Some Personality Traits Are Easier To Change Than Others

Forbes Originally Posted: September 2019 A growing number of studies in psychology are showing that personality is more “changeable” than previously thought. Personality changes as we age; it changes as we learn new things and are exposed to new environments. But which aspects of personality might be easiest to change, and which might be most difficult? New research appearing in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology may hold the answer. A team of researchers led by Nathan Hudson of Southern Methodist University designed an experiment to test which of five core personality traits would change most over the course of a 15-week intervention. Interestingly, they found that the personality trait of “agreeableness” showed the most improvement while the trait “openness to experiences” showed the least improvement. To arrive [...]

By | 2019-10-21T10:06:33-07:00 October 21st, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Some Personality Traits Are Easier To Change Than Others

Jill DeTemple is teaching local students and faculty nationwide how to effectively navigate hot-button topics

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: October 17, 2019 I don’t know about you, but the sorry state of what passes for debate these days — hair-trigger anger and social media carpet-bombing — beats me into believing that thoughtful discussion about life’s toughest stuff is dead and gone. Too often, I wind up feeling timid, tentative or just plain tired-head around hot-button issues. That’s why I went back to college last week to look into what I had heard were powerful efforts by one professor and her students to revive civil discourse. I didn’t find a magic potion for what ails society, but I did come back with better ideas on how to reengage. The timing couldn’t have been better, given the hotbed of political emotions [...]

By | 2019-10-17T08:42:50-07:00 October 17th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Religious Studies|Comments Off on Jill DeTemple is teaching local students and faculty nationwide how to effectively navigate hot-button topics

The (Lack of) Science Behind Time-Outs As a Tool to Discipline Children

Time Originally Posted: October 15, 2019 George Holden, chair of the Department of Psychology at Southern Methodist University was quoted in this article When Amy and Steve Unruh decided to adopt a four-year-old child from the Philippines, they anticipated challenges. They understood it would take time, as well as a great deal of love and care, for their family and its newest member to adjust. But they were committed to helping a child in need. The Unruh’s were blindsided when their adoption application was turned down. The reason, they were told, was that their parenting style was not suitable for an adopted child. “They said it was because we’ve used time-outs with our daughter,” says Amy Unruh, 43, who is a stay-at-home mom in Milton, [...]

By | 2019-10-15T09:27:35-07:00 October 15th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on The (Lack of) Science Behind Time-Outs As a Tool to Discipline Children

Researchers unveil new volcanic eruption forecasting technique

SMU News Originally Posted: September 12, 2019 Volcanic eruptions and their ash clouds pose a significant hazard to population centers and air travel, especially those that show few to no signs of unrest beforehand. Geologists are now using a technique traditionally used in weather and climate forecasting to develop new eruption forecasting models. By testing if the models are able to capture the likelihood of past eruptions, the researchers are making strides in the science of volcanic forecasting. The study, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, examined the eruption history of the Okmok volcano in Alaska. In 2008, a large eruption produced an ash plume that extended approximately 1 mile into the sky over the Aleutian Islands – posing a significant hazard to aircraft engines along [...]

By | 2019-10-07T08:43:49-07:00 October 9th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences|Comments Off on Researchers unveil new volcanic eruption forecasting technique

Why do birds migrate at night?

SMU Research Originally Posted: September 12, 2019 Migratory birds are known to rely on Earth's magnetic field to help them navigate the globe. And it was suspected that a protein called cryptochrome, which is sensitive to blue light, was making it possible for birds to do this. Yet many of these animals are also known to migrate at night when there isn't much light available. So it wasn't clear how cryptochrome would function under these conditions in birds. A new study led by UT Southwestern Medical Center in collaboration with SMU (Southern Methodist University), though, may have figured out the answer to that puzzle. Researchers found that cryptochromes from migratory birds have evolved a mechanism that enhances their ability to respond to light, which can [...]

