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RSVP TODAY! Dedman College Community Mixer: Friday, November 5th

Dedman College Community Mixer

Date: Nov. 5, 2021
Time: 3-5 p.m.
Location: Dallas Hall Rotunda and Dallas Hall Front Steps

All Dedman College faculty, staff and students welcome.

Please RSVP by October 29, 2021: smu.edu/CommunityMixer.

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SMU Takes 4th at First Major Debate Tournament of the Year

Originally Posted: September 27, 2021

Download Press Release PDF

SMU finished sixth overall among 21 universities from across the United States at a season opening debate tournament in IPDA. SMU debate competed at the University of Southern Mississippi debate tournament this weekend (September 25 & 26). SMU finished ahead of UNT, University of Florida, Arkansas State University, the University of Arkansas and eight other universities. SMU debaters won 26 out of 42 preliminary rounds on topics such as climate change, COVID, and space exploration. That is a win/loss percentage of 62%.

In his first college debate tournament, Eric Ryan was selected as 4th speaker overall in the junior varsity division among 38 student competitors. Former novice national top speaker Emma Waite finished as the top seed in the professional division. Varsity debater Ryan Booth finished with a 5-1 preliminary record and the fifth seed overall among 42 debaters. He advanced to semifinals after winning octafinal and quarterfinal debates. Erik Rorem was 2-4 in varsity and Taylor Enslin narrowly missed advancing to elimination rounds with a 3-3 record and finishing as the 17th seed overall.

Savannah LaRoe was the 9th seed in novice division debate with a 4-2 record. She won her octafinal debate before losing in the quarterfinals. Hailey Hazen finished preliminary rounds with a 4-2 record in noice for her first collegiate competition. She won an octafinal debate on the topic of critical race theory before losing in the quarterfinals.

More than 140 competitors from across the United States were debating in the tournament. Universities in attendance included: Abilene Christian University, Arkansas State University, Belmont University, BPCC, Dallas Baptist University, ETBU, Howard Payne University, Jefferson State Community College Louisiana State University Shreveport, Louisiana Tech University, Middle Tennessee State University, Mississippi State University, OKBU, Park University, Southern Methodist University, University of Southern Mississippi, University of Arkansas, University of Florida, University of North Texas, University of Tennessee,Knoxville, and William Carey University.

SMU debaters were Ryan Booth, Taylor Enslin, Hailey Hazen, Savannah LaRoe, Erik Rorem, Eric Ryan, and Emma Waite.

SMU judges and coaches were Price Morgan, Jaden Warren, Ashlyn Williams, Martin and Dr. Ben Voth.

Student details:

Booth, Alamo, California, Senior, Political Science and Finance
Enslin, Garland, Texas, Senior, Political Science, Public Policy, and History
Hazen, Colleyviille, Texas, Sophomore, History
LaRoe, Dallas, Texas, Senior, Psychology
Rorem, Plano, Sophomore, Political Science
Eric Ryan, Plano, Texas, Freshman, Finance, Journalism, Science
Waite, Colleyville, Junior, Mechanical Engineering with a biomedical specialization
Ben Feinstein, San Antonio, Junior, History
Jaden Warren, Dallas, alumni, economics with finance and public policy

There were 42 teams in varsity debate. There were 14 teams in professional. There were 38 teams in junior varsity. There were 50 teams in novice. 146 debaters from 21 universities across nine states debated this weekend. SMU debate was supported by work and students from the SMU Honors program.

For more information, please contact director of debate and professor of Rhetoric Dr. Ben Voth bvoth@smu.edu 

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Boulevard with Dedman College for SMU Homecoming

Join Dedman College on the Boulevard!

Saturday, October 2, 2021

Connect with Dedman College alumni, students, faculty, family and friends for tailgating on the Boulevard for Homecoming Weekend.

Tent opens two hours before kickoff (time to be announced)

The Dedman College tent location is behind the Dedman College sign on the main quad.

We are looking forward to seeing you at the Dedman College tent!

