11/14 @ 1pm SMU’s Maria Richards will be testifying before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Subcommittee on Energy

SMU News Originally Posted: Nov. 13, 2019 SMU's Maria Richards, an authority on geothermal energy, will be testifying before the U.S. House of Representatives' Subcommittee on Energy about how to unearth the next wave of energy innovation using water and geothermal power. You can watch the live tweet Thursday, 11/14 at 1 p.m. CT here: https://science.house.gov/hearings/water-and-geothermal-power-unearthing-the-next-wave-of-energy-innovation  

By | 2019-11-13T10:32:02-08:00 November 13th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences|Comments Off on 11/14 @ 1pm SMU’s Maria Richards will be testifying before the U.S. House of Representatives’ Subcommittee on Energy

A Paleontologist, A Former Writer And Some Nerds Walk Into A Bar. This Is Profs And Pints.

KERA Originally Posted: Nov. 12, 2019 It’s 6:30 on a Tuesday night. Local brews, some cocktails, wine and food are filling tables at the Cambria hotel that looks out on Dallas’ still busy Elm Street. It’s lecture time. A budding business mixing spirits and scholars has come to Dallas. Profs and Pints is taking the traditional college class out of the lecture hall and into a bar. “Hello everybody, welcome to profs and pints… Thank you for coming out tonight,” says Peter Schmidt, who created Profs and Pints. His crowd of self-described geeks and nerds are especially into tonight’s topic – mosasaurs – giant sea creatures that swam around North Texas 72 million years ago. “Mosasaurs are actually one of my favorite dinosaurs,” said Shea Legters. That’s why [...]

By | 2019-11-13T10:24:09-08:00 November 12th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on A Paleontologist, A Former Writer And Some Nerds Walk Into A Bar. This Is Profs And Pints.

Myria Perez selected as one of 125 women innovators across the country to be AAAS IF/THEN ambassadors

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: Sept. 9, 2019 SMU alumna Myria Perez was selected as one of 125 women innovators across the country to be AAAS IF/THEN ambassadors. Their mission? To share their stories and serve as high-profile role models for girls. The percentages don't lie, and for women, the percentages aren't good. Only 37 percent of science, technology, engineering and math professionals portrayed in television and film are women. More than a few experts see a connection between such a low figure and whether young girls will choose to pursue STEM as a career. It is time, they say, to join forces in search of a new wave of STEM superstars. And pop culture — including television and film — is one of the ways to [...]

By | 2019-09-30T08:01:29-08:00 September 30th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Earth Sciences, Graduate News|Comments Off on Myria Perez selected as one of 125 women innovators across the country to be AAAS IF/THEN ambassadors

Alumna wins Emmy for NASA Coverage

Congrats to Dr. Sue Smrekar who received her Ph.D. in Geophysics from the SMU Department of Earth Sciences in 1990. She represented NASA last night at the Emmy's where they won 'Outstanding Original Interactive Program' coverage of the NASA In Sight mission to study Mars. READ MORE

By | 2019-09-16T11:07:46-08:00 September 16th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Graduate News|Comments Off on Alumna wins Emmy for NASA Coverage

Ancient Marine Fossils Unearthed in Plano

NBC 5 Originally Posted: August 8, 2019 Construction workers in Plano unearthed ancient marine fossils from a time when the city was under the sea. Crews found the fossils while working on the future Plano police substation at McDermott Road and Robinson Road. Steve Stoler, with the city of Plano, said crews only dug about seven feet into the ground before they found the fossils in a single 50-pound rock. "I don't know how many people realize this: in ancient times, this was an ocean. When you dig into the limestone shelf, it's not uncommon to find sea creatures and sea shells," Stoler said. "At the time these rocks were deposited, about 85 million years ago, Plano was submerged under a large inland sea," said [...]

By | 2019-08-08T10:35:28-08:00 August 15th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Ancient Marine Fossils Unearthed in Plano

New map outlines seismic faults across DFW region

EurekaAlert Originally Posted: July 24, 2019 DALLAS (SMU) - Scientists from SMU, The University of Texas at Austin and Stanford University found that the majority of faults underlying the Fort Worth Basin are as sensitive to forces that could cause them to slip as those that have hosted earthquakes in the past. The new study, published July 23rd by the journal Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America (BSSA), provides the most comprehensive fault information for the region to date. Fault slip potential modeling explores two scenarios: a model based on subsurface stress on the faults prior to high-volume wastewater injection and a model of those forces reflecting increase in fluid pressure due to injection. None of the faults shown to have the highest potential for an [...]

By | 2019-07-24T08:21:46-08:00 July 24th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on New map outlines seismic faults across DFW region

Explore the hidden wonders, technology happening right here in Dallas with Science in the City

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: March 8, 2019 This is an excerpt from a Dallas Morning News article. Read the full article here.  Register for Science in the City here. How to listen for earthquakes, feel the vibrations (and sturdiness) of bridges, and even make better bionic legs Did you know you can “listen” for earthquakes? No, it’s more than putting your ear to the ground to see if one is coming. Seismologists study seismic waves to see how strong an earthquake is and pinpoint its epicenter. They can examine these waves to detect a number of things, including nuclear explosions. At SMU’s Science in the City, you can learn how seismologists from SMU do just that. You’ll also get a chance to learn how the school’s engineers [...]

By | 2019-03-08T09:53:27-08:00 March 8th, 2019|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences|Comments Off on Explore the hidden wonders, technology happening right here in Dallas with Science in the City

Earth Sciences Faculty Remember Star Pupil and Friend Lü Junchang

Dedman College News Originally Posted: December 12, 2018 Faculty in the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences were stunned by the sudden death in October of Lü Junchang, one of China’s leading dinosaur experts and a beloved former student who received his Ph.D from SMU in 2004. Writing about his death in Scientific American, writer Richard Coniff called him one of the most important dinosaur researchers in the past half-century. Junchang, 53, was a researcher at the Institute of Geology at the Chinese Academy of Geological Sciences in Beijing.  Paleontologist Stephen Brusatte, in his 2018 book, The Rise and Fall of the Dinosaurs, described Junchang as having curiously accented English because of his Chinese cadence and the Texas drawl he picked up as a graduate student at [...]

By | 2018-12-12T11:11:33-08:00 December 12th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences|Comments Off on Earth Sciences Faculty Remember Star Pupil and Friend Lü Junchang

Zhong Lu, Earth Sciences, featured in Fortune Magazine

Fortune Magazine Originally Posted: May 25, 2018 Excerpt from an article titled Lone Star Rising in the May 2018 issue of Fortune Magazine: Zhong Lu, a geophysics professor at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, is part of a scientific team that has used satellite imagery to study what it regards as alarming land subsidence throughout the Permian. Over time, he believes, water from decaying oil-and-gas-related wells has leaked, dissolving subterranean salt layers and causing the ground to shift and ultimately, in places, to cave in. He warns that the industry needs to better shore up its aging wells against leaks. “We’re not trying to point fingers,” he tells me. “Everybody is enjoying the prosperity of oil and gas. But there’s technology we can use to [...]

By | 2018-05-30T09:20:08-08:00 May 30th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Zhong Lu, Earth Sciences, featured in Fortune Magazine
Load More Posts