By | 2019-09-24T11:07:52-07:00 September 26th, 2019|Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Why do birds migrate at night?

How we can use the art of listening to heal the divisions in our country.

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: Septemeber 11, 2019 Jill DeTemple is associate professor of religious studies at Southern Methodist University and a faculty associate at Essential Partners. She wrote this column for The Dallas Morning News. It's not too late to start listening. Giving ear and respect to other perspectives builds trust and a sense of community we have lost and desperately hope to regain. There's an opportunity to do this in classrooms, living rooms and assembly rooms. It starts with setting the stage and ground rules to promote honest and safe dialogue. It continues with free-flowing exchanges after we take a chance and learn why others believe what they believe. "I used to joke that I was a passive anarchist waiting for civilization to [...]

By | 2019-09-18T07:23:58-07:00 September 18th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Religious Studies|Comments Off on How we can use the art of listening to heal the divisions in our country.

Listen: A Better Place In A Warming World

KERA Originally Posted: September 3, 2019 In the discussions about how to mitigate climate change, two important factors are largely ignored: migration and trade. Southern Methodist University professor Klaus Desmet talks to host Krys Boyd about the importance of strategizing long term solutions for commerce and conservation, which he writes about in The Catalyst. LISTEN

By | 2019-09-04T07:49:45-07:00 September 4th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Listen: A Better Place In A Warming World

Sept. 11: NSF-RTG and Department of Mathematics Research Colloquium

  Wednesday, September 11, 2019  Opportunities for student collaborations with UTSW Neuroscience  Julian Meeks, Brad Pfeiffer, and Wei Xu Department of Neuroscience University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Abstract: Starting this year, an NSF RTG (Research Training Grant) will fund the development of three vertically-integrated research training groups, each of which partners SMU mathematicians with scientists in other disciplines. The group Computation-enabled investigations into circuits and cognition will partner SMU mathematicians with experimental neuroscientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center.  There will be opportunities for both grad students and undergrads to collaborate with our partner labs. Today, the principal investigators will introduce their labs. The Meeks Lab studies the neurobiology of olfaction (the sense of smell). We study the encoding, decoding, and physiological impacts of pheromones using [...]

By | 2019-09-04T07:31:35-07:00 September 4th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Events, Mathematics|Comments Off on Sept. 11: NSF-RTG and Department of Mathematics Research Colloquium

A Story About El Paso and Soccer That You Should Read

D Magazine Originally Posted: August 16, 2019 You might recognize the name Roberto José Andrade Franco. He’s a Ph.D. candidate at SMU who has written a few stories for D Magazine. Roberto is from El Paso. He was there when a North Texas man killed 22 people in a Walmart. At the time, Roberto had an assignment from Deadspin to write about soccer in Juarez. There was no way he could write about the sport without addressing the violence. The result was quite something. A taste: I’ve made that drive so many times I’ve lost count. I know where to stop for gas and which bathrooms are clean. As you drive into that open west Texas land, hours pass between glimpses of even moderate-sized cities. [...]

By | 2019-09-04T07:42:10-07:00 September 3rd, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Graduate News, History|Comments Off on A Story About El Paso and Soccer That You Should Read

U.S. and China trade war, and why experts disagree on its impact

Market News Originally Posted: August 7, 2019 The ongoing trade war between the United States and China continues to make an impact on businesses even beyond the two nations’ borders. U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer and Treasury Secretary Steven Mnuchin are currently meeting with Chinese diplomats in Shanghai to find a resolution. Until an agreement is reached though, businesses and consumers will continue to deal with the uncertainty. “I don’t think there’s much optimism, or I’m pretty sure there is no optimism, that this round of talks is going to get very far,” Southern Methodist University Associate Professor of Economics James Lake said. READ MORE

By | 2019-08-07T14:40:22-07:00 August 12th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on U.S. and China trade war, and why experts disagree on its impact
Load More Posts