Dallas Innovates’ Roundtable: Dean Knight and Other Leaders Assess STEM

As a future workforce takes shape, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics) plays a foundational role in education. To examine how business and education are collaborating on STEM, Dallas Innovates, a publishing venture between the Dallas Regional Chamber of Commerce and D Magazine Partners, invited a panel of experts to talk about the advancement.

Dean Stephanie Knight joined eight other leaders in the conversation, “STEM, STEAM, STREAM: In Dallas the Ingridients Are Here.” Read the three-part series:

Part One: https://bit.ly/31HcPTB

Part Two: https://bit.ly/2oedHBy

Part Three: https://bit.ly/2Jmes2R

 

Left to right: Oswaldo Alvarenga (Dallas ISD), Hilary Jackson (Capital One), Drexell Owusu (Dallas Regional Chamber), Jennifer Sampson (United Way of Metropolitan Dallas), Dr. Koshi Dhingra (TalkSTEM), Dr. Stephanie Knight (SMU Simmons School of Education), Dr. Jason Treadway (DCCCD), Sorabh Saxena (AT&T), and Byron Sanders (Big Thought). [Photo: Michael Samples]

 

 

WFAA and KERA Feature VR Surgery Developed By Professors Bing and Cuevas

Virtual reality surgery developed by Simmons professors Tony Cuevas and Eric Bing was featured on WFAA TV to show how technology designed at SMU can save lives in Africa.

A lack of surgeons and an increase in women’s cervical cancer on the African continent led Bing and Cuevas to develop training for doctors to increase surgical skill, speed, and accuracy. They traveled to Zambia and designed the virtual operating room based on what they saw in use there.

The desire to save women’s lives is a big impetus, especially for Dr. Bing. His mother, who lived in the U.S., died from cervical cancer.  Read more.

KERA 90.1’s Justin Martin also interviewed Bing and Cuevas to explain the virtual reality advances in surgery. For a video with Cuevas instructing a student, click here.

 

Bing and Cuevas Provide Virtual Reality Classes for Surgeons in Zambia

More women die of cervical cancer in Zambia than from any other disease. Why? Because not enough numbers of trained surgeons are available to help. But two SMU Simmons professors, Dr. Eric Bing and Dr. Tony Cuevas, believe virtual reality can train much needed surgeons.

Dr. Tony Cuevas (at right)

Bing, professor of global health, and Cuevas, clinical professor and director of instructional design, have been piloting surgery techniques with novice surgeons using virtual reality.

The technology they use is for in-home computer gaming and costs less than $1,000 per training station.

They have paired up with two other researchers, Dr. Groesbeck Parham, a professor of gynecologic oncology at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill and head of the CIDRZ Cervical Cancer Prevention Program in Lusaka, Zambia. And Dr. Richard Sullivan, professor and director of the Institute of Cancer Policy and Co-Director of Conflict and Health Research Group at the Kings College in London, England. Read more in D Healthcare.  Also see Dallas Innovates.

 

Dr. Eric Bing