Maguire Public Service Fellows to help at-risk communities

SMU News Originally Posted: May 28, 2020 DALLAS (SMU) – This summer, ten SMU students will serve as Maguire Public Service Fellows, with much of their work focused on research and programs related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Maguire Center, with financial assistance from the Irby Family Foundation, awards summer fellowships to SMU students who wish to devote time to public service or ethics research. Over the past 20 years, the Maguire Center has awarded summer fellowship stipends totaling over $400,000 to 181 SMU students, including volunteers in more than 150 agencies across 18 states, 25 countries, and five continents. “I’m very proud of this group’s desire to serve others during this unprecedented time. This pandemic is likely to be a defining moment in their lives and their dedication to [...]

By | 2020-05-28T09:16:39-07:00 May 28th, 2020|Anthropology, Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, History, World Languages and Literatures|Comments Off on Maguire Public Service Fellows to help at-risk communities

Gamers join scientific research to help end the COVID-19 threat

Dallas Innovates Originally Posted: May 20, 2020 DALLAS (SMU) - While medical professionals everywhere have been hard at work for months searching for a cure to the COVID-19 virus, an unlikely industry has emerged to join the fight: the video game community, Dallas Innovates’ Alex Edwards reports. A new effort from BALANCED Media|Technology (BALANCED) and Complexity Gaming intends to garner spare computer processing power that could help find treatments for coronavirus. The two Dallas-based organizations are encouraging anyone that works with video games to donate to the citizen science/crowdsourcing initiative called #WeAreHEWMEN, Edwards explains. The BALANCED’s HEWMAN app will use gamers’ processing power to go through more than 200,000 FDA medications and compounds, with help from SMU computational biologist John Wise. Using these 200,000 compounds, between 1.5 to 3 million virtual [...]

By | 2020-05-27T10:30:22-07:00 May 27th, 2020|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Gamers join scientific research to help end the COVID-19 threat

‘Bored’ seismologists find a new hobby: Tracking silence

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: May 21, 2020 If you’ve been noticing more birds chirping and more frogs singing, it’s probably not your imagination. Noise created by humans, such as car and truck traffic, quieted by about 30 percent between late March, when Gov. Greg Abbott closed schools and restaurants across Texas, and early May, according to a new analysis by researchers at Southern Methodist University. “There was quite a big change in some areas,” said Stephen Arrowsmith, a seismologist at SMU, who took on the project with a class of undergraduate and graduate students this spring. READ MORE

By | 2020-05-22T08:55:44-07:00 May 22nd, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on ‘Bored’ seismologists find a new hobby: Tracking silence

How SMU computer science professors are using their resources to help find a coronavirus vaccine

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: April 24, 2020 Frederick R. Chang is a cyber security professor, chair of the Department of Computer Science at Southern Methodist University and the founding director of the SMU AI Lab. Jo Guldi is an associate professor of history at SMU, where she teaches text mining and is a founding member of the SMU AI Lab. They wrote this column for The Dallas Morning News. What if university computer scientists, biologists and historians collaborated to use modern artificial intelligence and machine learning to examine a massive trove of infectious disease research papers, text mining for abstract patterns, elusive insights and hard-to-spot trends related to COVID-19 and the coronavirus family of viruses? Imagine the energy such a group could generate if their students, [...]

By | 2020-04-24T12:39:24-07:00 April 24th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on How SMU computer science professors are using their resources to help find a coronavirus vaccine

Scott-Hawkins Lecture Fund Now Accepting Applications for Fall 2020

DCII Originally Posted: April 15, 2020 The DCII welcomes proposals for support from the Scott-Hawkins lecture fund. The DCII is particularly interested in proposals for speakers that appeal to an interdisciplinary audience. Email dcinterdisciplinaryinstitute@smu.edu for info on applying. Link for more information: https://www.smu.edu/Dedman/Research/Institutes-and-Centers/DCII/Programs/ScottHawkins

By | 2020-04-15T08:08:39-07:00 April 15th, 2020|DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Scott-Hawkins Lecture Fund Now Accepting Applications for Fall 2020

Professor Amy Kohout Awarded Fellowship for Work on Book

Colorado College Originally Posted: March 11, 2020 Assistant Professor of History Amy Kohout has been awarded a David J. Weber Fellowship for the Study of Southwestern America at the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies at Southern Methodist University. This prestigious award will allow her to complete work on her first book, tentatively titled “Taking the Field: Soldiers, Nature, and Empire on American Frontiers.” The book explores the intersection of ideas about nature and empire through an examination of the experiences of American soldiers in the U.S. West and the Philippines in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. READ MORE

By | 2020-03-26T13:41:07-07:00 March 10th, 2020|SW Center|Comments Off on Professor Amy Kohout Awarded Fellowship for Work on Book

Mayer Fellow Proposals Due April 1

The DCII is now soliciting proposals for 2020-21 undergraduate Mayer Fellows. Fellows will have access to $2000 to use for research travel or for other research related expenses. Email dcinterdisciplinaryinstitute@smu.edu for application information. Link for more information: https://www.smu.edu/Dedman/Research/Institutes-and-Centers/DCII/Scholarship/Mayer

By | 2020-03-05T11:36:23-08:00 March 5th, 2020|DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Mayer Fellow Proposals Due April 1

Genetics Magazine Highlights Research from Department of Biological Science

GENETICS MAGAZINE Originally Posted: March 2020 issue Differential Contributions of DNA-Binding Proteins to Polycomb Response Element Activity at theDrosophila giant Gene ABSTRACT Polycomb-group (PcG) proteins are evolutionarily conserved epigenetic regulators whose primary function is to maintain the transcriptional repression of target genes. Recruitment of Drosophila melanogaster PcG proteins to target genes requires the presence of one or more Polycomb Response Elements (PREs). The functions or necessity for more than one PRE at a gene are not clear and individual PREs at some loci may have distinct regulatory roles. Various combinations of sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins are present at a given PRE, but only Pleiohomeotic (Pho) is present at all strong PREs. The giant (gt) locus has two PREs, a proximal PRE1 and a distal PRE2. During [...]

By | 2020-03-05T08:21:38-08:00 March 5th, 2020|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Genetics Magazine Highlights Research from Department of Biological Science

VR is making medical training cheaper, better, and more accessible than ever

Digital Trends Originally Posted: March 1, 2020 Sometimes, location is everything. When Dr. Eric Bing started working at Dallas’ Southern Methodist University (SMU), the person in the office next to his would give him a new perspective on how virtual reality can be instrumental in teaching medical students. SMU happens to have one of the world’s best graduate schools for video game design and Bing’s office neighbor, Professor Anthony Cuevas, helps create the curriculum for it. Surgery and first person shooters may seem worlds apart, but over the course of several months, the professors’ neighborly chitchat gave rise to a low-cost VR training system that can be implemented in locations where medical schools are limited, such as sub-saharan Africa. READ MORE

By | 2020-03-03T08:24:57-08:00 March 3rd, 2020|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on VR is making medical training cheaper, better, and more accessible than ever
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