JFK:50 Exhibit at Fondren Library Center

jfk50The exhibition commemorates the assassination of President Kennedy in 1963 and features items from the Cabell, Belo, Marcus and personal collections including: correspondence sent to the Mayor of Dallas in the wake of the assassination; the speech President Kennedy was to give at the Trade Mart; newspapers, magazines, and books about the assassination; rare photographs; artifacts including a Bell & Howell movie camera similar to the one that filmed the assassination, and much more.

On display from November 11, 2013 – January 13, 2014
Fondren Library Center Lobby during open hours

Related:


About Fondren Exhibits

The Fondren Exhibits Committee is charged with providing educational exhibits for the SMU community that showcase special events, academic areas and individuals associated with the SMU campus.

2013 – The Year of the Library: Exhibit September 16 – November 11, 2013

2013 – The Year of the Library

September 16, 2013 – November 11, 2013
Fondren Library Center Lobby

yolLargeDuring 2013, SMU is commemorating the Year of the Library, a celebration of library firsts and of the continued importance of the libraries to intellectual life on campus. Programs and exhibitions throughout the year have provided opportunities to discover the rich resources and one-of-a-kind collections housed in the nine facilities which constitute the largest private academic library system in the Southwest.

Following the hiring of the university’s first librarian, Dorothy Amann, and the accessioning of the library’s first book, Marcus Aurelius and the Later Stoics by F.W. Bussell, in 1913, SMU was eager to eventually welcome students into the first campus library in Dallas Hall.

A lot has changed since then, and the Year of the Library has provided many opportunities for the growth of SMU’s libraries to take center stage. From the libraries’ collections crossing the 4 million volume mark, to a partnership with the George W. Bush Library and Museum, to a planned renovation of Fondren Library Center, 2013 has been an exciting start to the next 100 years of SMU libraries!

#yearofthelibrary images featured on Instagram

   insta01 insta02 insta03 insta04

 

yolRed

See more


About Fondren Exhibits

The Fondren Exhibits Committee is charged with providing educational exhibits for the SMU community that showcase special events, academic areas and individuals associated with the SMU campus.

Let’s Read – Library Figurines on display at Fondren Library Center through September 16th

Let’s Read: The van Breda Collection of Library Figurines

Exhibit dates: July 29, 2013 – September 16, 2013letsRead
Exhibit location: Fondren Library Center lobby

This exhibit is free and open to the public.

Nancy and Michael van Breda have been collecting reader figurines for over 20 years. Collecting readers has been a labor of love and one they plan to continue. Here is the story of how the collection began.

Nancy was an elementary teacher in Richardson ISD for twenty years. Michael was an accounting professor in the Cox School of Business at SMU for 32 years. They are both retired now.

01-hannahWhen Nancy came to Texas with Michael in 1981, her classes were racially very diverse. The textbooks and most children’s books were illustrated with white children at that time. Many of the children in the classes were not encouraged to read, did not have books at home and were not read to by other members of the family. Michael and Nancy kept thinking of ways to help these children see themselves reading as a joyful, rewarding and important activity.

Then on a visit to New Orleans Michael found a figurine of a young African American girl sitting in a comfortable chair with a book. Nancy put it on her desk at school without comment. One student studied it and then another. By afternoon, most of the students had noticed it and one brave child asked about it. Nancy said it was a present from her husband and would the child like to put it on her desk tomorrow. It was passed around during the following days from desk to desk. A few weeks later, a parent saw it and brought in a figurine of a white girl sitting in a comfortable chair with a book. The search was on to find more readers. The PTA helped and friends joined the search. By the end of the year, four reading figurines had been found. The next year the collection extended to adults reading and then animals. Benjamin Bunny was found in the Lake District in England standing on a pile of books and Pooh Bear was caught reading a letter. Many of the pieces were discovered on trips to other places.

