Medical Device Startup Founded by Dedman College Alumni Secures Investment

While studying at SMU, alumni Edward Allegra, Miguel Quimbar and Jack Reynolds discovered innovative research that could revolutionize the way asthma is treated. This discovery led to the conception of BioLum Sciences. Edward Allegra, a Dedman College alumnus who majored in Economics with a minor in Anthropology, serves as CEO of BioLum. Jack Reynolds, another Dedman College alumnus who double majored in Markets and Culture and Finance, serves as CFO/COO. Miguel Quimbar, who received a minor in Chemistry from Dedman College as well as a major in Accounting, serves as CTO. The three drew from their diverse academic backgrounds and combined their varied skill sets to found the medical device startup in Dallas. BioLum based in Dallas has recently closed a lead investment from Intelis [...]

By | 2017-09-11T07:52:37+00:00 September 11th, 2017|Anthropology, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Sociology, Sociology (Alumni)|Comments Off on Medical Device Startup Founded by Dedman College Alumni Secures Investment

SMU Student Senate is raising funds for disaster relief through their Help for Houston campaign

In support of all who have been affected by Hurricane Harvey, the SMU Student Senate is raising funds for disaster relief through their Help for Houston campaign. The campaign will be accepting donations through this Saturday. Please consider donating:  https://giving.smu.edu/disaster-relief/?utm_campaign=%2Fhelpforhouston

By | 2017-08-30T14:10:16+00:00 August 30th, 2017|Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Earth Sciences, Economics, English, Events, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology, Sociology (Student), Statistical Science, World Languages and Literatures|Comments Off on SMU Student Senate is raising funds for disaster relief through their Help for Houston campaign

Why the Famous Folsom Point Isn’t a Smoking Gun

Sapiens Originally Posted: August 29, 2017   Remember the iconic Folsom point? The one that I said, in my last post, changed the future of archaeology? To recap: On August 29, 1927, paleontologists from the Colorado Museum of Natural History (renamed the Denver Museum of Nature & Science in 2000) discovered a stone projectile point embedded in the ribs of an extinct form of bison. After making that discovery in the field, the researchers left the point sitting where it was and immediately sent out a call to their colleagues to come to northeastern New Mexico to see it for themselves. Within two weeks a number of well-known scientists had visited the site, seen the point in position, and established a scientific consensus: Native Americans lived [...]

By | 2017-08-29T10:37:44+00:00 August 29th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Why the Famous Folsom Point Isn’t a Smoking Gun

Watch: The 2017-18 School Year Starts at SMU

SMU News Originally Posted: August 27, 2017 Welcome to a new year on the Hilltop. Watch remarks by SMU officials, various events, move-in day and behind-the-scenes preparations  for school's start. Watch  

This Lab Replicates Weapons to Reveal Stone Age Feats of Engineering

Smithsonian Magazine Originally Posted: August 23, 2017 The so-called Clovis people, one of the earliest communities to inhabit North America, left behind more than 10,000 arrowheads scattered throughout the continent. Depending on their location, the crafted blades have slightly differing designs, but archaeologists still aren't sure why these differences evolved. Over the last year, however, Kent State University archaeologist Metin Eren has turned his lab into a modern-day weapons workshop to find out. Recently, Eren's experiments helped solve a long simmering mystery about grooves carved in some Clovis points, reports Dake Kang for the Associated Press. Outwardly, the grooves in the blades appear to serve no functional purpose, leading archaeologists in the past to speculate they were decorative or served some religious purpose, reports Kang. However, by using replicated arrowheads, a mechanical crusher and computer simulations, Eren revealed [...]

By | 2017-08-29T08:04:30+00:00 August 23rd, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on This Lab Replicates Weapons to Reveal Stone Age Feats of Engineering

Medical anthropologists like SMU’s Carolyn Smith-Morris are helping the biomedical community untangle the social roots of diabetes

Sapiens Originally Posted: August 22, 2017 Mary (a pseudonym) was 18 years old and halfway through her second pregnancy when anthropologist Carolyn Smith-Morris met her 10 years ago. Mary, a Pima Indian, was living with her boyfriend, brother, parents, and 9-month-old baby in southern Arizona. She had been diagnosed with gestational diabetes during both of her pregnancies, but she didn’t consider herself diabetic because her diabetes had gone away after her first birth. Perhaps her diagnosis was even a mistake, she felt. Mary often missed her prenatal appointments, because she didn’t have a ride to the hospital from her remote home on the reservation. She considered diabetes testing a “personal thing,” so she didn’t discuss it with her family. As Smith-Morris’ research revealed, Mary’s story [...]

By | 2017-08-23T04:57:28+00:00 August 23rd, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Medical anthropologists like SMU’s Carolyn Smith-Morris are helping the biomedical community untangle the social roots of diabetes

Watch: Welcome Back to the Hilltop!

SMU News Originally Posted: August 14, 2017 https://youtu.be/OdXg_K1Yk00 SMU’s faculty and staff prepared all summer for our students’ return to the Hilltop. Now we only have one week until we kick off the fall semester! From fostering innovation in the classroom to building spirit in the commons, the students bring campus to life. We look forward to seeing you back again soon. Dr. K.C. Mmeje, Vice President for Student Affairs  

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