Dedman College Dean Thomas DiPiero welcomes Dedman College Parents

Date: September 23, 2016
Time: 1-2pm
Location: Dallas Hall lawn

Dedman College Dean Thomas DiPiero welcomes Dedman College parents to on the front lawn of Dallas Hall Friday, September 23, from 1-2 p.m. Come meet the Dean, learn more about your student’s college and find out why we are cooking up some of the best courses on campus! There will be Frog legs (and chicken bites) as we prepare for the SMU vs. TCU game. READ MORE

Latest class of Dedman College Scholars shadowed doctors, founded charities before coming to SMU

SMU News

Originally Posted: September 21, 2016

September 21, 2016

DALLAS (SMU) – Many SMU students come to the Hilltop for their education because they want to change the world.

Some come because they already have.

The latest class of 19 Dedman Scholars, who share a passion for academic excellence and extra-curricular achievement, includes a student who researched genetics and shadowed a breast cancer doctor, another who earned more than $1 million in scholarship offers from universities across the country, and one who founded a charitythat raised $20,000 to build an elementary school in the Dominican Republican.

All of these achievements were accomplished by the scholars before any of them graduated from high school.

“Dedman Scholars provide Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences with strong intellectual leadership,” says Dean Thomas DiPiero. “These students are always out in front doing independent research and spearheading university and civic projects.”

“They receive up to $10,000 in scholarship money annually, they get to participate in a community of scholars that we nurture, and then we guide them through their four years on campus,” says Dedman College Scholars Director David Doyle. “The goal of all the scholars is by the end of their time here, they’re engaged in some kind of independent (research) work. So we kind of lead them along the way.”

This year’s incoming Dedman College Scholars are: Roxana Farokhnia, of McKinney; Madeline Hamilton; of Denton;Jordan Hardin, of Euless; Hideo Ishii-Adajar, of Plano; Kayla Johansen, of Midlothian; Caroline Kelm, Lindale;Hunter Kolon, of Spring; Ashley Mai, of Richardson; Mary Christine (Mimi) Mallory, of Lynn Haven, Florida;Alexandra (Allie) Massman, of Frisco; Hannah Massman, of Frisco; Alexander McNamara, of Mansfield; Lorien Melnick, of Mundelein, Illinois; Andrea D. Nguyen, of Allen; Tannah Oppliger, of Carrollton; Thomas W. Park, of Forth Worth; Aarthi Parvethaneni, of Bellevue, Washington; Anika Reddy, of Dallas; and Cambley Sassman, of Mansfield.

“The 2020 class of Dedman Scholars is the largest in the history of the program and I’m thrilled to have them on campus this fall,” DiPiero adds. “Dedman College will provide these students with the resources and support they need to achieve their lofty dreams, and I look forward to seeing what ambitions they set their sights on during their four years at SMU.”

The Dedman College Scholarship is a donor-supported program, and those interested in supporting it may contact Mary Lynn Amoyo at 214-768-9202 or mamoyo@smu.edu.

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The Dedman College Scholars Program is designed to enrich the University’s intellectual life by providing unique learning opportunities for selected academically strong students seeking a major in Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences. The program offers a merit-based scholarship award, an actively engaged community of peers and close faculty guidance and mentoring.

SMU is a nationally ranked private university in Dallas founded 100 years ago. Today, SMU enrolls approximately 11,000 students who benefit from the academic opportunities and international reach of seven degree-granting schools.

Jo Guldi, History, Between Experts and Citizens

Boston Review

Originally Posted: September 20, 2016

It is safe to say that the Brexit vote—only the third nation-wide referendum in the history of the United Kingdom—disrupted ordinary political norms and expectations. There was the surprise of the vote itself, and David Cameron’s quick abdication; the baffling disappearance of Boris Johnson, followed by his appointment in Theresa May’s new government; and then the failed coup in the Labour Party, leaving Jeremy Corbyn at the helm. Britain’s systems of representational democracy have traditionally functioned to block popular disruptions of this kind. What historical forces are behind Brexit’s spectacular exception to this rule?

