Virtual Reality Brings Cervical Cancer Surgery Training to Physicians

Watch "Surgeons in developing countries can more easily get training on the procedure, potentially saving women’s lives," said Dr. Eric G. Bing, who co-authored a study on the simulation and is a global health professor at Southern Methodist University (SMU). Watch SMU’s Lifesaving VR video to learn more.  

By | 2019-06-10T09:21:32-07:00 June 10th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Virtual Reality Brings Cervical Cancer Surgery Training to Physicians

DNA From 31,000-Year-Old Human Teeth Reveals New Ethnic Group Living in Siberia During Last Ice Age

SMU Research Originally Posted: June 6, 2019 An international team of researchers, including SMU anthropologist David J. Meltzer, discovered a new group of ancient Siberians. The research was published June 5, 2019 as a story in Nature Two children’s milk teeth buried deep in a remote archaeological site in north eastern Siberia have revealed a previously unknown group of people lived there during the last Ice Age. The finding was part of a wider study, which also discovered 10,000 year-old human remains in another site in Siberia are genetically related to Native Americans – the first time such close genetic links have been discovered outside of the US. The international team of scientists, led by Professor Eske Willerslev who holds positions at St John’s College, University [...]

By | 2019-06-06T08:45:55-07:00 June 6th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on DNA From 31,000-Year-Old Human Teeth Reveals New Ethnic Group Living in Siberia During Last Ice Age

Congrats, Class of 2019!

SMU News Originally Posted: May 16, 2019 These are quotes from a SMU News article in May 2019. To read the full article: CLICK HERE “What sets SMU apart from other schools is the ability to pursue multiple majors and experience a strong academic program while exploring various interests. Fusing my majors cultivated my creativity and ingenuity.” MEREDITH BURKE ’19, ’20, triple major in mechanical engineering, art and math, secured a full-time position at Raytheon as a software engineer and will work on her master’s in mechanical engineering at SMU. “At SMU, I was able to forge my own path. Thanks to the human rights program, I’ve also made lasting connections that have enabled me to expand the scope of work I’ve been doing. I’ve been [...]

By | 2019-05-23T06:42:36-07:00 May 20th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Events, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Congrats, Class of 2019!

Congratulations to all the Hilltop Excellence Awards Winners

Dedman College News Originally Posted: April 18, 2019 On Monday, April 15, SMU celebrated students and faculty that have made significant contributions to the University at the Hilltop Excellence Awards. Congratulations to all the award winners! Below is a list of winners, * are Dedman College faculty and students.   The Dr. James E. Caswell Award : Rani Vestal. Emmie V. Baine Legacy Award : *Andrea Salt. A. Kenneth Pye Outstanding Greek Leader Award : *Jackson Hughes, N'dea Fleming, *Melissa Kraft, and *Ashley Mai. The Extra Mile Award : Ira Greenberg, *Ross Sloan, and Megan Murphy. The Sheri Mooney Memorial Recognition : Eliana Yellin, *Smythe Mullikin, and Tejumola Longe. The Outstanding Faculty/Staff Volunteer Award : Kathy Hubbard of the Hart Center for Engineering Leadership. Outstanding Senior Woman [...]

By | 2019-04-18T06:52:04-07:00 April 18th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Embrey Human Rights Events, Events, Sociology, Sociology (Faculty)|Comments Off on Congratulations to all the Hilltop Excellence Awards Winners

SMU wants to bring North Texas’ historic artifacts back home

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: March 18, 2019 Unearthing artifacts that lead to a better understanding of our past is not just an Indiana Jonesexercise in exotic foreign lands. It is a research endeavor that begins decades later in the basements and attics of some of our most distinguished institutions of higher learning. North Texas is rich with archaeological treasures currently moldering in repurposed wooden crates and file boxes. When discovered, categorized and properly cataloged, they reveal important insights about the history of our region. But, like the treasures in many archaeological collection facilities across the United States, the artifacts and records require ongoing, curatorial care to bring their untapped research potential to light. With the exception of sage members of the Texas archaeology community, few [...]

