SMU alumna, archaeologist and paleontologist Myria Perez, is among those being honored with a statue at NorthPark Center

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: June 2, 2021 Jennifer Stimpson was 9 when she decided she wanted to be a scientist. She grew up in Oak Cliff working summers in her family’s West Dallas compounding pharmacy, where she watched her father — Stimpson’s first science mentor — do more than just dispense medications for his customers. “As he was making these medicines for folks, he would talk to them about health care and health care practices, and he made sure that they recognized what they needed to do to get better,” says Stimpson, a veteran science teacher in Dallas for two decades. “So, for me, I learned from my father how to pay it forward.” Stimpson, the first Black woman to graduate from the University [...]

By | 2021-06-14T06:26:59-07:00 June 3rd, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences|Comments Off on SMU alumna, archaeologist and paleontologist Myria Perez, is among those being honored with a statue at NorthPark Center

New duck-billed dinosaur species discovered in Japan

The Hill Originally Posted: April 27, 2021 A new type of duck-billed dinosaur has been identified on one of Japan’s southern islands. In 2004, an amatuer fossil hunter found the preserved lower jaw, teeth, neck vertebrae, shoulder bone and tail vertebra in an approximately 72-million-year-old layer of sediment on Japan’s Awaji island. The fossil was given to Japan’s Museum of Nature and Human Activities where it was stored before being studied by an international team of researchers from Southern Methodist University (SMU) and Japan. In a study recently published in Scientific Reports, researchers now say the specimen is that of a new genus and species of hadrosaur, or duck-billed dinosaur, they’ve dubbed Yamatosaurus izanagii. The plant-eating hadrosaurs roamed the Earth during the Late Cretaceous period [...]

By | 2021-06-03T06:27:02-07:00 May 24th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on New duck-billed dinosaur species discovered in Japan

New duckbilled dinosaur discovered in Japan

Eureka Posted: April 27, 2021 An international team of paleontologists has identified a new genus and species of hadrosaur or duck-billed dinosaur, Yamatosaurus izanagii, on one of Japan's southern islands. The fossilized discovery yields new information about hadrosaur migration, suggesting that the herbivors migrated from Asia to North America instead of vice versa. The discovery also illustrates an evolutionary step as the giant creatures evolved from walking upright to walking on all fours. Most of all, the discovery provides new information and asks new questions about dinosaurs in Japan. The research, "A New Basal Hadrosaurid (Dinosauria: Ornithischia) From the latest Cretaceous Kita-ama Formation in Japan implies the origin of Hadrosaurids," was recently published in Scientific Reports. Authors include Yoshitsugu Kobayashi of Hokkaido University Museum, Ryuji Takasaki [...]

By | 2021-05-04T08:41:05-07:00 May 1st, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on New duckbilled dinosaur discovered in Japan

Asteroid that wiped out dinosaurs probably helped create our rainforests

Washington Post Originally Posted: April 5, 2021 Sixty-six million years ago, a gigantic asteroid crashed into Earth, wiping out all kinds of life and changing the trajectory of the planet. It was bad news for dinosaurs. But in the tropical rainforest, their loss was flowers’ gain, a new study in the journal Science suggests. An international team of researchers used tens of thousands of fossils to explore what happened to plant life in what is now Colombia after the impact. Their work reveals that the crash was probably responsible for the modern makeup of tropical rainforests. Video: Investigating the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs The fiery crash is thought to have generated massive heat, triggered tidal waves and clouded over the sky. In the aftermath, as much [...]

By | 2021-04-20T09:55:18-07:00 April 20th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Asteroid that wiped out dinosaurs probably helped create our rainforests

SMU Giving Day is April 13

SMU Giving Day is April 13. There are over 20 different ways that you can support Dedman College. Check them out by visiting https://givingday.smu.edu/pages/dedman-college or clicking through the features list below. ALBERT SCHWEITZER FELLOWSHIP DEAN’S RESEARCH COUNCIL AT DEDMAN COLLEGE DATAFEST HACKATHON DEDMAN COLLEGE RESEARCH AND ADVANCED STUDIES FUND JEWISH STUDIES DEDMAN COLLEGE CANCER RESEARCH FUND SMU HUMAN RIGHTS PROGRAM CENTER FOR PRESIDENTIAL HISTORY DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF RELIGIOUS STUDIES DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT OF WORLD LANGUAGE AND LITERATURES SMU DEBATE TEAM DEDMAN COLLEGE [...]

Whitney Wolfe Herd to speak at Commencement

SMU News Originally Posted: Marche 21, 2021 DALLAS (SMU) – Whitney Wolfe Herd, founder and CEO of Bumble Inc., became the youngest woman to take a company public when she celebrated the initial offering of her dating app shares on the Nasdaq Stock Market in February. The 31-year-old entrepreneur and SMU alumna will draw lessons from her remarkable life story as the featured speaker at SMU’s May Commencement Convocation on Saturday, May 15. The outdoor ceremony, scheduled for 8 a.m. in Ford Stadium, will be streamed live at https://www.smu.edu/live. “Whitney Wolfe Herd may be the youngest commencement speaker we have ever had,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Our graduates will feel a sense of kinship with her as it has been only ten years since she walked [...]

Opinion: Got geothermal? Texas does and ought to tap the resource

Austin American Statesman Originally Posted: March 29, 2021 It is easy to look back at the recent Texas cold snap and identify the fixes needed in the energy grid. The oil and gas industry will also play a role in addressing the financial impact from COVID-19. Thus, the question becomes: How can we diversify our Texas energy portfolio while providing affordable and reliable heat, electricity and cooling? One answer: Tap the Texas geothermal resources. Geothermal energy is always on, rising within the Earth. This baseload, inexhaustible resource is below us everywhere. In fact, every oil and gas well already brings geothermal heat to the surface as a byproduct. During the 1970s and ‘80s, geothermal resources along the Gulf Coast were catalogued and proven extractable. Then initiatives to put [...]

By | 2021-03-29T07:37:12-07:00 March 29th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Opinion: Got geothermal? Texas does and ought to tap the resource

Save the Date: SMU Giving Day is April 13

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New research from SMU’s Louis Jacobs, Harvard University, and Japan’s National Museum of Nature and Science

Frontiers in Ecology and Evolution Originally Posted: March 22, 2021 A mystery about evolution is how quickly it happens. SMU's Louis Jacobs and researchers from Harvard University and Japan's National Museum of Nature and Science took a closer look at the evolution of fossil rodent teeth to shed some insight on this. READ MORE

By | 2021-03-22T11:27:25-07:00 March 22nd, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on New research from SMU’s Louis Jacobs, Harvard University, and Japan’s National Museum of Nature and Science

SMU Classes Resume, Virtual-only on Monday

SMU will resume classes next week with virtual-only academic instruction on Monday, February 22, 2021. The decision on virtual and/or in-person classes on Tuesday and beyond will be announced by Monday. Graduate students with Saturday classes should expect to hear from the deans of their schools if instruction will occur. Crews from the Office of Facilities Planning and Management and Office of Information Technology are working diligently to assess and repair damage to various buildings caused by this unusual winter blast, as well as ensuring all technology in classrooms are in working order. We will provide an update later today on facilities that will be open this weekend. At this time Hughes-Trigg Student Center is open as a warming and charging-up location Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports [...]

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