SMU Classes Resume, Virtual-only on Monday

SMU will resume classes next week with virtual-only academic instruction on Monday, February 22, 2021. The decision on virtual and/or in-person classes on Tuesday and beyond will be announced by Monday. Graduate students with Saturday classes should expect to hear from the deans of their schools if instruction will occur. Crews from the Office of Facilities Planning and Management and Office of Information Technology are working diligently to assess and repair damage to various buildings caused by this unusual winter blast, as well as ensuring all technology in classrooms are in working order. We will provide an update later today on facilities that will be open this weekend. At this time Hughes-Trigg Student Center is open as a warming and charging-up location Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports [...]

These Monstrous Texas Sinkholes Are Getting Bigger, And Here’s Why We Should Be Worried Read More: These Monstrous Texas Sinkholes Are Getting Bigger

KNUE OriginallyPosted: February 2, 2021 Everything is bigger in Texas - we know that. The food, the trucks, the pride...you get the idea. But we do have a concern (or two) out in West Texas that we really shouldn't be that proud of. They're called the Wink Sinks - two monstrous sinkholes out in Winkler County. For officials out in West Texas, this isn't anything new. In fact, the sinkholes first made an appearance in 1980. They've now grown so large, that they could possibly unite and cause "catastrophic" damage. That's not something I want to see. Ever. According to Atlas Obscura, decades of drilling for oil and gas in Winkler County, especially during the peak years between 1926 and 1964, have resulted in an extremely unstable [...]

By | 2021-02-02T09:03:46-08:00 February 2nd, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on These Monstrous Texas Sinkholes Are Getting Bigger, And Here’s Why We Should Be Worried Read More: These Monstrous Texas Sinkholes Are Getting Bigger

Watch the December Commencement Convocation Live

December 19, 1pm: December Commencement Convocation - The ceremony will be in Ford Stadium at 1 p.m. for students and their guests. We encourage all others to join us online for the live broadcast.

Prevent the flu at SMU

SMU health officials urge students, faculty and staff to take preventive measures to protect their health against the flu. Because flu can spread by contact with people who are ill, SMU health officials recommend getting a flu shot when they become available. FREE flu vaccinations are available for all students starting September 21. For your safety, we will be administering shots at flu shot stations outside the Health Center. NO APPOINTMENT NEEDED! Getting a flu shot this year will be far more important than ever this year due to COVID-19. READ MORE

SMU COVID-19 Dashboard

SMU News SMU has a new COVID-19 dashboard. Please use this to stay informed about quarantine numbers and isolation capacity levels. https://blog.smu.edu/coronavirus-covid-19/cases/  

Dinosaurs’ unique bone structure helped them support their large weight

CNN Originally Posted: August 19, 2020 Some dinosaurs were so big the ground would have shaken while they walked. But how did they carry such massive loads? Dinosaurs likely had a different bone structure to mammals and birds that was uniquely capable of supporting huge weights, a new study has found. A team of paleontologists, mechanical and biomedical engineers examined the upper and lower leg bones of duck-billed hadrosaurs and sauropods, long-necked and big-bodied plant eaters, whose fossils have been found on every continent. "The structure of the trabecular, or spongy bone that forms in the interior of (the)bones we studied is unique within dinosaurs," said AnthonyFiorillo, a Southern Methodist University paleontologist and one of the authors of the study that published Wednesday in the [...]

By | 2020-09-02T10:35:23-07:00 September 2nd, 2020|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Dinosaurs’ unique bone structure helped them support their large weight

Welcome Back!

There’s no doubt that the pandemic has changed how we live, learn, work and teach. We’ve been working hard across campus to welcome our new and continuing Mustangs this fall! Take a look at how we’re taking health and safety to heart as we continue to provide the high-quality academic and campus experiences that make up the signature SMU education. READ MORE

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