Two-Minute Take: Interest Rates and the Housing Market

GEORGE W. BUSH INSTITUTE Cullum Clark is Director of the Bush Institute-SMU Economic Growth Initiative and an SMU Adjunct Professor of Economics The Federal Reserve is considering slowing down interest rate hikes in 2019. What does this mean for home buyers? Twitter Facebook Should the Fed decide to slow down its path of interest rate increases in 2019, how will it impact the housing market? The Wall Street Journal reported that the Federal Reserve is reconsidering its prior intention of imposing three or more increases in its benchmark interest rate during 2019. This emerging caution on the part of U.S. monetary policy-makers reflects growing concerns about signs of economic weakness abroad and the potential impact of U.S.-Chinese trade disputes on the domestic economy. All else equal, lower interest [...]

By | 2018-12-11T11:24:24+00:00 December 19th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Two-Minute Take: Interest Rates and the Housing Market

Don’t Blame Trade for Killing the Middle-Tier Jobs We Need

The Catalyst Originally Posted: Fall 2018 An Essay by James Lake, Associate Professor of Economics at SMU Dedman College The polarization of the U.S. labor market has resulted in availability of high-skill jobs as well as availability of low-skill jobs. The lack of jobs in between those two ends of the spectrum presents a problem for our country. The hourglass economy: We've seen job growth at the top and bottom of the job market, but not in the middle. If you want to understand why the middle class is under such pressure, look no further than the decline in jobs for middle-skilled workers. At the very time that a growing share of U.S. workers have landed high-skilled or low-skilled jobs, opportunities for workers in mid-wage, [...]

By | 2018-11-26T10:29:22+00:00 November 26th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Don’t Blame Trade for Killing the Middle-Tier Jobs We Need

How Women’s Suffrage Improved Education for a Whole Generation of Children

The Atlantic Originally Published: August 28, 2018 The Atlantic article references a recent study by three economists—Dartmouth College’s Na’ama Shenhav, Bucknell University’s Esra Kose, and Southern Methodist University’s Elira Kuka that suggests women’s suffrage improved education and contributed to kids staying in school longer. When the United States ratified the Nineteenth Amendment nearly a century ago, the law’s immediate impact extended far beyond giving women the right to vote. Women’s suffrage—widely viewed as one of the 20th century’s most important events—coincided with a growing (if gradual) embrace of gender equality, increased social spending, and a greater tendency among politicians to take a progressive stance on legislative proposals. Evidence suggests that women’s suffrage also corresponded with a significant increase in municipal spending on charities and hospitals, as well as on social programs; one study found that when women [...]

By | 2018-08-31T09:42:21+00:00 August 31st, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on How Women’s Suffrage Improved Education for a Whole Generation of Children

A new survey reveals that not only do business executives value college, they want students with skills associated with the liberal arts.

Inside Higher Ed Originally Posted: August 28, 2018 Public May Not Trust Higher Ed, but Employers Do  A new survey reveals that not only do business executives value college, they want students with skills associated with the liberal arts. Though public support for higher education seems to be waning, this skepticism doesn’t appear to extend to potential employers, who say they still have faith in colleges and universities, according to a new survey conducted on behalf of the Association of American Colleges & Universities. But while executives and hiring managers believe that institutions are teaching graduates the skills needed for entry-level jobs, they reported that students usually aren’t ready to be promoted. AAC&U commissioned the Washington, D.C.-based Hart Research Associates to survey two groups: 500 or so business [...]

By | 2018-08-28T10:01:16+00:00 August 28th, 2018|Anthropology, Biology, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Earth Sciences, Economics, English, History, Mathematics, Philosophy, Physics, Political Science, Psychology, Religious Studies, Sociology, Statistical Science, Undergraduate News, World Languages and Literatures|Comments Off on A new survey reveals that not only do business executives value college, they want students with skills associated with the liberal arts.

