INDUSTRY CONNECTIONS: Students Rank Super Bowl Ads

By Kaleb Mulugeta

This Tuesday prospective and current advertising students gathered to rank and review Super Bowl LIV ads. Think of it as a Super Bowl party, two days after the Super Bowl, with no actual Super Bowl. Just commercials. An advertising student’s dream come true.

“The annual Super Bowl Ad Off is the perfect forum for both ad majors and non-ad students to discuss the most talked-about commercials of the year. One of the most important steps that someone interested in advertising can take is to expose themselves to as much work as possible. Not only that but developing a taste for what is good vs great vs what misses the mark is essential when entering this competitive field. Ad Club’s meetings provide the perfect place to discuss, learn and grow” explains Ad Club President Allie Hartman. Students gave their two cents on whether the ads were appropriate for the respective brands, how effective they were, and collectively raised an eyebrow at #BabyNut.

A poll at the end of the night crowned these spots as the best of the bunch:

  1. GoogleLoretta 
  2. AlexaBefore Alexa
  3. JeepGroundhog Day

The most disliked ad of the game goes to OlayMake Space for Women. It began as a strong empowering statement for women but they threw away everything in the last 3 seconds by using the “a woman makes a silly mistake” stereotype when an unknown button is pressed which ejects the astronauts from the space shuttle. They almost had it, too bad.

 Learn more about Ad Club and join here.

AD CLUB: Super Bowl 2019: Our 5 Favorite Ads

The Super Bowl is advertising’s biggest event of the year. As Sunday’s game became the lowest-scoring championship game in football history, the intermittent ads demonstrated an even more memorable competition. Check out our five favorite commercials below!

1. Bumble: “Serena Williams”

We are proud of Temerlin Alumna Chelsea Cain Maclin and her work as Director of Marketing at Bumble. This commercial empowers women through the words of the world’s strongest female athlete: Serena Williams.

Created By: FlyteVu & VMLY&R

 

2. Burger King: “#EatLikeAndy”

Clipped from Jørgen Leth’s 1982 art film 66 Scenes from America, Burger King’s #EatLikeAndy commercial is one minute of voyeuristic footage featuring Andy Warhol eating a Whopper. It was only a matter of time before this video became commercially repurposed.

Created By: David Miami

 

3. Doritos: “Chance the Rapper x Backstreet Boys”

When you combine Chance the Rapper and Backstreet Boys, you get a really expensive Super Bowl ad. More importantly, you get the catchiest jingle of the year.

Created By: Goodby Silverstein & Partners

 

4. Pepsi: “More than OK”

Is a Pepsi OK? Ohh-kay? Okurr? Yes.

Created By: Goodby Silverstein & Partners

 

5. Google: “100 Billion Words”

The first two Super Bowl commercials advertised Google Translate as a great cultural unifier. This soft and emotional portrayal of the company promotes the human benefits of its services.

Created By: Google Creative Labs

An Evaluation of 2017 Super Bowl Advertising

Whether a football fan or not, advertising professionals and students love to watch the Super Bowl, critiquing each advertisement that comes across the screen. Every year there are majority favorites that are usually run by the same few brands; however, this year there were a few changes to the lineup. Easy to say Super Bowl LI was one for the books!

Each year SMU’s Ad Club hosts a Super Bowl Ad Critique following the game. Members of Ad Club get together to discuss their favorite and least favorite advertisements from the Super Bowl and why. This year’s event was Tuesday, February 7, and a few Ad Club members shared their thoughts about the big changes in 2017.

One of the most surprising differences was that the fan favorite from past years, Doritos, did not participate in this year’s Super Bowl.

“I thought it was interesting [that Doritos did not participate] considering they usually participate through their commercial competition,” TAI student Eric Sedeno said. “I think it was a bad move on their part to not put any ads at all because their ads are ones that get more publicity than most.”

Although Heinz’s “Weiner Stampede” was highly loved last year, they did not run an ad during the Super Bowl. Instead, they have a campaign centered around the game in which they are attempting to make the Monday after the Super Bowl a national holiday. There is even a Change.org petition started by Heinz. While this may seem like a joke to many, Heinz is serious in its commitment to making the Monday after the Super Bowl a national holiday.

Ad Club members at the Ad Club Super Bowl Party.

“I think it was a genius move,” TAI student Alex Gurasich said. “Instead of just having another ad, they are actually trying to make a difference with the dollars they would’ve otherwise spent on a Super Bowl ad. I think it was a great marketing tactic, even if it will probably never work.”

Wendy’s released its first Super Bowl ad in 50 years. Mr. Clean also ran its first ever Super Bowl spot this year, with an interesting theme no doubt.

“I enjoyed the [Mr. Clean] spot very much,” Sedeno said. “It was clever, it hit their target market insanely well, and although it made some people very uncomfortable it got stuck in everyone’s head.”

This year boutique hair care brand It’s A 10 ran their first Super Bowl ad as well – the first ad ever run by a privately owned professional hair care company during the game.

“While this commercial was obviously referencing the president, I believe this one is in good fun,” Gurasich said. “Compared to the other politically fueled ads, this one is pretty tame and I think it works in its favor. I enjoyed the diversity of hairstyles; that was a good introduction to the ‘10’ brand.”

As everyone knows, a popular theme among advertisers was equality and diversity. Although many of the ads were in production before President Trump’s executive order concerning travel and immigration, it is clear that this is a topic that runs deep in America.

“I think that messages filled with love and acceptance were something that America needed to hear this year,” TAI student Jolie Guz said. “I am glad that advertisers could take the stage during commercial breaks and stand up for those whose voices may not be heard.”

Congratulations TAI Ad Club 2014-2015 Officers!

Brice Campbell
Faculty Advisor, Brice Campbell

The Temerlin Advertising Institute is excited to announce the 2014-2015 Ad Club Officers! They will be shadowing the current officers spring 2014 and taking over next semester. Under the direction of TAI’s Executive-in-Residence Professor Brice Campbell, they have many great ideas and are sure to make an awesome team!

Ad Club is great for learning more about the advertising industry and networking as well as socializing. Ad Club also organizes agency tours so that students can get a better feel of local agencies and what they are all about. Agency visits typically occur on one Friday during each month. Every February locals in the advertising field come and discuss the Super Bowl ads.

Congratulations officers, TAI wishes you the best of luck!

TAI Ad Club 2014-2015 Officers

President: Genevieve Edgell

Vice President: Connor Finley

Membership: Andrew Fennessy

Communications: Liz Meyer

Treasurer: Kelly Robinson