SMU virologist in NYT

New York Times Originally Posted: August 20, 2020 Drug Pitched to Trump for Covid-19 Comes From a Deadly Plant The chief executive of My Pillow, a Trump donor, claims oleandrin is a miracle cure for Covid-19. But no studies have shown that it is safe or effective, and the shrub it’s derived from is poisonous. An excerpt from the NYT article: So why would anyone think oleandrin could be a treatment for Covid? It’s not uncommon for plants — even poisonous ones — to generate interest as treatments for disease. Robert Harrod, a professor at Southern Methodist University, has studied oleandrin’s potential to fight a type of leukemia, for example. Although Dr. Harrod said that using oleandrin to treat the coronavirus was not yet more [...]

By | 2020-08-21T08:38:33-07:00 August 21st, 2020|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on SMU virologist in NYT

The professor and the dancer: How an unlikely duo is guiding the reopening of two local cultural institutions

The Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: July 31, 2020 Dr. Eric Bing, a global health expert, and Khris Beeson, an SMU graduate in dance, may make an unlikely duo. But together they are helping Dallas Theater and SMU Meadows create plans for safe performances in the face of the coronavirus. READ MORE

By | 2020-07-31T08:49:26-07:00 August 7th, 2020|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences|Comments Off on The professor and the dancer: How an unlikely duo is guiding the reopening of two local cultural institutions

More colleges should be teaching human rights courses today (opinion)

Inside Higher Ed Originally Posted: July 24, 2020 Our society is under simultaneous assaults on political, cultural, economic and social norms. Many people, especially those in different generations, are polarized as we confront an accelerated pace of change against institutionalized racism, bigotry and a systemically flawed criminal justice system that for too long has targeted the marginalized because of their skin color, ethnicity, country of origin or (lower) economic standing. I am 70 years old, and I am energized and excited to witness and support a younger generation demanding its turn at changing this country into what it can and must become in order to move forward. I came of age during a similar era of historic and tumultuous times. I lived through the violence [...]

By | 2020-07-29T07:30:30-07:00 July 28th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Embrey Human Rights Events, Events, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on More colleges should be teaching human rights courses today (opinion)

How the (Econometrics) Sausage is Made: Thoughts from Economics Professor Daniel Millimet

Department of Economics Research Originally Posted: July 16, 2020 Even for experienced empirical researchers, certain econometric issues can be often overlooked or seem confusing. It can seem like everyone else knows what’s going on except you! The rapid pace with which new econometric methods are being developed further exacerbates these issues. Who has the time to keep up to date? Enter, Professor Daniel Millimet from the SMU Department of Economics. His blog, “How the (Econometrics) Sausage is made” lays out what empirical practitioners need to know when it comes to those often overlooked or confusing issues as well as recently developed techniques in a simple, reader friendly way. His research spans microeconometric methods and applications in labor economics, environmental economics, and international trade and he teaches courses [...]

By | 2020-07-16T10:01:01-07:00 July 16th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on How the (Econometrics) Sausage is Made: Thoughts from Economics Professor Daniel Millimet

A local archaeologist wants you to understand how the field really works.

D Magazine Originally Posted: July 2020 Mark D. McCoy is a geospatial archaeologist and professor at SMU. Prior to our first meeting on campus, I had envisioned a dark office crowded with high-tech equipment and stacks of technical manuals. Instead, I walked into a light, airy space with a low-tech chalkboard and an approachable person who carries with him the sensibility of the sea. Raised in Delaware and educated in the States and New Zealand, McCoy focuses his efforts on Oceania. He has worked in the Hawaiian Islands, New Zealand, Pohnpei, and Palau. His new book, Maps for Time Travelers: How Archaeologists Use Technology to Bring Us Closer to the Past, is like the author: accessible. While the book takes on the esoteric subject of how [...]

By | 2020-07-13T06:26:52-07:00 July 13th, 2020|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on A local archaeologist wants you to understand how the field really works.