By | 2019-03-20T09:02:41-07:00 March 19th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on SMU wants to bring North Texas’ historic artifacts back home

Flooding of Archaeological Sites in Hurricane Harvey Used to Prepare for Future Impacts of Megastorms

Cambridge University Press Originally Posted: March 6, 2019 Southern Methodist University archaeologists used satellite imagery to map impacts of Hurricane Harvey to 920 archaeological sites. Leslie A. Reeder-Myers, an SMU alum currently at Temple University, and Mark D. McCoy of the Department of Anthropology published new research in the journal American Antiquity detailing how 40% of all known archaeological sites were flooded as a consequence of Harvey. The study will help plan for how best to preserve heritage in the near future. Link for more information: https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/american-antiquity/article/preparing-for-the-future-impacts-of-megastorms-on-archaeological-sites-an-evaluation-of-flooding-from-hurricane-harvey-houston-texas/A071425AD1C69A33E763A61378C87260

By | 2019-03-06T10:54:40-07:00 March 6th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Flooding of Archaeological Sites in Hurricane Harvey Used to Prepare for Future Impacts of Megastorms

Today, March 5: SMU Giving Day

One day. For 24 hours on March 5, the entire SMU community will come together to give back and celebrate the causes we care about – supporting students, improving cities, educating teachers, fighting for justice, fueling champions – together, the possibilities are endless. Please consider supporting a Dedman College cause: Dedman College Scholars Dean’s Research Council SMU Human Rights SMU Fund for Dedman College Data Hackathon Challenges: Dean’s Research Council Match Gifts made to the Dedman College Dean’s Research Council will be matched dollar-for-dollar up to $10,000. Thank you to generous donors, Dr. Anthony Aramoonie ‘94 and Nicole Aramoonie for making this possible! Dedman College Scholars Challenge Support scholarships and help us meet the challenge from longtime SMU supporters Carl Sewell ’66 and Peggy Higgins [...]

Christopher Roos, Anthropology, Jemez Pueblo offers centuries of valuable fire lessons

Albuquerque Journal Originally Posted: December 22, 2018 BY: CHRISTOPHER ROOS / ENVIRONMENTAL ARCHAEOLOGIST, ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR OF ANTHROPOLOGY AT SMU DALLAS The wildland fire tragedy in California underscores the risk of living on a flammable planet. In 2017, co-occurring outbreaks cost dozens of lives in both California and Portugal. Australia also endures waves of deadly fire. Even places we do not typically associate with wildfire appear among the rolls of devastated communities. We have global wildfire problems that are varied, urgent and deadly. As an environmental archaeologist, I know that these flammable landscapes have long human histories, too. I look to this history for examples of successful coexistence between human societies and fire. I have been working with the Native American community at Jemez Pueblo, whose ancestors [...]

By | 2019-01-14T10:43:45-07:00 January 15th, 2019|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Christopher Roos, Anthropology, Jemez Pueblo offers centuries of valuable fire lessons

David Meltzer, Anthropology, ancient DNA reveals complex migrations of first Americans

National Geographic Originally Posted: November 8, 2018   Ancient DNA reveals complex migrations of the first Americans Newly sequenced Native genomes showcase a wealth of surprises, from previously unknown populations to unique high-altitude adaptations. “Where do I come from?” That's perhaps one of the most fundamental questions for humanity. Now, three studies of ancient and modern human DNA are offering some intriguing answers by providing a detailed new look at the complex peopling of the Americas. Once modern humans left Africa about 60,000 years ago, they swiftly expanded across six continents. Researchers can chart this epic migration in the DNA of people both alive and long-dead, but they were missing genetic data from South America, the last major stop on this human journey. The trio [...]

By | 2018-11-13T18:40:38-07:00 November 14th, 2018|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on David Meltzer, Anthropology, ancient DNA reveals complex migrations of first Americans
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