Twenty years later Nancy and Michael van Breda donated their collection of 110 readers to the Fondren Library Center where they will eventually be housed in the new Children’s Area following the upcoming renovation. The collection accomplished the goal of providing role models experiencing the joy of reading. Nancy and Michael hope that the gift of their collection will continue to inspire generations of young readers for years to come.

Examples from the collection

025-matthew107-harry 003-story 035-cris104-dad  068-bears 094-dragons

About Fondren Exhibits

The Fondren Exhibits Committee is charged with providing educational exhibits for the SMU community that showcase special events, academic areas and individuals associated with the SMU campus.

Scares and Cults: Exhibit on display, June 21 – July 29, 2013

Scares and Cults

June 21, 2013 – July 29, 2013
Fondren Library Center Lobby

hensley
One thing that has generated a lot of Scares over the last 50 to 6o years are cults, and they still do. Cults have plagued and challenged established religions of every culture worldwide. Many scholars feel that many of the major world religions started out as cults. The cults that are displayed in this exhibit are North American and include Peoples Temple, Branch Davidians, Heaven’s Gate, Manson Family, Church of Satan, Southeast Snake Handling Cults, and the Fundamentalist Church of Latter Day Saints. The goal of this exhibit is to increase viewer’s knowledge of cults and to better understand them in terms of their historical, cultural setting. The books in the exhibit are only a few examples of the literature available in the SMU Libraries on this topic.

Resources available at SMU

chaosthemfamilyrecoverymidst


About Fondren Exhibits

The Fondren Exhibits Committee is charged with providing educational exhibits for the SMU community that showcase special events, academic areas and individuals associated with the SMU campus.

Southern Methodist University Campus Memories: A Digital Collection

Southern Methodist University Campus Memories: A Digital Collection

April 11, 2013 – June 24, 2013, Fondren Library Center Lobby

The SMU Campus Memories collection includes a wide variety of photos, texts, and videos of SMU during all phases of its history.

Although classes at Southern Methodist University started on September 1915, photographs of the Hilltop depict events that took place even before classes started. We have images of Dallas Hall under construction and during its building dedication.

Students, faculty, Presidents, staff and visitors are represented in these images.

Examples from the exhibit

Click on each image for more information

panoramaperunamapdallasHall


goesToPress

dedication


See More


About Fondren Exhibits

The Fondren Exhibits Committee is charged with providing educational exhibits for the SMU community that showcase special events, academic areas and individuals associated with the SMU campus.

From Text to Terabytes: On exhibit from January 22 – April 8

From Text to Terabytes

January 22, 2013 – April 8, 2013, Fondren Library Center ‘Link’

Over the past quarter of a century, computers have transformed almost every aspect of how libraries provide services and resources to their users. Research which once required the utilization of multiple print resources or a specially designed reading apparatus, can now often be performed by using a single database.

In this exhibit, we display some of the forms in which information was stored, organized, and retrieved before the digital age, and highlight some of the databases and tools that now make our lives easier.

terabytes


About Fondren Exhibits

The Fondren Exhibits Committee is charged with providing educational exhibits for the SMU community that showcase special events, academic areas and individuals associated with the SMU campus.

Exhibit: The Future of Fondren Library, October 25 – January 14

The Future of Fondren Library Center

About the exhibit: October 25 – January 14, 2013,
Fondren Library Center Circulation Area

The renovation of the Fondren Library Center will meet the diverse and changing information needs of the University’s students, faculty and staff. Reading rooms will be expanded and refurbished. Treasures in our Special Collections will be showcased in a graceful space as never before. All of these attractive, technology-rich and interactive features will promote innovation and will position the University for academic success.

The projected cost of the renovation is 19.2 M. Fundraising is currently underway and the project will start once 80% of the funding is secured.

Selections from the Exhibit

readingRoom
Grand Reading Room
cafe
Café and Browsing Area
infoCommons
Information Commons

See more


About Fondren Exhibits

The Fondren Exhibits Committee is charged with providing educational exhibits for the SMU community that showcase special events, academic areas and individuals associated with the SMU campus.

