson. “All they wanted was a shot at success,” he said of the Anglo settlers who in the 1820s and 1830s flocked to what was then northern Mexico. “[T]hey said, ‘I’ll be a part of Mexico as long as you give us freedom and liberty.’” But, as Kilmeade explained to Carlson, when the Mexican government abrogated what the Americans believed were their rights—including unfettered immigration from the United States and [...]

By | 2019-12-12T09:09:49-08:00 December 12th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Fox Host Brian Kilmeade’s New Book About the Alamo Isn’t Fair and Balanced

Does Tony Horwitz’s New Book Get Texas Right?

Texas Monthly Originally Posted: May 2019 Andrew R. Graybill is the chair of the History Department at Southern Methodist University and the author of The Red and the White: A Family Saga of the American West. Several years ago Tony Horwitz was tasked by his wife to “ruthlessly cull” the books he had amassed as a college student during the Carter administration. Sifting through boxes stashed at their house on Martha’s Vineyard, Horwitz came across The Cotton Kingdom, an 1861 book by the New York journalist Frederick Law Olmsted—better known today as the landscape architect who co-designed Manhattan’s Central Park. The book was the culmination of several trips Olmsted had made to the American South, including Texas, in the 1850s. (His account of his rambles [...]

By | 2019-05-14T10:22:30-07:00 May 15th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Does Tony Horwitz’s New Book Get Texas Right?

In Mexico, there’s no place like home: Most don’t want to head north for work anymore

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: March 13, 2019 For generations dating back to the 1930s, throughout Mexico, including in this region in the central state of Guanajuato known as El Bajio, the towns have emptied themselves out of their youths during what's called the 'winter blues.' The young would head north to seek out their own version of the American Dream: Jobs. In North Texas and other places they worked in everything from gardening, to restaurant service, to roofing and to constructing some of the area's most iconic buildings. They helped build D/FW International Airport, Texas Stadium and just about every high-rise in Dallas. No more. "Dallas was the dream of my father - it's not my dream," said Jairo Villalon, 21. With his friends, [...]

By | 2019-03-15T06:37:52-07:00 March 15th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on In Mexico, there’s no place like home: Most don’t want to head north for work anymore

Andrew R. Graybill reviews “Boom Town” by Sam Anderson.

Wall Street Journal Originally Posted: September 20, 2018 Mr. Andrew Graybill is the chair of the history department and co-director of the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University. In 1990, United Airlines was in search of a home for its new repair center. Dazzled by the prospect of 8,000 new jobs and $700 million in revenue, Oklahoma City launched an aggressive campaign to lure the facility. To help fund some of the incentives used to tempt the company, residents agreed to a $120 million tax hike. Boosters took out an ad on a billboard outside United’s Chicago headquarters imploring the airline to “Come Fly the Friendly Skies of Oklahoma City.” But in the end Indianapolis won the day. As Sam [...]

By | 2018-10-02T08:31:07-07:00 October 2nd, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Andrew R. Graybill reviews “Boom Town” by Sam Anderson.
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