CUL Digital Collections Update: February 2016

In February 2016, SMU’s Central University Libraries uploaded 399 items into CUL Digital Collections. CUL now has approximately 51,408 published items.

Highlights include:

Amon Carter Sr & Wife, ca. 1918, DeGolyer Library, SMU. Amon Giles Carter seated with his second wife, Nenetta Burton Carter (left), and her sister, Olive C. Burton (right).

Amon Carter Sr & Wife, ca. 1918, DeGolyer Library, SMU. Amon Giles Carter seated with his second wife, Nenetta Burton Carter (left), and her sister, Olive C. Burton (right).

202 items from the George W. Cook Dallas/Texas Image Collection as part of the Texas Treasures FY2016 grant program, sponsored by the Texas State Library and Archives Commission and funded by the Institute of Museum and Library Services. The items are comprised of real photographic postcards detailing daily life in various towns around Texas, ca. 1890s-1950s, as well as scenes showing military movements in and around the U.S. Mexico border during the Mexican Revolution.

15 items, 1939-1959, from the Robert Yarnall Richie Photograph Collection. Highlights include promotional images from the American Brake Shoe Company and Texas Gulf Sulphur Company. Also included are portraits of Torkild Rieber, former Chairman of Texaco, that were shot for Fortune magazine.

47 photographs from Views of New Almaden, depicting the California mercury mine and town, 1885-1895.

Catastrofe de Tacubaya, August 1913, by H.J. Gutierrez, DeGolyer Library, SMU.

Catastrofe de Tacubaya, August 1913, by H.J. Gutierrez, DeGolyer Library, SMU.

37 real photographic postcards from the Elmer and Diane Powell Collection on Mexico and the Mexican Revolution. The postcards, taken primarily by Antonio Garduno and H.J. Gutierrez, include group photographs of Mexican military officers and artillery, as well as the destruction of Mexican cities during the conflict.

7 negatives from the Everett L. DeGolyer Jr. Collection of United States Railroad Photographs showing Southern Pacific Railroad locomotives, ca. 1930s-1940s.

Dottie Coggeshall, Hollow Clay, Dallas Museum School, Dallas, 1966, by Octavio Medellin, Bywaters Special Collections, SMU.

Dottie Coggeshall, Hollow Clay, Dallas Museum School, Dallas, 1966, by Octavio Medellin, Bywaters Special Collections, SMU.

28 slides from the Octavio Medellin Art Work and Papers showing sculpture projects, mainly clay, and art students from the Creative Arts Center in Dallas, Dallas Museum of Fine Arts School, and Gainesville Art, Inc.

17 items (14 lithographs and 3 linocuts) by Jerry W. Bywaters were added to Texas Artists: Paintings, Sculpture, and Works on Paper. The prints show landscapes in U.S. West and Southwest, mainly Texas and Colorado; architecture; still lifes; and portraits.

[Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge Campaign Window Decal], Priddy Collection, DeGolyer Library, SMU.

[Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge Campaign Window Decal], Priddy Collection, DeGolyer Library, SMU.

21 items from the Hervey A. Priddy Collection of American Presidential and Political Memorabilia, including campaign portrait ribbons, delegate ribbons, and election tickets, as well as a window decal of Warren G. Harding and Calvin Coolidge from the 1920 Presidential election.

4 documents pertaining to the SMU men’s dormitory fire in 1926, including a floor plan, a bulletin, and two inventories.

7th Bengal Cavalry, ca. 1875-1889, by Lala Deen Dayal, DeGolyer Library, SMU.

7th Bengal Cavalry, ca. 1875-1889, by Lala Deen Dayal, DeGolyer Library, SMU.

7 photographs from Bengal Nagpur Railroad and Views of India, ca. 1875-1889, by Lala Deen Dayal, showing infantry, orderlies, camel soldiers, the 14th Sikhs, 7th Bengal Calvary, the Jamuna Bridge in Delhi, and a portable railroad.

10 Baldwin Locomotive Works builder’s cards of the Chicago, Burlington, and Quincy Railway.

About Cynthia Boeke

AA-CUL(CMIT)
This entry was posted in Dallas, Early Texas Postcards, Mexico photography, Railroads, Robert Yarnall Richie, Texas photographs. Bookmark the permalink.

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