New day, new poll: This time it’s good news for Beto O’Rourke, bad news for Ted Cruz

Fort Worth Star Telegram Originally Posted: September 20, 2018 Matthew Wilson, an SMU associate political science professor was quoted in this article. Is Republican U.S. Sen. Ted Cruz ahead? Or is Democrat U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke ahead? Two polls issued in two days paint two different pictures in the Texas-size battle for the U.S. Senate. A poll released Wednesday put O’Rourke up by 2 percentage points in the race. A poll released Tuesday put Cruz up by 9 percentage points. “These are snapshots of the race, they show a range,” said Matthew Wilson, an associate political science professor at SMU. “It’s not a pronouncement from on high about the state of the race. “Right now, it is unlikely that O’Rourke is really ahead by 2 [...]

By | 2018-09-20T11:38:57+00:00 September 20th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Political Science|Comments Off on New day, new poll: This time it’s good news for Beto O’Rourke, bad news for Ted Cruz

Q&A: Sea Monsters in Our Ancient Oceans Were Strangely Familiar

Smithsonian Magazine Originally Posted: September 18, 2018 Between 1961 and 2002, Angola was virtually inaccessible to scientists while the country struggled with war and civil unrest. Now, sixteen years after peace was achieved, never-before-seen fossils excavated from Angola’s coast will be on display in a new exhibit, called “Sea Monsters Unearthed,” which will debut at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of Natural History on November 9. In 2005, Louis Jacobs and Michael Polcyn, paleontologists at Southern Methodist University and collaborators on the exhibition, led the first major expedition in Angola since the acceptance of the plate tectonics theory in the mid-1960s. Dubbed Projecto PaleoAngola, the expedition looked to study the effects of the opening of the South Atlantic Ocean on life over the last 130 million [...]

By | 2018-09-18T10:17:12+00:00 September 18th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Earth Sciences, Faculty News|Comments Off on Q&A: Sea Monsters in Our Ancient Oceans Were Strangely Familiar

Immigration reform is rooted in Texas views, pollsters conclude

Dallas Morning News Originally Posted: September 12, 2018   The Bipartisan Policy Center says results of a survey to be released Friday support the view that Texas and its historic, pragmatic views on immigration are key to pushing for future reform. As the national debate over immigration rages on, conservative-leaning Texas is seen as an important bellwether state given its growing diversity, 1,000-mile border with Mexico and closeness to hot button topics ranging from sanctuary cities, the border wall, DACA to the separation of families entering the U.S. And those issues are complicated by a growing economy dependent on its immigrant labor force. The Washington-based Bipartisan Policy Center think tank said results from the nationwide survey, conducted in conjunction with Southern Methodist University, show that, [...]

By | 2018-09-17T08:45:36+00:00 September 17th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, History|Comments Off on Immigration reform is rooted in Texas views, pollsters conclude

Who Gets to Write an Anonymous Op-Ed?

Rolling Stone Originally Posted: September 6, 2018 Jeffrey Engel, director of the SMU Center for Presidential History, is quoted in this article. What does a Trump administration official have in common with a woman fleeing gang violence in El Salvador and a student in Iran speaking out against Ahmadinejad? They share the rare distinction of having written anonymous op-eds for the New York Times. On Wednesday, the Times published an anonymous op-ed by a senior official inside the Trump administration claiming to be part of “the resistance,” working to thwart Trump’s “worst inclinations” from within the White House. The author called the president’s leadership style “impetuous, adversarial, petty and ineffective,” and claimed to be working, along with “likeminded colleagues,” to limit the damage done by [...]

By | 2018-09-12T10:17:48+00:00 September 13th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News|Comments Off on Who Gets to Write an Anonymous Op-Ed?

LHC CERN Announcement: Why Higgs Boson Decay Observation Matters

Newsweek Originally Posted: August 30, 2018 Higgs boson, the once-theoretical particle that backs up our best scientific model of the universe, has been observed decaying for the first time—and this is excellent news as it means everything we understand about our physical world still holds true. The discovery of Higgs boson in 2013 provided support for the Standard Model of particle physics. It describes three of the four fundamental forces in the universe—the strong force, the weak force, the electromagnetic force and the gravitational force—and explains how matter interacts. While incomplete, it is our best understanding of how the universe works. By observing the Higgs boson decaying, scientists have more evidence in support of the Standard Model. Scientists working at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider made [...]

By | 2018-09-06T07:57:28+00:00 September 6th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on LHC CERN Announcement: Why Higgs Boson Decay Observation Matters

How Women’s Suffrage Improved Education for a Whole Generation of Children

The Atlantic Originally Published: August 28, 2018 The Atlantic article references a recent study by three economists—Dartmouth College’s Na’ama Shenhav, Bucknell University’s Esra Kose, and Southern Methodist University’s Elira Kuka that suggests women’s suffrage improved education and contributed to kids staying in school longer. When the United States ratified the Nineteenth Amendment nearly a century ago, the law’s immediate impact extended far beyond giving women the right to vote. Women’s suffrage—widely viewed as one of the 20th century’s most important events—coincided with a growing (if gradual) embrace of gender equality, increased social spending, and a greater tendency among politicians to take a progressive stance on legislative proposals. Evidence suggests that women’s suffrage also corresponded with a significant increase in municipal spending on charities and hospitals, as well as on social programs; one study found that when women [...]

By | 2018-08-31T09:42:21+00:00 August 31st, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Economics, Faculty News|Comments Off on How Women’s Suffrage Improved Education for a Whole Generation of Children

SMU Physicist Explains Significance of Latest Cern Discovery Related to the Higgs Boson

SMU Research Originally Posted: August 28, 2018 Stephen Sekula says observation of the Higgs particle transforming into bottom quarks confirms the 20th-century recipe for mass Scientists conducting physics experiments at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider have announced the discovery of the Higgs boson transforming, as it decays, into subatomic particles called bottom quarks, an observation that confirms that the “Standard Model” of the universe – the 20th century recipe for everything in the known physical world – is still valid. This new discovery is a big step forward in the quest to understand how the Higgs enables fundamental particles to acquire mass. Many scientists suspect that the Higgs could interact with particles outside the Standard Model, such as dark matter – the unseen matter that does [...]

By | 2018-08-29T06:21:41+00:00 August 29th, 2018|Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences, Dedman College Research, Faculty News, Physics|Comments Off on SMU Physicist Explains Significance of Latest Cern Discovery Related to the Higgs Boson
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