 

 

Exhibit: Notable Women at SMU, September 10 to October 19

Notable Women at SMU

About the exhibit: September 10 – October 19, 2012, Fondren Library Center Circulation Area

Many notable women have been involved in the founding and development of Southern Methodist University. They have been outstanding in their respective fields and in their commitment to the university. Featured in this exhibit are Ima Herron, May Whitsitt, Elise Golden, and Eleanor Tufts.

Dr. May Lee Whitsitt SMU Professor of Chemistry 1923-1941
Dr. May Lee Whitsitt
SMU Professor of Chemistry
1923-1941
Dr. Eleanor Tufts SMU Professor of Art History 1974-1991
Dr. Eleanor Tufts
SMU Professor of Art History
1974-1991
Dr. Ima Honaker Herron SMU Professor of English 1927-1931 and 1934-1966
Dr. Ima Honaker Herron
SMU Professor of English
1927-1931 and 1934-1966
Elise Hay Golden SMU Professor of Music 1922-1957
Elise Hay Golden
SMU Professor of Music
1922-1957

Example of materials on display

display

Also related

rememberRemember the Ladies! Discover Women’s History at DeGolyer Library. Celebrating over 100 years of women’s history from Texas and beyond, this exhibit is free and open to the public. The exhibit runs from September 10 through December 14, 2012 at the Degolyer Library. Hours are 8:30 am to 5:00 pm, Monday through Friday. For more information, please visit www.smu.edu/cul/degolyer or call (214) 768-3231.

About Fondren Exhibits

The Fondren Exhibits Committee is charged with providing educational exhibits for the SMU community that showcase special events, academic areas and individuals associated with the SMU campus.

Exhibit: SMU’s Believe it or not!

header

SMU’s Believe It Or Not!

The bizarre. The strange. THE UNUSUAL.

About the exhibit: June 25 – September 10, 2012
Fondren Library Center Lobby

All right here from the SMU Libraries. Spanning multiple collections (including the Carter Taylor Collection, Heritage Hall Collection, Mary McCord/Edyth Renshaw Collection on the Performing Arts, and the U.S. West: Photographs, Manuscripts, and Imprints Collection) these items are among the many oddities held by the various libraries here on campus.

Mark Twain Game

twain01Mark Twain’s Memory-Builder. A Game for Acquiring and Retaining All Sorts of Facts and Dates. Folio game board with 2 sheets, 13 1/16 x 8 5/8″, each pasted over black cloth to one side of a box-like wooden frame. Hartford:, February, 1891.

WITH: Facts for Mark Twain’s Memory Builder. [cover-title]. 12mo, pp. 11, [1], self wrapper. New York: Charles L. Webster & Co., 1891.

WITH: Box 5 1/8 x 1 11/16 x 7/16″, with printed label on lid, designed for storing the common pins used in playing the game, the pins still here. Fine copy of an unused example of one of Twain’s commercial failures. Those copies used by the public show irreversible pinholes, not present here. The pamphlet is “Not a literary production but a collection of twain02names, dates, etc., designed to accompany Mark Twain’s Memory-Builder,…”BAL 3432. The long explanation of “The Game” pasted on one side is dated Hartford, January, 1891, and was written by Twain. “On August 18, 1885, Mark Twain patented his Memory-Builder, a game board aimed at developing memory for dates and facts…The game and instructions…were written by Twain…Several models were test marketed in 1891 but failed to capture the public’s fancy, possibly because Twin’s instructions were too complicated. According to one critic, “The game looked like a cross between an income tax form and a table of logarithms.”- www.twainquotes.com. Twain wrote his friend William Dean Howells “If you haven’t ever tried to invent an indoor historical game, don’t.” Despite its shortcomings as a game, it still seems to generate enthusiasm to this day, witness Hillary Busis, Bored? Check Out Mark Twain’s Trivia Game, in Slate, April 22, 2010, and Mark Twain and the Art of Memory, by Thomas M. Walsh and Thomas D. Zlatic, in American Literature (Duke University Press), vol. 53, #2, May 1981. Unused copies, i.e. copies not mutilated by pin holes, are uncommon.

