Microaggression, Isolated Hate, and Systemic Racism

InsideSources Originally Posted: April 18, 2021 BY: Priscilla Lui P. Priscilla Lui is a clinical psychologist and an assistant professor of psychology at SMU Dallas. She wrote this for InsideSources.com. Many people have heard “microaggression,” but how many understand what it really means or looks like? Wrongfully assuming that an African American student must have been admitted to a prestigious university because of an athletic scholarship, rather than academic merits. Asking a Latina business executive to bring coffee or help clean up an office, as if she was a custodial staffer. Insisting an Asian American person is a foreign immigrant, and then concluding the Asian American is “oversensitive” when they react negatively after that assumption. Such examples of microaggression are more than cultural and racial naïveté. [...]

By | 2021-04-20T07:56:43-07:00 April 20th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Microaggression, Isolated Hate, and Systemic Racism

SMU Giving Day is April 13

SMU Giving Day is April 13. There are over 20 different ways that you can support Dedman College. Check them out by visiting https://givingday.smu.edu/pages/dedman-college or clicking through the features list below. ALBERT SCHWEITZER FELLOWSHIP DEAN’S RESEARCH COUNCIL AT DEDMAN COLLEGE DATAFEST HACKATHON DEDMAN COLLEGE RESEARCH AND ADVANCED STUDIES FUND JEWISH STUDIES DEDMAN COLLEGE CANCER RESEARCH FUND SMU HUMAN RIGHTS PROGRAM CENTER FOR PRESIDENTIAL HISTORY DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES DEPARTMENT OF CHEMISTRY DEPARTMENT OF EARTH SCIENCES DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT OF ENGLISH DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY DEPARTMENT OF MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY DEPARTMENT OF PHYSICS DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT OF PSYCHOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF RELIGIOUS STUDIES DEPARTMENT OF SOCIOLOGY DEPARTMENT OF STATISTICAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT OF WORLD LANGUAGE AND LITERATURES SMU DEBATE TEAM DEDMAN COLLEGE [...]

How Anti-Asian Racism Fuels Discrimination & Violence

KERA Originally Posted: March 26, 2021 SMU professor Priscilla Lui studies racial discrimination and intercultural contact. She talks about recent incidents of hate against Asian Americans. From the recent brutal attacks that killed eight people in Atlanta to the thousands of instances of discrimination in the past year, anti-Asian hate crime is on the rise in the United States. Priscilla Lui is a professor of psychology at SMU who specializes in racial discrimination. She talked with KERA's Justin Martin. On what's behind the dramatic rise of anti-Asian violence: A lot of issues, but probably the most is Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders have always had this cultural, negative stereotypes against them in a sense that they have diseases, and there's inferiority about their cultural practices and behaviors. So [...]

By | 2021-04-01T10:01:20-07:00 April 1st, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on How Anti-Asian Racism Fuels Discrimination & Violence

Whitney Wolfe Herd to speak at Commencement

SMU News Originally Posted: Marche 21, 2021 DALLAS (SMU) – Whitney Wolfe Herd, founder and CEO of Bumble Inc., became the youngest woman to take a company public when she celebrated the initial offering of her dating app shares on the Nasdaq Stock Market in February. The 31-year-old entrepreneur and SMU alumna will draw lessons from her remarkable life story as the featured speaker at SMU’s May Commencement Convocation on Saturday, May 15. The outdoor ceremony, scheduled for 8 a.m. in Ford Stadium, will be streamed live at https://www.smu.edu/live. “Whitney Wolfe Herd may be the youngest commencement speaker we have ever had,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Our graduates will feel a sense of kinship with her as it has been only ten years since she walked [...]

Save the Date: SMU Giving Day is April 13

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A Neglected Problem: Understanding the Effects of Personal and Vicarious Trauma on African Americans’ Attitudes Toward the Police.

Event Date: March 12 Zoom (email for link) 2:00 p.m. CST Department of Psychology Research Colloquium. We welcome Dr. Ajima Olaghere, assistant professor of criminal justice at Temple University, for an invited talk entitled, "A Neglected Problem: Understanding the Effects of Personal and Vicarious Trauma on African Americans’ Attitudes Toward the Police." African Americans’ perceptions of the police are nuanced and complicated. Dr. Olaghere will share results from a study involving 77 African Americans in Durham, NC and their perceptions of the relationship between their community and police. The basis for perceptions and the characterization of them as trauma transmission will be discussed. For more information and to receive the Zoom link, please email Priscilla Lui at plui@smu.edu.

By | 2021-03-10T08:59:31-08:00 March 10th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Diversity and Inclusion, Events, Psychology|Comments Off on A Neglected Problem: Understanding the Effects of Personal and Vicarious Trauma on African Americans’ Attitudes Toward the Police.

SMU Classes Resume, Virtual-only on Monday

SMU will resume classes next week with virtual-only academic instruction on Monday, February 22, 2021. The decision on virtual and/or in-person classes on Tuesday and beyond will be announced by Monday. Graduate students with Saturday classes should expect to hear from the deans of their schools if instruction will occur. Crews from the Office of Facilities Planning and Management and Office of Information Technology are working diligently to assess and repair damage to various buildings caused by this unusual winter blast, as well as ensuring all technology in classrooms are in working order. We will provide an update later today on facilities that will be open this weekend. At this time Hughes-Trigg Student Center is open as a warming and charging-up location Dedman Center for Lifetime Sports [...]

Five Dedman College faculty members receive 2021 Sam Taylor Fellowship awards

Dedman College News Originally Posted: Feb. 12, 2021 Each year, the United Methodist Church’s Division of Higher Education and Ministry grants Sam Taylor Fellowship Awards to support faculty research that advances the intellectual and social life of our global society. Following a highly competitive selection process, the Sam Taylor Fellowship review committee is pleased to announce the 2020-2021 SMU faculty awards to the following faculty members: Congratulations to the Dedman College recipients: Wookun Kim, Ph.D.: Assistant Professor, Department of Economics Andrea Laurent-Simpson, Ph.D.: Lecturer, Department of Sociology Tomce Runcevski, Ph.D.: Assistant Professor, Department of Chemistry Holly Bowen, Ph.D.: Assistant Professor, Department of Psychology Neely Myers, Ph.D.: Associate Professor, Department of Anthropology Additional SMU recipients: Amber Bemak, MFA: Assistant Professor, Film and Media Arts, Meadows School [...]

By | 2021-02-12T12:14:30-08:00 February 12th, 2021|Anthropology, Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News, Psychology, Sociology|Comments Off on Five Dedman College faculty members receive 2021 Sam Taylor Fellowship awards

Autistic kids may have a harder time recognizing healthy vs. toxic arguments

Eureka Alert Originally Posted: January 27, 2021 DALLAS (SMU) - A new study suggests children on the autism spectrum may be more likely to misinterpret healthy arguments between their parents as being negative, compared to children who aren't on the autism spectrum. That means they may be missing out on an opportunity to learn from their parents how to handle conflict constructively, researchers Naomi Ekas and Chrystyna Kouros said. "Children can learn how to best handle conflict from watching their parents," said Kouros, associate professor of psychology at SMU (Southern Methodist University). "Seeing parents respectfully problem-solve during a disagreement provides children with examples of how to resolve conflict in a healthy way. But children on the autism spectrum may be missing the chance to benefit [...]

By | 2021-01-27T13:33:52-08:00 January 27th, 2021|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Autistic kids may have a harder time recognizing healthy vs. toxic arguments
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