One answer begins in the second half of the twentieth century. Several commentators have read the vote as the result of a 1970s turn toward neoliberalism that left the working class behind in a program of coal pit closures and denationalization. Historian Harold James has underscored that the European Monetary System (EMS) grew out of proposals for an international money market that promised escape from national cycles of monetary expansion and inflation. From 1977 onward, the EMS made cheap credit, backed by European nations, available to private banks. In James’s account, this stability-focused monetary policy created a twenty-first century economy that was unaccountable to the working class, diminishing national and local control.

The identity of the European Union is wrapped up in hopes for peace after decades of war. But the neoliberalization narrative also sees in the EU a symbol of the rise of rule by financial experts and the discounting of class-based, representational politics. The financial management once beholden to local and national politics was placed in the hands of an international body, and national governments lost control—or simply divested themselves—of the levers they once had claimed for raising wages. Among the casualties of this transformation were the nationalized industries disassembled under Margaret Thatcher, which had leveraged the power of the state in bargaining between workers and employers. In short order, CEO pay ratcheted up and wages stagnated, and a landscape of ruins was left behind. In place of factories and state housing there were fewer jobs but a growing number of prisons and detention centers for illegal immigrants.

This account of Brexit, drawing on the framework of class-consciousness, turns on the rise of a reactionary electorate outside of London. The idea, in short, is that the United Kingdom has witnessed the lumpenproletariat exact uncertain revenge upon the nation’s ruling elite. This narrative more or less parallels Marx’s account of the December 1851 coup in France in The Eighteenth Brumaire of Louis Napoleon. Marx blamed the rise of the dictatorship on the greed and disappointment of the petite bourgeoisie, who revolted against the Second Republic and the interest of the workers. This betrayal, Marx argued, precipitated an era of rule by political moron, encapsulated in the premiership of Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte (figured as a template for Boris Johnson by some and for Jeremy Corbyn by others), whom Marx memorably dubbed a “grotesque mediocrity.” Leaders such as these, several commentators have implied, are a parody of the great leadership demanded by the moment. READ MORE

Cal Jillson, Political Science, Campus carry in Texas: At what cost?

The Star Telegram

Originally Posted: September 18, 2016

The predictions last year were ominous.

Allowing concealed handguns on Texas college campuses could create conflict and cost around $50 million over the next few years.

But now, more than a month since campus carry became law, the only real cost — just a fraction of the original projections — has been to put up signs on college campuses statewide letting people know where licensed Texans may not carry concealed guns.

“This has been much ado about nothing,” said state Rep. Allen Fletcher, R-Tomball, who authored campus carry. “When I laid the bill out, one of my arguments was that there’s no justification that this could cost that much money.”

Officials say there haven’t been any problems with campus carry, which went into effect Aug. 1, although there was one incident recently where a gun accidentally discharged in a Tarleton State University dorm. There were no injuries.

As for the overall cost, statewide totals aren’t available.

But a Star-Telegram survey of colleges in Tarrant County shows that officials spent less than $20,000 putting the new law in place locally.

“With campus carry costs, it was a policy debate,” said Cal Jillson, a political science professor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas. “Each side gave the furthest edge number that would support their position.

“Those who had reservations about campus carry in general estimated high on the cost,” he said. “It was an attempt to get the Legislature to think seriously about this and back off or give campuses more flexibility.” READ MORE

Looking back and moving ahead with SMU’s Willard Spiegelman

Dallas Morning News

Originally Posted: September 16, 2016

Every day he taught a class at Southern Methodist University, Willard Spiegelman wore a bow tie and a jacket. Every day in every class he taught, students were expect to write. For 45 years, it was this way.

On a Friday afternoon in early September, Spiegelman wears just khakis and a button down shirt, sleeves rolled to his elbows. He’s spent the past few months packing up his office, giving away volumes of poetry to students and colleagues from his bookshelves, preparing for his move to Manhattan, where he will spend his retirement. For decades he’s split his time between Dallas and the East Coast, where his partner of many years resides.

But before he goes, he’s making appearances to celebrate a new collection of essays, Senior Moments (Farrar, Straus and Giroux, $24), which reflects on the life that made him an icon on campus and respected nationally for his wit and insight.

A native of Philadelphia, Spiegelman arrived in Dallas via undergraduate studies at Williams College and doctorate work at Harvard University. He says his original selling point to academia was as an English Romanticist who built much of his career on poets like Keats and Shelley. Poetry, which became his vocation, was his second love. In childhood, he says, he “took to books.”

