WFAA and KERA Feature VR Surgery Developed By Professors Bing and Cuevas

Virtual reality surgery developed by Simmons professors Tony Cuevas and Eric Bing was featured on WFAA TV to show how technology designed at SMU can save lives in Africa.

A lack of surgeons and an increase in women’s cervical cancer on the African continent led Bing and Cuevas to develop training for doctors to increase surgical skill, speed, and accuracy. They traveled to Zambia and designed the virtual operating room based on what they saw in use there.

The desire to save women’s lives is a big impetus, especially for Dr. Bing. His mother, who lived in the U.S., died from cervical cancer.  Read more.

KERA 90.1’s Justin Martin also interviewed Bing and Cuevas to explain the virtual reality advances in surgery. For a video with Cuevas instructing a student, click here.

 

Simmons, Dallas ISD, and Toyota Recognize First Year Work to Develop STEM School

 

Superintendent Michael Hinojosa, Dallas Independent School District, and Dean Stephanie Knight, SMU Simmons School of Education and Human Development, speak about first-year accomplishments in the development of the West Dallas STEM School.

 

Toyota, Dallas Independent School District, and SMU Simmons School of Education and Human Development formed a partnership one year ago to develop a new STEM-focused school in West Dallas. This past year, the partnership successfully laid the foundation for collaboration and planning.

“Our partnership works because Toyota helps us understand industry goals,” says Simmons Dean Stephanie Knight.  “Dallas ISD,  one of the largest school districts in the country,  knows how to help public school students thrive and the West Dallas Community stakeholders provide insight into its needs. SMU is charged with providing research and evaluation that will enable us to improve public education.”

Six core teams have been actively engaged in co-design, focusing on curriculum, professional learning and distributed leadership, building design, community development, and research and evaluation. These teams also have participating members from West Dallas communities.

Additionally, support teams have focused on developing data infrastructure to support research and continuous improvements, developing communications strategies, and anticipating long-term sustainable funding.

Planning for the school is supported by a three-year, $2M grant from Toyota to Simmons. The school is expected to open in 2021.

 

 

 

Wired Looks at How Fast Humans Can Run with Weyand’s Expertise

Professor Peter Weyand, director of the Locomotor Performance Laboratory in Simmons, is featured in a Wired video and article, What’s the Fastest 100 Meter Dash a Human Can Run? The premise that reporter Robbie Gonzalez examines is if it is humanly possible to run the 100 meter dash in nine seconds flat. Usain Bolt, the fastest human, runs  the 100 meter dash in 9.58 seconds. A visit with Weyand in the lab determines the answer. Click here for the video and article.

Ketterlin Geller Joins NSF-Funded Committee to Broaden Participation in STEM

Professor Leanne Ketterlin Geller, Texas Instruments Endowed Chair in Education and director of Research in Mathematics Education, has been tapped to participate in CADRE, a National Science Foudation funded steering committee to broaden participation in preK- 12 STEM education.

Part of her contribution includes co-writing briefs based on NSF supported research that underscores steps educators can take to improve STEM.

She is featured in a video about this work, produced by CADRE K-12.

Vialogues at Columbia Teachers College Features Pavlakis’ Research on Homelessness

Assistant Professor Alexandra Pavlakis was interviewed for Vialogues, a video platform designed for Q&A’s, at Columbia Teachers College. The highlighted research was an article published in Teachers College Record, Contextualizing the Impacts of Homelessness on Academic Growth.

She also looks at local implementation of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Assistance Act (McKinney-Vento), which aims to reduce barriers to school success for students experiencing homelessness. She believes scholars often overlook this implementation but may play an important role in explaining inconsistencies between single-site studies.

Click here for her interview.

Feuerbacher Helps Organize Prosper Town Hall to Help With Suicide Prevention

Dr. Sarah Feuerbacher, director of Simmons’ Center for Family Counseling, helped Prosper residents organize a town hall after two people killed themselves during a 24 hour period. Her concern hit close to home since of one of them was her neighbor.

According to comments she made to NBC5, she said, “We need to be able to learn, we need to be able to do something for the families who are hurting right now and to help those who are hurting out there.”

Feuerbacher asked student interns to participate and provide counseling services to attendees who requested assistance.

 

 

 

 

Bing Takes Virtual Reality Surgery Simulator to the World Cancer Congress

Professor Eric Bing traveled to the World Cancer Congress in Kuala Lumpur to present how virtual reality for surgical training can positively impact health care in underdeveloped countries.

By discussing the Virtual Reality Surgery Simulator, which is a project created by SMU’s Simmons School and Guildhall, Bing shows that the technology reduces costs and is easily accessible. This is particularly important for locations with poor access to training facilities and staff.

For his video interview with ecancer.org, click here.

Celebrating Upward Bound’s Success on Campus for Half a Century

Upward Bound, the federally funded college access program created in 1964 by President Lyndon Johnson, has had significant impact on high school students aspiring to go to college. SMU and Simmons have hosted the program for 50 years, and now 98 percent of its students move on to earn their higher education degrees.  See media coverage.

Project ELVA Video Highlighted on 2018 STEM For All Website

Doris Baker, associate professor in Teaching and Learning, has one of her research projects featured in STEM for All, a National Science Foundation supported website. A video of her Project ELVA (English Language Vocabulary Acquisition) explains the benefits of using an intelligent design tutoring system to guide the instruction and provide prompts to support student language development in science.

Project ELVA was awarded $1,499,586 from the Institute of Education Science, 8/1/2014 to 7/31/2017. Baker’s co-principal investigators were Simmons Professor Stephanie Al Otaiba; Ron Cole and Wayne Ward (Boulder Language Technologies). Doctoral students Jillian Conry and Paul Polanco also assisted.

From Dispute Resolution: How to Apologize the Right Way

As of late, grievances are getting aired publicly, and so are apologies. But what goes into saying, “I’m sorry?” John Potter, clinical associate professor in dispute resolution, spoke with Dan Godwin @Fox4 about  how to construct an apology.