Today, March 5: SMU Giving Day

One day. For 24 hours on March 5, the entire SMU community will come together to give back and celebrate the causes we care about – supporting students, improving cities, educating teachers, fighting for justice, fueling champions – together, the possibilities are endless. Please consider supporting a Dedman College cause: Dedman College Scholars Dean’s Research Council SMU Human Rights SMU Fund for Dedman College Data Hackathon Challenges: Dean’s Research Council Match Gifts made to the Dedman College Dean’s Research Council will be matched dollar-for-dollar up to $10,000. Thank you to generous donors, Dr. Anthony Aramoonie ‘94 and Nicole Aramoonie for making this possible! Dedman College Scholars Challenge Support scholarships and help us meet the challenge from longtime SMU supporters Carl Sewell ’66 and Peggy Higgins [...]

Direction of Dallas and Urban Growth

New Geography Originally Posted: Feb. 23, 2019 Should the direction of Dallas urban growth continue to grow north? Does inserting low-income housing in North Dallas create an inclusive urban growth direction for Dallas? Does the direction of Dallas and its current goal of moving low-income wage earners closer to higher wage jobs in North Dallas increase or decrease wealth for low-income families? The SMU/George W. Bush Institute Conference, Policies to Promote Inclusive Urban Growth, was a meaningful conference on the direction of Dallas and cities and gave clues to all these questions. The information and insights provided built on and went beyond the New Cities Conference held a few years ago in Dallas, the Festival of Ideas Conference in Dallas, and the 2.0 Cities section [...]

By | 2019-02-27T11:20:50+00:00 February 27th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Events, Faculty News|Comments Off on Direction of Dallas and Urban Growth

Urban Revitalization Is Not “One Size Fits All”

Forbes Originally Posted: Feb. 5, 2019 Adopting a one-size-fits-all approach to problem solving is almost never a good policy. What works well in one context could be precisely the wrong thing to do in another. Use an axe to cut down a massive tree; use a scalpel to conduct a delicate surgery. Switching one for the other produces dramatically different results. When it comes to cities and revitalization, this absolutely rings true. I was fortunate to be a part of a fantastic symposium last week, called Policies to Promote Inclusive Urban Growth. It was held in Dallas at the George W. Bush Presidential Center on the campus of Southern Methodist University, and the event also served as the public release of a report which I worked on, Beyond Gentrification: [...]

By | 2019-02-07T08:04:18+00:00 February 7th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Urban Revitalization Is Not “One Size Fits All”

Affordable housing, better schools offer bridges to Dallas’ ‘have’ vs. ‘have-not’ gap

Dallas Business Journal Originally Posted: Feb. 7, 2019 Cullen Clark, director of the George W. Bush Institute-SMU Economic Growth ... Klaus Desmet, a professor of Economics at Southern Methodist University are featured in this article. There are solutions to narrowing a growing racial and ethnic economic divide in Dallas, including some practices that are already in place. But nobody said this would be easy. READ MORE

By | 2019-02-07T08:02:03+00:00 February 7th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Affordable housing, better schools offer bridges to Dallas’ ‘have’ vs. ‘have-not’ gap

How the widening racial wealth divide threatens Dallas, nation

Dallas Business Journal Originally Post: Feb. 6, 2019 When income polarization increases, the middle class thins out, says Klaus Desmet, a professor of Economics at Southern Methodist University. Dallas has had lower unemployment and a stronger economy than most major U.S. cities over the past decade, but racial economic inequality in the city is much higher than it is nationwide. And the divide is growing. READ MORE

By | 2019-02-07T07:58:51+00:00 February 7th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on How the widening racial wealth divide threatens Dallas, nation

Promoting Inclusive Urban Growth: A Call To Action

Bush Center Originally Posted: Feb. 5, 2019 Many U.S. cities face growing challenges in building economies in which each generation lives better than the one before. A significant part of the challenge is rooted in home affordability, as lower- and middle-income people increasingly can’t afford to live in high-opportunity areas and are seeing more of their income consumed by housing costs. The urban middle class is shrinking, and cities are becoming bifurcated into “have” and “have-not” neighborhoods. These patterns pose a threat to upward mobility, for three reasons. First, when lower- and middle-skilled Americans live far from high-opportunity areas it’s difficult for them to access to good jobs, particularly in highly productive, knowledge-rich cities. Also, families in areas with low “social capital” –high poverty and [...]