Food and drinks provided but you must register before Wednesday, September 29.

Register

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Dedman College D&I Newsletter, Fall 2021

Read the latest Dedman College D&I Newsletter

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Welcome Back!

Originally Posted: Aug 23, 2021

Welcome back, Mustangs! Can’t wait to see you in class!

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Temporary mask requirement effective Aug 12

SMU News

Effective August 12, SMU is temporarily requiring masks (two or more layers covering the nose and mouth) in indoor spaces on campus, including classrooms, event and meeting spaces, and common areas in all buildings and residential halls regardless of vaccination status. Masks are not required in private spaces such as residence hall rooms for students with roommates.

All events, such as Convocation and orientation, should continue as planned with masks being used indoors. This requirement is a temporary precaution during the Delta variant surge to supplement our other pandemic protocols. We will continue to monitor and review industry-specific guidance and recommendations from the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and state public health authorities in order to make the best decisions for our community.

Check the Mustang Strong website for the latest updates and answers to questions about our campus response to COVID-19. Also, watch for upcoming Mustang Strong newsletters for quick reminders. READ MORE

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COVID-19 reminders for July term

SMU NEWS

As SMU moves into Summer Session II (July term), it’s important to maintain a healthy campus by diligently following SMU’s current COVID-19 protocols.

Here are some reminders.

  • Masks may be required by faculty in their classrooms. Instructors will notify students prior to the start of class in their course syllabus. A decision about mask requirements for fall will be made within the next few weeks.
  • For more information, please check the Mustang Strong website or scan the QR Code on signs posted at the entrances of campus buildings.

READ MORE

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TODAY: Understanding and Promoting Minority Mental Health: Virtual Reality, Community-engaged Focus Groups, and Beyond… With Dr. Pricilla Lui, Assistant Professor of Psychology

Date: Wednesday, June 16, 2021
Time: 12:00pm – 1:00pm

REGISTER HERE

Harold Simmons 117 or by Zoom.

Dr. Lui conducts research on minority mental health and health disparities.She is interested in how people from diverse sociocultural backgrounds make sense of the world, and how their lived experiences associated with culture, ethnicity, and race affect their psychopathology and addictive behaviors.Using a social ecological framework, she studies intercultural contact (e.g., acculturation, discrimination), close social relationships (e.g., romantic relationship, intergenerational conflict), and intrapersonal characteristics (e.g., personality, cultural orientations) as determinants of psychopathology, primarily alcohol (mis)use. Through this program of research, Dr. Lui  seeks to inform and influence clinical interventions that are most effective in alleviating distress and improving psychological functioning across diverse ethnocultural groups.To the extent that knowledge on the prediction and explanation of human psychology only is as good as our ability to assess these concepts, she has the expertise in scale development and evaluation of the quality of psychological measures.

Dr. Lui was named a Rising Star by the Association for Psychological Science and was selected by the Society for Clinical Psychology to receive the2019Samuel M. Turner Early Career Award for Distinguished Contributions to Diversity in Clinical Psychology. REGISTER

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Microaggression, Isolated Hate, and Systemic Racism

InsideSources

Originally Posted: April 18, 2021

BY: 

P. Priscilla Lui is a clinical psychologist and an assistant professor of psychology at SMU Dallas. She wrote this for InsideSources.com.

Many people have heard “microaggression,” but how many understand what it really means or looks like?

  • Wrongfully assuming that an African American student must have been admitted to a prestigious university because of an athletic scholarship, rather than academic merits.
  • Asking a Latina business executive to bring coffee or help clean up an office, as if she was a custodial staffer.
  • Insisting an Asian American person is a foreign immigrant, and then concluding the Asian American is “oversensitive” when they react negatively after that assumption.

Such examples of microaggression are more than cultural and racial naïveté. They often are racism in disguise, weekly impacting 80 percent of Asian Americans, and likely other people of color, according to psychological research. Amid the coronavirus pandemic, Asian American people, in particular, have experienced increasing frequency and severity of everyday slights and attacks.

