SMU Geology Professor Neil Tabor to go to Antarctica

Omaha World Journal Originally Posted: November 15, 2017 Former Omahan Neil Tabor has embarked upon a journey to the geographic end of the world to study a past end of the world (of sorts) in hopes of preventing a future end of the world. The Central High and University of Nebraska-Lincoln graduate — now a Dallas-based geologist and professor at Southern Methodist University — is bound for Antarctica on a project funded by the National Science Foundation. He’ll be stationed for about 2½ months in a tent camp on the frozen continent’s east side studying rocks so old they predate the dinosaurs and even the existence of the planet’s formation of the seven continents as we know them. His job in Antarctica won’t be measuring [...]

By | 2017-11-22T08:34:19+00:00 November 22nd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on SMU Geology Professor Neil Tabor to go to Antarctica

Lynn Stokes, Statistics, selected as part of scientific team conducting independent abundance estimate of red snapper in Gulf of Mexico

Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium Originally Posted: November 17, 2017 A team of university and government scientists, selected by an expert review panel convened by the Mississippi-Alabama Sea Grant Consortium, will conduct an independent study to estimate the number of red snapper in the U.S. waters of the Gulf of Mexico. “American communities across the Gulf of Mexico depend on their access to, as well as the long term sustainability of, red snapper,” said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross. “I look forward to the insights this project will provide as we study and manage this valuable resource.” The research team, made up of 21 scientists from 12 institutions of higher learning, a state agency and a federal agency, was awarded $9.5 million in federal funds for [...]

By | 2017-11-20T08:26:21+00:00 November 20th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Statistical Science|Comments Off on Lynn Stokes, Statistics, selected as part of scientific team conducting independent abundance estimate of red snapper in Gulf of Mexico

James Hollifield, Tower Center, NAFTA talks resumed recently with tariff-free auto parts on the table

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: November 17, 2017 MEXICO CITY -- Officials for Canada, Mexico and the United States will renew talks here Friday, amid a cloud of uncertainty  and animosity that hangs over negotiations to revamp the North American Free Trade Agreement. As the talks drag on, now expected to continue through March, the possibility of any real gains are likely to become even slimmer as elections loom for the three countries, particularly Mexico, which holds presidential elections in July. Crucial midterm congressional elections are in November in the U.S. NAFTA could muddy the campaign waters even more, experts say. “The window of opportunity is fast closing in,” said Tony Payan, director of the Mexico Center at Rice University’s Baker Institute, which hosted a top [...]

By | 2017-11-20T08:32:37+00:00 November 18th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science, Tower Center|Comments Off on James Hollifield, Tower Center, NAFTA talks resumed recently with tariff-free auto parts on the table

Study settles prehistoric puzzle, finds carbon dioxide link to global warming 22 million years ago

SMU Research Originally Posted: Nov. 14, 2017 Co-authors from the Roy M. Huffington Department of Earth Sciences in Dedman College are professors Bonnie Jacobs, an expert in paleobotany and paleoclimate, and Neil J. Tabor, an expert in sedimentology and sedimentary geochemistry. Fossil leaves from Africa have resolved a prehistoric climate puzzle — and also confirm the link between carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and global warming. Research until now has produced a variety of results and conflicting data that have cast doubt on the link between high carbon dioxide levels and climate change for a time interval about 22 million years ago. But a new study has found the link does indeed exist for that prehistoric time period, say researchers at Southern Methodist University, Dallas. The finding will help scientists understand [...]

By | 2017-11-14T13:19:48+00:00 November 14th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Study settles prehistoric puzzle, finds carbon dioxide link to global warming 22 million years ago

Prestigious Academy welcomes SMU anthropologist

SMU Magazine Originally Posted: November 1, 2017 SMU anthropologist Caroline Brettell celebrated her election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences during a ceremony at the Academy’s headquarters in Cambridge, Massachusetts on October 7. The 228 new fellows and foreign honorary members — representing the sciences, the humanities and the arts, business, public affairs and the nonprofit sector — were announced in April as members of one of the world’s most prestigious honorary societies. In addition to Brettell, the class of 2017 includes actress Carol Burnett, musician John Legend, playwright Lynn Nottage, immunologist James Allison and many others. Brettell is the fourth SMU faculty member to be elected to the Academy. She joins David Meltzer, Henderson-Morrison Professor of Prehistory in Dedman College (class of 2013), Scurlock University Professor of Human Values Charles Curran (class of 2010), [...]