What I Did Last Summer: Ben Prengler ’19

Ben Prengler spent his summer in Washington D.C. as a Space Policy Intern at the White House. About Ben Prengler: I am triple majoring in political science, economics and public policy, and double minoring in public policy and international affairs and philosophy. I am from Fairview, Texas, which is between Allen and McKinney. At SMU, I am the Speaker of the Student Senate, an undergraduate fellow with the Medders Fellowship through the Tower Center doing research in multiculturalism, an HCM Tower Scholar, and a member of Pi Sigma Alpha (Political Science Honor Society) and Omicron Delta Epsilon (Economics Honor Society). Outside of SMU, I’ve worked on three political campaigns: two for the U.S. Congress, and one for the Texas House of Representatives. In one Congressional [...]

By | 2018-08-22T11:42:14+00:00 August 22nd, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Economics, Philosophy, Political Science, Tower Center, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on What I Did Last Summer: Ben Prengler ’19

The Bookshelf: Five books with surprising insights into economic growth

George W. Bush Institute Originally Posted: August 6, 2018 by J.H. Cullum Clark As these five books illustrate, insights into economic growth sometimes show up in surprising places. Bruce Springsteen’s iconic song “Born to Run” topped the music charts and his book of the same title made the bestseller list, but most people don’t think of him as contributing to discussions of economic policy. Consider, though, that the story of economic growth is not just about numbers. It’s actually a story of people, creativity, near-misses, and improbable breakthroughs. And it teaches us that we can’t take growth for granted. Springsteen’s memoir Born to Run provides music fans with a highly readable account of the enormous commitment and sustained hard work at the heart of human [...]

By | 2018-08-07T18:36:00+00:00 August 7th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on The Bookshelf: Five books with surprising insights into economic growth

Cullum Clark, Economics, some Dallas shops and eateries are going cashless

D Magazine Originally Posted: July 30, 2018 About two months ago, I walked into a Van Leeuwen ice cream store in Los Angeles. After ordering, I was befuddled to see my dollars bills rejected. “We only accept debit or credit card here,” the man behind the pastel yellow bar patiently explained. The experience threw me into a mini-existential crisis. Because this ice cream man only respected the value of something as intangible and digital as credit, I had to cough up some plastic to earn my scoop of dairy? Should I also be investing in Bitcoin, I panicked? Of course, I calmed down at the first taste of ice cream. My first encounter with a cash-free retailer was not my last. Stores and restaurants across [...]

By | 2018-07-31T08:25:33+00:00 August 2nd, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Cullum Clark, Economics, some Dallas shops and eateries are going cashless

SMU alum moves company headquarters to Houston, announce residency at the world’s largest medical complex

PR Log Originally Posted: July 25, 2018 Edward Allegra, co-founder and CEO of BioLum Sciences graduated from SMU in 2014 with degrees in biology and economics. BioLum Sciences Announces Residency at JLABS @ TMC BioLum Sciences is pleased to announce residency at Johnson & Johnson Innovation, JLABS at the Texas Medical Center (JLABS @ TMC) - the world's largest medical complex. As a result, BioLum has relocated its company headquarters from Dallas, TX to Houston, TX. "The TMC ecosystem provides us with numerous opportunities for collaborations and partnerships that will undoubtedly play key roles in the commercialization of our technology," said Edward Allegra, co-founder and CEO of BioLum Sciences. "We couldn't be more excited to be surrounded by other startups and industry leaders who are at [...]

By | 2018-08-02T08:52:11+00:00 July 31st, 2018|Biology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Economics, Graduate News|Comments Off on SMU alum moves company headquarters to Houston, announce residency at the world’s largest medical complex

Danila Serra, Economics, The National Push To Integrate Women Into STEM Fields

University Network Originally Posted: July 24, 2018 Women now make up 45.8 percent of the professional U.S. workforce. Unfortunately, while many strides have been taken to integrate women into a broad range of professional occupations, the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) still hold significant gender gaps. But diversity fosters development in every work environment. “Diversity is at the core of innovation. Not just gender diversity, but diversity of thought,” said Joe Vacca, chief marketing officer of Revature, a leading technology talent development company. “It is imperative that we close the gender gap in technology.” Overall, women earn 57 percent of the college degrees, but the tech world is still very much a boys’ club. The problem lies in the social barriers that push women away from participating [...]

By | 2018-07-25T10:41:19+00:00 July 25th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Danila Serra, Economics, The National Push To Integrate Women Into STEM Fields
Load More Posts