Study settles prehistoric puzzle, finds carbon dioxide link to global warming 22 million years ago

SMU Research Originally Posted: Nov. 14, 2017 Co-authors from the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences in Dedman College are professors Bonnie Jacobs, an expert in paleobotany and paleoclimate, and Neil J. Tabor, an expert in sedimentology and sedimentary geochemistry. Fossil leaves from Africa have resolved a prehistoric climate puzzle — and also confirm the link between carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global warming. Research until now has produced a variety of results and conflicting data that have cast doubt on the link between high carbon dioxide levels and climate change for a time interval about 22 million years ago. But a new study has found the link does indeed exist for that prehistoric time period, say researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. The finding will help scientists understand [...]

By | 2017-11-14T13:19:48+00:00 November 14th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Study settles prehistoric puzzle, finds carbon dioxide link to global warming 22 million years ago

Six Myths About Choosing a College Major

New York Times Originally Posted: November 3, 2017 Many colleges ask you to choose a major as early as your senior year of high school, on your admissions application. Yet there’s a good chance you’ll change your mind. The Education Department says that about 30 percent of students switch majors at least once. Students get plenty of advice about picking a major. It turns out, though, that most of it is from family and friends, according to aSeptember Gallup survey. Only 11 percent had sought guidance from a high school counselor, and 28 percent from a college adviser. And most didn’t think that the advice was especially helpful. Maybe it’s because much of the conventional thinking about majors is wrong. READ MORE

SMU Homecoming 2017- Come Boulevard with Dedman College

SMU Homecoming: November 4, 2017 Reconnect with friends and classmates on the Boulevard before the Homecoming football game on Saturday, November 4, 2017. Kickoff is at 6:15 p.m. and the parade on the Boulevard is at 3:15 p.m. Join us at the Dedman College tent immediately following the parade on the corner of Bishop & Binkley. You can find the Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences and Alumni Relations tent located on the old Natatorium site.

Inside Dedman College Newsletter, Fall 2017

Mustangs on the Move A Message from Thomas DiPiero, Dean of Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences  In Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, the Red Queen tells Alice that “here, you see, it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place. If you want to get somewhere else, you must run at least twice as fast as that!” The fast-paced lives of the students and faculty in Dedman College, who travel abroad for study and research, build out startup companies, protect the world from rogue aggression, and engage in taxing endurance sports would exhaust the Red Queen. But it’s all in a day’s work for these students, teachers, and scholars who somehow continually run twice as [...]

SMU Homecoming Kickoff Time Announced. Come Boulevard with Dedman College.

SMU Homecoming kickoff time is 6:15pm and the homecoming parade on the Boulevard starts at 3:15pm. Join us Saturday at the Dedman College tent on the corner of Bishop & Binkley for food, beverages, and cheering on the Mustangs!

Geology Undergraduate and Post Doc featured in Paleobiology Newsletter

The Fossil Record Current geology undergraduate, Myria Perez (page 4+), and form Post Doc, Dr. Ellen Currano (page 1+) are featured in The Department of Paleobiology Newsletter.         

By | 2017-10-13T06:44:15+00:00 October 13th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Graduate News, Undergraduate News|Comments Off on Geology Undergraduate and Post Doc featured in Paleobiology Newsletter

Heather DeShon, Earth Sciences, new study finds that the fault that produced North Texas’ largest quake could produce an even bigger one

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: September 25, 2017 The  town that experienced a 4-magnitude earthquake in May 2015 — the strongest quake ever recorded in North Texas  — sits on a fault with the potential to produce an event 10 times larger,  suggests a new study led by scientists at Southern Methodist University. The report also concluded there was “substantial evidence” that the quake, near the Johnson County town of Venus, was triggered by the underground disposal of wastewater from oil and gas operations. The study was the latest to investigate North Texas’ earthquake surge, which began in 2008 and has generated more than 200 tremors. The most recent widely felt event was a 3.1-magnitude quake that struck near the border of Irving and Dallas on Aug. 25. READ [...]

By | 2017-09-26T08:03:38+00:00 September 26th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Heather DeShon, Earth Sciences, new study finds that the fault that produced North Texas’ largest quake could produce an even bigger one

Researchers ask, how did that leaf get so big?

Dallas Innovates Originally Poster: September 22, 2017 The work of Southern Methodist University paleobotanist Bonnie F. Jacobs to help crack the mystery of leaf size recently got some recognition in Australian Geographic. Jacobs, a professor in SMU’s Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences, worked with a team of international researchers from — the United Kingdom, Canada, Argentina, Estonia, Spain, China, and the U.S. — and their work was published earlier this month as a cover story in Science. The team looked at 7,600 plant species over the past 20 years and pooled and analyzed the data with new theory in the field. Their goal is to create equations that can predict the maximum viable leaf size anywhere in the world based on two factors — daytime overheating and night-time freezing. That [...]

By | 2017-09-24T19:19:10+00:00 September 24th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Researchers ask, how did that leaf get so big?

SMU alumnus and paleontologist Thomas Adams discovers new prehistoric crocodile

Rivard Report Originally Posted: September 7, 2017 As a paleontologist and the Witte Museum‘s curator of paleontology and geology, Thomas Adams sees his job as being something of an interpreter. “We want to tell the Texas narrative because there’s a story to be told,” Adams said. “It’s already written in rocks. We just need to translate it.” For Adams, some of that translation is informed by his own discoveries. He has unearthed a new species of prehistoric crocodile, one he named Deltasuchus motherali and outlined in a recent scholarly article. The species was about 20 feet in length and a top predator in the food chain when it roamed Texas millions of years ago. Adams, along with co-authors Chris Noto at the University of Wisconsin-Parkside and Stephanie Drumheller-Horton at [...]

By | 2017-09-12T07:00:17+00:00 September 12th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Graduate News, Institute for the Study of Earth and Man|Comments Off on SMU alumnus and paleontologist Thomas Adams discovers new prehistoric crocodile

How scientists (including an SMU Dedman College seismologist) monitor North Korea’s nuclear tests

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: September 8, 2017 At 9:30 p.m. Central time last Saturday, detectors around the world picked up signs of a massive explosion in the vicinity of North Korea's nuclear test site. The country claimed, for the second time in less than two years, that it had successfully detonated a hydrogen bomb, a weapon far more powerful than the bombs dropped on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki during World War II. The last time North Korea said it had a hydrogen bomb, in January 2016, experts quickly dismissed its claim. This time, some say it's a possibility. "The magnitude of this event is bigger than any U.S. or Russian test since the early '70s," said Brian Stump, a seismologist at Southern Methodist University, which operates [...]

By | 2017-09-10T18:40:44+00:00 September 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on How scientists (including an SMU Dedman College seismologist) monitor North Korea’s nuclear tests
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