Science morphs into science fiction in “Angels & Demons”

Fredrick Olness

Science morphs into science fiction in “Angels & Demons”

"Antimatter" is one of the big stars in the new Ron Howard film "Angels & Demons." After seeing the movie, people may wonder how much of the science in the film is actually real.

SMU Physics Professor Fredrick Olness says the new action thriller exploits cutting-edge science to create an exciting tale of science fiction mystery and imagination. "Angels & Demons" takes key ideas that are based upon scientific fact, Olness comments, and then exaggerates the details for the purpose of storytelling — and that's the transformation from "science" to "science fiction."

2016-10-17T17:01:55-05:00 May 19, 2009|Categories: Energy & Matter, Researcher news|Tags: , , , |

Proton-smasher’s awaited flood of data creates big job for SMU researchers

cern_model.jpgAt 10 p.m. on a Saturday night in April, a handful of SMU scientists continue working at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, called by its acronym CERN, in Geneva, Switzerland. A scattering of lights illuminates the windows in several buildings along the Rue Einstein, where researchers from dozens of countries and hundreds of institutions are combining their expertise on the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) — the biggest physics experiment in history.

Ryszard Stroynowski, chair and professor of physics at SMU, points out each building in succession to a group of visitors. "By October, every light in every one of these windows will be on all night," he says.

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