Builder’s Plate: Engines of Change

buildersThe Baldwin Locomotive Works of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, was the most successful builder of locomotives in the world. Sales of Baldwin steam locomotives in the United States and in foreign markets indicate the economic prowess of the company and the quality of the product.

The company was founded by Matthias W. Baldwin, a jeweler who opened a machine shop. After he built a steam engine for his shop sometime before 1830, Baldwin was commissioned by a Philadelphia museum to build a miniature locomotive to demonstrate the new steam locomotive technology first developed in England. The success of the model in 1831 brought Baldwin his first order for a full-sized locomotive from the Philadelphia, Germantown and Norristown Railroad Company, which was completed in 1832. From this modest start, the Baldwin Locomotive Works increased steadily into an economic powerhouse. Baldwin lasted for over 100 years, building the last of its approximately 70,500 locomotives in 1956.

Displayed here is a builder’s plate for Baldwin locomotive 35789, part of DeGolyer Library’s Baldwin Locomotive Collection, which consists of thousands of blueprints, specification books, photographs, and other documents. Built in 1910 for the Mexican International Railroad, Baldwin 35789 had a 2-6-6-2 wheel arrangement, that is, 2 leading wheels, followed by 6 coupled driving wheels, a second set of 6 coupled driving wheels, and 2 trailing wheels. The Mexican International was an American subsidiary of the Southern Pacific; by the time the locomotive was placed in service, the Mexican International was taken over by the Mexican government.

DeGolyer Library, Mu1995.46.2

Deck of Cards: Deal me in

cardsSmall01

Travel by passenger train in the great age of steam, especially in the wide-open spaces of the American West, was a leisurely affair. Railroads stressed service, providing dining cars, lounge cars, observation cars, and roomettes for transcontinental trips. Chicago to Los Angeles would take 3 days or more (depending on how leisurely one wanted to be), allowing plenty of time to play cards along the route of the Atchison, Topeka, and Santa Fe. Fred Harvey offered a chain of hotels and restaurants (“Harvey Houses”) associated with the Santa Fe and provided passengers with a complimentary deck of cards, illustrated with tourist scenes and romantic images of Native Americans.

cardsLong

Souvenir Playing Cards of the Great Southwest. Kansas City, Mo.: Fred Harvey, 1911.

DeGolyer Library, Ephemera Collection

Barbed Wire: Don’t Fence Me In

barbedSmall01According to the historian Walter Prescott Webb, three inventions were pivotal in the settlement of the American West: the six-shooter revolver, the windmill, and barbed wire. Barbed wire made it economically possible to build fences on the open spaces of the western prairies and plains, where wood posts and rails (traditionally used for fencing east of the Mississippi) were in short supply. As farmers enclosed their lands to protect their crops and properties in the late 19th century, cattle raisers saw the disappearance of the open range and the end of the great cattle drives, from South Texas to railheads in Kansas or grazing areas in Wyoming or Montana.

Barbed wire (or “bob wahr”), while associated with the West, was an Eastern invention. The Washburn & Moen Wire Company in Worcester, Massachusetts, was the leading manufacturer of wire products, not only in America but in the world. In addition to their Worcester factories, they operated a mill in Chicago, Illinois, which supplied much of the demand for barbed wire in the Western states.

As one can tell from the wires displayed on this panel, one of many such held at the DeGolyer, barbed wire came in various styles and gauges. According to popular lore, a wire fence should be “Horse high, bull strong, and hog tight.”