Predicting the outcome of the election is a fool’s errand — because of contingency

Washington Post Originally posted: July 6, 2020 We are living through the contingent moment to end all contingent moments. In early March, after a stunning turn of fortune, the presidential race seemed to crystallize. Either President Trump, whose approval ratings have always been low, would triumph due to the advantage of incumbency, a strong economy and an energized and devoted base of followers, or former vice president Joe Biden, who dominated Super Tuesday, would win as a kind of safe option for weary voters. Three months later, the election seems likely to be about the coronavirus pandemic and anti-racist uprisings — two huge events that were not on the political radar at the beginning of the year. But this isn’t as unusual as it seems. [...]

By | 2020-07-13T08:23:15-07:00 July 6th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, SW Center|Comments Off on Predicting the outcome of the election is a fool’s errand — because of contingency

When memory and justice fail us

The Hill Originally Post: June 20, 2020 Holly Bowen is an assistant professor in the Department of Psychology at SMU Dallas where she teaches and directs research on topics including memory, emotion, motivation and aging. Think back to the last time you went on a mission to stock up on supplies due to COVID-19. What route did you take around the store? Can you describe the employee who bagged your groceries? What was the make and model of the car parked next to you? It’s likely this memory is difficult to retrieve and the details surrounding it have faded. After all, this was a stressful and uncertain time and your focus might have been elsewhere. It was some time ago and you have probably forgotten. Now, [...]

By | 2020-06-22T06:15:23-07:00 June 22nd, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on When memory and justice fail us

Activism usually linked to urban centers finds a voice in the frustrations of rapidly changing communities.

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: June 8, 2020 For the seventh day in a row, dozens of sign-waving suburbanites dotted a busy corner in Flower Mound last week, demanding racial equality and decrying police brutality on what seemed unlikely soil as passing motorists honked in support. In this 80% white, Denton County city of 80,000, they’d united in response to the very public death of George Floyd, who died May 25 in the custody of Minneapolis police, an incident that has spawned significant national unrest. “George Floyd’s life was extinguished on camera for the world to see,” said Laura Haines, a white resident who has been among those gathered daily at Long Prairie and Cross Timbers roads. “We’re all seeing what black people have been [...]

By | 2020-06-17T09:59:00-07:00 June 12th, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Sociology, Sociology (Faculty)|Comments Off on Activism usually linked to urban centers finds a voice in the frustrations of rapidly changing communities.

Maguire Public Service Fellows to help at-risk communities

SMU News Originally Posted: May 28, 2020 DALLAS (SMU) – This summer, ten SMU students will serve as Maguire Public Service Fellows, with much of their work focused on research and programs related to the COVID-19 pandemic. The Maguire Center, with financial assistance from the Irby Family Foundation, awards summer fellowships to SMU students who wish to devote time to public service or ethics research. Over the past 20 years, the Maguire Center has awarded summer fellowship stipends totaling over $400,000 to 181 SMU students, including volunteers in more than 150 agencies across 18 states, 25 countries, and five continents. “I’m very proud of this group’s desire to serve others during this unprecedented time. This pandemic is likely to be a defining moment in their lives and their dedication to [...]

By | 2020-05-28T09:16:39-07:00 May 28th, 2020|Anthropology, Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, History, World Languages and Literatures|Comments Off on Maguire Public Service Fellows to help at-risk communities

Gamers join scientific research to help end the COVID-19 threat

Dallas Innovates Originally Posted: May 20, 2020 DALLAS (SMU) - While medical professionals everywhere have been hard at work for months searching for a cure to the COVID-19 virus, an unlikely industry has emerged to join the fight: the video game community, Dallas Innovates’ Alex Edwards reports. A new effort from BALANCED Media|Technology (BALANCED) and Complexity Gaming intends to garner spare computer processing power that could help find treatments for coronavirus. The two Dallas-based organizations are encouraging anyone that works with video games to donate to the citizen science/crowdsourcing initiative called #WeAreHEWMEN, Edwards explains. The BALANCED’s HEWMAN app will use gamers’ processing power to go through more than 200,000 FDA medications and compounds, with help from SMU computational biologist John Wise. Using these 200,000 compounds, between 1.5 to 3 million virtual [...]

By | 2020-05-27T10:30:22-07:00 May 27th, 2020|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Gamers join scientific research to help end the COVID-19 threat
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