By | 2019-02-06T06:02:04+00:00 February 6th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Events, Faculty News|Comments Off on Promoting Inclusive Urban Growth: A Call To Action

What 4 economists say about the state of the union

The Conversation Originally Posted: January 30, 2019 This is an excerpt of a January 30 article from The Conversation. Read the full version here. The State of the Union is back on after Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi said she invited President Donald Trump to address Congress and the nation on Feb. 5. Earlier, she had disinvited the president from giving the speech in the House on the scheduled date of Jan. 29. While we await Trump’s address, we asked four economists to give us their own assessments of the state of the union, as well as the president’s performance so far. Each picked a theme State of trade: Uncertainty and trade wars James Lake, Southern Methodist University American trade with the world is crucial to the U.S. [...]

By | 2019-01-31T09:40:38+00:00 January 31st, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on What 4 economists say about the state of the union

Watch Live: Policies to Promote Inclusive Urban Growth

Youtube Originally Posted: January 31, 2019 https://youtu.be/Kk7DVPVgyAk THEMES TO BE FEATURED What can American cities do to better promote upward mobility among people who feel left behind by economic growth in their city and nationwide? How can American cities successfully stabilize neighborhoods, revive the urban middle class, and address the growing attainable housing crisis? IN DEPTH How to Make Urban Growth More Inclusive: The Dallas Experience SCHEDULE OF EVENTS View speaker bios 8:30 a.m. Welcome Remarks 8:40 a.m. Panel: Urban Growth in America Topic: New evidence from the field on the experiences of Southern California, Chicago, and Dallas, based on the new report “Beyond Gentrification Towards More Equitable Urban Growth" Cullum Clark, Director of Economic Growth, George W. Bush Institute Karla Lopez del Rio, Principal, Connexions Consulting Pete Saunders, Urban Planning [...]

By | 2019-01-31T09:32:01+00:00 January 31st, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Watch Live: Policies to Promote Inclusive Urban Growth

Two-Minute Take: Interest Rates and the Housing Market

GEORGE W. BUSH INSTITUTE Cullum Clark is Director of the Bush Institute-SMU Economic Growth Initiative and an SMU Adjunct Professor of Economics The Federal Reserve is considering slowing down interest rate hikes in 2019. What does this mean for home buyers? Twitter Facebook Should the Fed decide to slow down its path of interest rate increases in 2019, how will it impact the housing market? The Wall Street Journal reported that the Federal Reserve is reconsidering its prior intention of imposing three or more increases in its benchmark interest rate during 2019. This emerging caution on the part of U.S. monetary policy-makers reflects growing concerns about signs of economic weakness abroad and the potential impact of U.S.-Chinese trade disputes on the domestic economy. All else equal, lower interest [...]

By | 2018-12-11T11:24:24+00:00 December 19th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Two-Minute Take: Interest Rates and the Housing Market

Don’t Blame Trade for Killing the Middle-Tier Jobs We Need

The Catalyst Originally Posted: Fall 2018 An Essay by James Lake, Associate Professor of Economics at SMU Dedman College The polarization of the U.S. labor market has resulted in availability of high-skill jobs as well as availability of low-skill jobs. The lack of jobs in between those two ends of the spectrum presents a problem for our country. The hourglass economy: We've seen job growth at the top and bottom of the job market, but not in the middle. If you want to understand why the middle class is under such pressure, look no further than the decline in jobs for middle-skilled workers. At the very time that a growing share of U.S. workers have landed high-skilled or low-skilled jobs, opportunities for workers in mid-wage, [...]

By | 2018-11-26T10:29:22+00:00 November 26th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on Don’t Blame Trade for Killing the Middle-Tier Jobs We Need
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