DeGolyer Library, Carter Taylor Collection, Gift of Carter Taylor, 1973

Pencils: Before the Internet, there were pencils!

pencilsPencils of one kind or another were in use by the Greeks and Romans. The graphite pencil sandwiched between two pieces of wood dates back to the 16th century. For writing, marking, and figuring (arithmetic was done by hand before the calculator), pencils were necessary pieces of equipment for everyone from school children to accountants. By 1870, Joseph Dixon of Springfield, Massachusetts, was the largest pencil manufacturer in the world. For more fascinating reading about this indispensable invention, see Henry Petroski’s The Pencil (1992).

The origins of the “advertising pencil” are unknown. DeGolyer Library, however, recently acquired by gift several dozen advertising pencils, with names and slogans of Dallas and Texas businesses painted on the sides. Some round, some hexagonal, these colorful relics of 20th-century marketing campaigns—never sharpened—bear witness to their age.

Try a pencil the next time your computer’s battery is out of power. One size fits all!

DeGolyer Library, Advertising Pencil Collection, Gift of Toni Wirth, 2012.

See more

Everette Lee DeGolyer: The Man, The Legend, The Library – Exhibit

DGbanner-for-web

Everette Lee DeGolyer: The Man, The Legend, The Library

About the exhibit: April 27 – June 25, 2012

The Man

deGolyerBackgroundEverette Lee DeGolyer, Sr., known as “De” or “Mr. De” to family, friends, and associates, attributed much of his success to pure luck. Nuggets of wisdom and wit and great stories are sprinkled throughout his extensive correspondence with others that give an insight to his personality. Biographer Lon Tinkle wrote of Mr. De’s “original and likable character…his ebullience, his sparkling if sardonic wit, his lightninglike [sic] responsiveness to the most diverse fields of intellectual interest…” and suggested that “it was this zest for living, this gusto, which won him the enduring friendship of the most diverse kinds of men, from the famous to the obscure.” Longtime “DeGolyerphile” Herb Robertson pored over the DeGolyer family papers and wrote about “the interesting, colorful, humorous, versatile, dynamic, and human Everette and the strong-willed, talented, cultured, practical and realistic homemaker, Nell” in his book The ABCs of De.

The Legend

Everette Lee DeGolyer, Sr. was a legendary pioneer in the field of petroleum geology and applied geophysics and is often referred to as the “father of American geophysics.” Striking oil at the age of twenty-four, he excelled in science and business, forming several successful corporations and serving on the board of directors of many more. He received seven honorary doctorate degrees, belonged to numerous professional societies, and earned countless awards and medals from many distinguished organizations and associations.

Making a fortune, by applying science to the oil industry, allowed Mr. DeGolyer to excel in his other avocations–book collecting, writing, publishing, and lecturing. His book collecting efforts led to three major collections: a collection of American and English literature, which was donated to the University of Texas; a science and technology collection, which was donated to the University of Oklahoma; and a Southwest collection, which came to SMU along with additional science and technology works from his personal library through the gift of the DeGolyer Foundation in 1974. Unlike many book collectors–he enjoyed reading the books he purchased.

The Library

In 1956, Everette Lee DeGolyer, Sr. and his wife, Nell Goodrich DeGolyer, established and endowed the DeGolyer Foundation to maintain and administer Mr. DeGolyer’s private collection of books. Although the bulk of operations moved from the DeGolyer Estate on White Rock Lake to the SMU campus in 1960, the library remained an independent charitable trust maintained by the Foundation and headed by Everett Lee DeGolyer, Jr., who aggressively expanded the collections. In 1974, the DeGolyer Foundation donated the library to SMU, along with an endowment, which has allowed the university to continue developing the DeGolyer collections. The DeGolyer Library is currently located on the second floor of Fondren Library West.

Photo Gallery: The life of Everette Lee DeGolyer

slide3_thumb slide4_thumb slide11_thumb slide12_thumb

See more


 

About Fondren Exhibits

The Fondren Exhibits Committee is charged with providing educational exhibits for the SMU community that showcase special events, academic areas and individuals associated with the SMU campus.