Spiegelman grew up in a suburban Jewish household without a lot of books. Education and learning, while valued, were not necessarily tied to the liberal arts. His father grew up in the Depression and studied to become a physician. His mother stocked the house with   Reader’s Digest Condensed Books , but as Spiegelman writes in the first essay from Senior Moments, the house was a place of raucous conversation, not silent reflection. READ MORE

SMU to honor global & local humanitarians at ‘Triumph of the Spirit’ celebration Nov. 16

SMU NEWS

Originally Posted: September 16, 2016

DALLAS (SMU) – African physician Georges Bwelle, who goes the distance to offer free healthcare for his country’s impoverished,and Carol Brady Houston, a compassionate Plano-based supporter of special-needs children and their families, will be recognized with 2016 Triumph of the Spirit Awards at a music- and art-filled celebration Nov. 16 at the Kessler Theater in Dallas.

Sponsored by SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program (EHRP), the bi-annual awards reward both an international and local humanitarian with a total of $30,000. The awards and its related festivities are supported by an anonymous donor.

The dynamic “VOICES”-themed event will feature music by former Sudanese child soldier/current hip-hop peace activist, Emmanuel Jal; the smart, gritty country-folk music of Austin-based BettySoo; compelling spoken-word and live-action performances by Journeyman Ink;and mixed-media works created by SMU students and local professionals.

Event tickets, which support human rights programming, start at $50 (via prekindle.com/triumph) for access to a 6 p.m. reception, 7 to 9 p.m. event, catered hors d’oeuvres, cash bar and valet parking. (For information related to discounts for students and others, contact Sherry Aikman at saikman@smu.edu or 214-768-8347.)

“These awards –which put a human face on the struggle for human rights – are unique to SMU and are rarely offered by higher-education institutions. We’re fortunate we’re able to help extraordinary individuals empower marginalized people in innovative ways,” says EHRP Director Rick Halperin. “The event is also designed to revitalize the spirit of the entire Dallas community as we work to build a kinder and more humanitarian city.” READ MORE

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Dedman College alumnus and Jaguars Tackle, Kelvin Beachum is featured in a new NFL video airing for Hispanic Heritage Month

NFL

Originally Posted: September 16, 2016

Dedman College alumnus and Jaguars Tackle, Kelvin Beachum is featured in a new NFL video airing for Hispanic Heritage Month. Kelvin is doing some excellent work on and off the field. WATCH

http://www.nfl.com/videos/hispanic-heritage-month/0ap3000000702735/Hispanic-Heritage-Month-Kelvin-Beachum

Fondren library closed Saturday, September 17th

Fondren Library will be closed this Saturday, September 17th for Game Day. Regular hours will resume Sunday September 18th at Noon. READ MORE 

Skip Hollandsworth talks about new book during lunchtime lecture series

Daily Campus

Originally Posted: September 13, 2016

Skip Hollandsworth, Texas Monthly journalist and author of “The Midnight Assassin: Panic, Scandal, and the Hunt for America’s First Serial Killer”, kicked off the six-part, lunchtime lecture series, hosted by the Clements Center for Southwest Studies on Wednesday. Beginning at 1:00 p.m. in Hyer Hall, students, faculty, and guests were invited to attend the presentation followed by a short question and answer session and book signing.

Presenting to a room of approximately 50 attendees, Hollandsworth walked the audience through a timeline of events highlighted in his book that surrounded a mysterious string of gruesome murders that occurred in Austin, TX in 1885.

Through use of vivid language and photographs, Hollandsworth painted a picture of what Austin, TX looked like during the 1800s as technological advances began to emerge.

“Austin was transforming from a sepia-toned old west town into a new age. The phrase ‘everything is bigger in Texas’ existed even at that time,” Hollandsworth said as the crowd chuckled.

The lecture attracted people of all ages as Hollandsworth warmed the room with his passion for crime and unsolved mysteries.

Tommie Ethington, who attended the lecture after reading Hollandsworth’s book said, “I was fascinated by learning about the history of Austin. You learn so much about the city in addition to the murders.”

The Center for Southwest Studies puts on public programming each year, beginning with the lunchtime series, in an effort to promote their own research fellows and to engage a broad public interest.

“I have worked with Skip on a couple of events in the past and I thought his book would be a great way to begin the year,” said Andrew Graybill, co-director of Clements Center for Southwest Studies. READ MORE