By | 2017-11-10T10:50:20+00:00 November 14th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Prestigious Academy welcomes SMU anthropologist

In New Study, SMU Seismologist Gets To The Bottom Of North Texas’ Strongest Earthquake

KERA Originally Posted: November 13, 2017 The same fault that produced the 4 magnitude earthquake in May 2015 in Johnson County — the strongest ever recorded in North Texas — could create an even larger one in the future, a recent study has found. Heather DeShon, a seismologist at Southern Methodist University, led the study that focuses on the quake that struck near the town of Venus. The quake in the Bend Arch-Fort Worth Basin was triggered by the underground disposal of wastewater from oil and gas operations, the report concluded. And it wasn't the first earthquake on that fault, which is a weakness in the earth's crust. Earthquakes have been happening in the area since 2008, DeShon said. Her team has also studied the [...]

By | 2017-11-20T08:28:46+00:00 November 14th, 2017|Anthropology, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on In New Study, SMU Seismologist Gets To The Bottom Of North Texas’ Strongest Earthquake

Documenting a transformative learning experience

SMU Magazine Originally Posted: November 1, 2017 Bearing witness to Poland’s deep physical and emotional scars that linger long after World War II – when the Nazis made the country the epicenter of the Holocaust – is the focus of a new book by SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program, No Resting Place: Holocaust Poland (Terrace Partners, $39.95). The large-format hardcover combines more than 200 contemporary photos of occupied Poland’s deadliest Holocaust sites with historical vignettes and poignant observations from those who have experienced one of the most comprehensive, longest-running Shoah study trips offered by a U.S. university. Each December, the two-week Holocaust Poland trip, led for more than 20 years by SMU Professor Rick Halperin, exposes students and lifelong learners to the Third Reich’s genocidal “Final Solution to the Jewish Question.” [...]

By | 2017-11-10T10:48:22+00:00 November 13th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Embrey Human Rights Events, Faculty News|Comments Off on Documenting a transformative learning experience

Tune in: Nov. 10 at 7pm, SMU English Prof. Greg Brownderville featured on Arts and Letters Radio

Arts and Letters Radio Originally Posted: November 10, 2017 The Dark Lyricism of Arkansas poet Greg Brownderville  Listen to the program On this episode of Arts & Letters, we talk with poet Greg Alan Brownderville, who discusses his latest collection, A Horse With Holes in It, published by LSU Press. This collection is interwoven with humor, compelling imagery and dark lyricism. "I wrote it in a blur, in a psychic state resembling trance, which is appropriate, given that spirit possession is at the heart of the collection. I accepted that it would fail or succeed on its own terms, as a ragged, jagged thing, not as a precious gemstone. If something felt right, even though I couldn’t explain why, I went with it. It is hard for me to remember anything about [...]

By | 2017-11-10T10:35:25+00:00 November 10th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, English, Faculty News|Comments Off on Tune in: Nov. 10 at 7pm, SMU English Prof. Greg Brownderville featured on Arts and Letters Radio

Here’s how George H.W. Bush guided America through the turbulent end to the Cold War

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: Nov. 8, 2017 When the World Seemed New is a remarkable book about a remarkable person. Southern Methodist University professor Jeffrey Engel describes in engrossing detail the patient and sophisticated strategy President George H.W. Bush pursued as the Cold War came to an end. Engel writes that Bush "guided the world through dangerous moments, whose peaceful outcome in hindsight continues to obscure their difficulty." Bush was one of those one-term presidents (John Adams is another who comes to mind) whose tenure tends to be underrated because of its brevity. Becoming president in the shadow of the intriguing relationship between Ronald Reagan and Mikhail Gorbachev, Bush's first move was to hit the brakes. He thought, notes Engel, that Reagan had been too [...]

By | 2017-11-09T11:31:30+00:00 November 9th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Here’s how George H.W. Bush guided America through the turbulent end to the Cold War
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