At first glance, “microaggression” suggests intended interpersonal violence or insults that are small or trivial. But beneath that misnomer are bruises to the psyche.

Microaggression was coined by American psychiatrist Chester Pierce in the 1970s. The label gained popularity 10 years ago following the publication of a critical paper in the American Psychologist by Dr. Derald Sue and colleagues. Coinciding with decreases in major discrimination acts such as firing people of color based on race, microaggression most commonly has entered conversations to highlight the occurrences of subtle racial prejudice and unfair treatment in the United States.

Although the frequency of overt racism-related incidents declined until 2016, the U.S. saw an uptick in blatant race-based bigotry and hate incidents in the past few years. The killings of Michael Brown in Missouri, George Floyd in Minnesota, the death of a 75-year-old Asian American man in Oakland, California, and other deaths and injuries of Blacks and other people of color repeatedly brought national attention to systemic, institutional, and interpersonal racism. Since the summer of 2020 people have recognized the double-pandemics facing our country and beyond — Coronavirus and racism.

So, what do we do about it?

As a society, we should start by trying to better understand what constitutes microaggression and hate incidents, like the ones mentioned above. Conceptions and perceptions of these acts vary widely. Some argue microaggressions reflect that people of color are too quick to be triggered. Calling out microaggressions, to some, suggests the “perpetrators” are racist and bad, and undoubtedly puts people on the defensive.

For several years, ample diversity and racism-focused initiatives, and implicit bias reduction, and microaggression training programs have been rolled out and mandated in higher education and in the workplace. Still, training’s effectiveness hinges on the existence of common language and understanding around racism, discrimination, and microaggression.

Psychologists and people outside of academia were passionately different in their perceptions. To understand individual differences, my students and I conducted a study to shed light on people’s interpretation of the perpetrator’s intent and the harm endured by the victim. We found that the more ambiguous the microaggressions, the more varied people’s interpretations.

Much like the benefit of having words to describe illnesses associated with emotional difficulties (e.g., major depression, generalized anxiety disorder), microaggression can validate people of color’s lived experiences. Being aware of the stigmatization of people’s minority groups and attributing them to bigotry and unjust prejudice can protect the self-esteem of people of color.

In my interviews with research participants and class discussions with university students, many people believe that systemic racism is perpetuated even when individual victims do not take offense of isolated microaggression incidents. Dialogues about racism and progress toward achieving health equity are stifled when people of color’s racialized lived experiences are denied, when people are accused of being overly sensitive to race, and when perpetrators of microaggressions are on the defensive.

I have come to appreciate increasingly that isolated microaggressions cannot be taken at face value without recognizing the structural and systemic racism in the U.S.

Psychological research tells us that people intrinsically favor others who look like them and share their backgrounds. The preference for ingroups over outgroups makes it easy to fit people into stereotypes and develop prejudice. One way to combat microaggressions, major discrimination, and systemic racism is to (re)establish social norms that reinforce anti-racism. In a recent study, my research shows that people who have experienced everyday discrimination themselves are more likely to step in as bystanders to help Asian Americans who are victimized by interpersonal attacks or microaggressions. The shared experiences of discrimination may help people empathize with other victims of anti-Asian hate incidents.

Now is a good time to establish and adhere to policies that hold people accountable for biased practices and interpersonal microaggressions. Each one of us can continue to recognize personal and shared biases, validate and support victims’ lived experiences with major discrimination and microaggressions, and advocate for racial equity. When witnessing microaggressions, consider engaging in anti-racist bystander behaviors to help inform why well-intended complements or benign ignorance can be harmful.

In higher education and the workplace, diversity initiatives that are intended to prepare, recruit and retain students, faculty, and/or workers of underrepresented minority backgrounds will be as effective as the inclusive and anti-racist climate within the institutions and in society at large. READ MORE

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SMU Giving Day is April 13

SMU Giving Day is April 13. There are over 20 different ways that you can support Dedman College. Check them out by visiting https://givingday.smu.edu/pages/dedman-college or clicking through the features list below.