Embrey Human Rights Program Director, Rick Halperin comments on Arkansas death penalty plans in Huffington Post

Huffington Post Originally Posted: March 29, 2017 Arkansas’ plan to execute eight death-row prisoners over 11 days next month has been attacked as cruel and unusual in two federal lawsuits. Suits filed Monday and Tuesday seek preliminary injunctions halting the four double executions scheduled from April 17 to April 27, alleging the rush violates the condemned men’s constitutional rights. The suits name Arkansas Gov. Asa Hutchinson (R) and Department of Corrections Director Wendy Kelley as defendants. At a time when use of the death penalty is in gradual decline across the U.S., Arkansas Attorney General Leslie Rutledge announced last month the state would begin executing inmates who had exhausted state-level appeals. Arkansas hasn’t executed anyone in 12 years, and now seeks to jump-start lethal injections in ways that [...]

By | March 29th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Embrey Human Rights Events, Events, Faculty News|Comments Off on Embrey Human Rights Program Director, Rick Halperin comments on Arkansas death penalty plans in Huffington Post

Call for Research Cluster Proposals for 2017-18

The DCII offers a home for informal collaborative and interdisciplinary research clusters who wish to meet together at least twice during any given semester to discuss shared interests. These clusters should be open to faculty and graduate students from across the campus and should each have two faculty or grad student conveners responsible for the cluster’s activities. We welcome participants from other universities in the DFW area as well as from the broader community. Deadline for Proposals is May 20. For more information: http://www.smu.edu/Dedman/DCII/Programs/ResearchClusters

By | March 28th, 2017|DCII, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on Call for Research Cluster Proposals for 2017-18

Cal Jillson, Political Science, What Would It Take To Summon A Convention Of States?

KUT 90.5 Originally Posted: March 21, 2017 The following is from the March 21, 2017, edition of KUT public radio of Austin. SMU Political Science Professor Cal Jillson provided expertise for this story. Gov. Greg Abbott spent more than a year speaking and writing about the need to pass a series of amendments to the U.S. Constitution, in order limit the power of the federal government. His chosen vehicle: invoking Article V of the Constitution to call a “convention of states.” So when Abbott took the stage to deliver his State of the State message in January, there was every reason to expect he would spotlight the issue. But Abbott went one step further, designating it as one of his top four priorities for the legislative session. “Senator Birdwell and Representative [...]

By | March 23rd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science|Comments Off on Cal Jillson, Political Science, What Would It Take To Summon A Convention Of States?

FBI Investigation of Trump-Russia Connection

SMU Adjunct Political Science Prof. Robert Jordan discusses the March 20, 2017, testimony of FBI Director James B. Comey concerning an investigation into whether members of President Trump’s campaign colluded with Russia to influence the 2016 election. Jordan is former ambassador to Saudi Arabia and Diplomat-in-Residence at SMU’s John Goodwin Tower Center for Political Studies.

By | March 22nd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science, Tower Center|Comments Off on FBI Investigation of Trump-Russia Connection

Event: April 5, Long Stories Cut Short – A Reading and Book Signing

A reading and book signing with author Fredrick Luis Aldama. Sponsored by The Creative Writing Program and the SMU Department of English, Southwest Review; Red Pegasus Comics

By | March 20th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, English, Events, Faculty News|Comments Off on Event: April 5, Long Stories Cut Short – A Reading and Book Signing

Donald Trump is poised to do great harm to US cities (but not for the reasons you might think)

LSE USCentre Originally Posted: March 14, 2017 American cities collectively hold about $3.7 trillion in bonds, which have historically been used to fund capital expenditures. In recent years, however, bond issuers have been strategically leveraging municipalities’ debts via derivatives, which have introduced systemic risk into the municipal finance system. L. Owen Kirkpatrick writes that the Trump administration’s stated desire to dismantle the Dodd-Frank Act may speed up the current cycle of financial instability, and lead to more financial pain and misery for US cities. On February 3, 2017, President Donald Trump signed an executive order directing the US Treasury to begin dismantling the financial regulations established by the 2008 Dodd-Frank Act. On the surface, the order may seem to have little to do with the affairs of US cities. [...]

By | March 13th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Sociology, Sociology (Faculty)|Comments Off on Donald Trump is poised to do great harm to US cities (but not for the reasons you might think)

Self-persuasion iPad app spurs low-income parents to protect teens against cancer-causing hpv

Medical Xpress Originally Posted: March 7, 2017 As health officials struggle to boost the number of teens vaccinated against the deadly human papillomavirus, a new study from Southern Methodist University, Dallas, found that self-persuasion works to bring parents on board. Currently public health efforts rely on educational messages and doctor recommendations to persuade parents to vaccinate their adolescents. Self-persuasion as a tool for HPV vaccinations has never been researched until now. The SMU study found that low-income parents will decide to have their teens vaccinated against the sexually transmitted cancer-causing virus if the parents persuade themselves of the protective benefits. The study's subjects—almost all moms—were taking their teens and pre-teens to a safety-net pediatric clinic for medical care. It's the first to look at changing [...]

By | March 8th, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Psychology|Comments Off on Self-persuasion iPad app spurs low-income parents to protect teens against cancer-causing hpv

SMU Chemistry now accepting applications for new Ph.D. degree in Theoretical and Computational Chemistry

SMU Forum Originally Posted: March 6, 2017 SMU’s Department of Chemistry seeks to meet a high demand for well-trained computational and theoretical chemistry professionals with a new doctoral program. The department is now accepting applications for its Ph.D. program in Theoretical and Computational Chemistry. The four-year, 66-unit degree offers “an intensive and success-oriented education in computational and theoretical chemistry, with the goal to prepare students for a future career in academia or private industry,” according to the department. Mandatory courses include advanced computational chemistry, computer-assisted drug design, Hartree-Fock Density Functional Theory and electron correlations methods; and models and concepts in chemistry, symmetry and group theory. A minimum of five publications is expected for the thesis defense. The degree program also features extensive training in how to write a paper and prepare for presentations, interviews and [...]

By | March 6th, 2017|Chemistry, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Graduate News|Comments Off on SMU Chemistry now accepting applications for new Ph.D. degree in Theoretical and Computational Chemistry

Are earthquakes gone from our area for good?

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: March 1, 2017 NOTE: This story has been updated to reflect reaction to the study. North Texas is at the heart of a new scientific mystery: Where did all the earthquakes go? Quakes that started rattling the area around Dallas in 2008 came to a virtual halt last year, according to a new report by federal scientists.  That means the area's risk of experiencing a damaging quake dropped sharply — to less than 1 percent — for 2017, according to a one-year national earthquake forecast released by the U.S. Geological Survey Wednesday morning. “I was very surprised to see that we had no felt earthquakes during 2016" in North Texas, said Mark Petersen, chief of the agency’s National Seismic Hazard [...]

By | March 2nd, 2017|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Are earthquakes gone from our area for good?
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