Nearby massive star explosion 30 million years ago equaled brightness of 100 million suns

Student researchers

Nearby massive star explosion 30 million years ago equaled brightness of 100 million suns

A giant star that exploded 30 million years ago in a galaxy near Earth had a radius prior to going supernova that was 200 times larger than our sun, say astrophysicists at SMU. The massive explosion, Supernova 2013j, was one of the closest to Earth in recent years. Analysis of the exploding star's light curve and color spectrum found its sudden blast hurled material from it at 10,000 kilometers a second.

CNN: 2500-year-old slab reveals lost language

A team of scientists have uncovered a 2,500-year-old slab that may reveal details about the ancient Etruscan civilization. For more information To book a live or taped interview with Gregory Warden, call SMU News, 214-768-7654, or email news@smu.edu. Related links Gregory Warden Poggio Colla Field School Warden at SMU Etruscan exhibit at SMU's Meadows Museum [...]

TECH Insider: Archaeologists just discovered sacred text in mysterious language on a 2,500-year-old stone

Video journalist Grace Raver at TECH Insider covered SMU-sponsored research at Italy's Poggio Colla site where archaeologists have found what may be rare sacred text in the lost language of the Etruscans. The text is inscribed on a large 6th century BC sandstone slab and could reveal name of the god or goddess that was worshipped at the site.

Discovery News: Etruscan Inscription Offers Rare Clue to Mysterious People

inscriptions.jpg__800x600_q85_cropScience reporter Rossella Lorenzi Fox News segment "Digging History" covered SMU sponsored research at Italy's Poggio Colla site where archaeologists have found what may be rare sacred text in the lost language of the Etruscans. The text is inscribed on a large 6th century BC sandstone slab and could reveal name of the god or goddess that was worshipped at the site.

Fox News: 2,500-year old slab unearthed, offers glimpse into the ancient Etruscan world

inscriptions.jpg__800x600_q85_cropThe Fox News segment "Digging History" covered SMU sponsored research at Italy's Poggio Colla site where archaeologists have found what may be rare sacred text in the lost language of the Etruscans. The text is inscribed on a large 6th century BC sandstone slab and could reveal name of the god or goddess that was worshipped at the site.

Smithsonian: 2,500-Year-Old Monument Could Help Crack the Mysterious Etruscan Language

inscriptions.jpg__800x600_q85_cropScience reporter Jason Daley with Smithsonian covered SMU sponsored research at Italy's Poggio Colla site where archaeologists have found what may be rare sacred text in the lost language of the Etruscans. The text is inscribed on a large 6th century BC sandstone slab and could reveal name of the god or goddess that was worshipped at the site.

Il Tirreno: Trovata stele etrusca in Mugello: “scoperta straordinaria”

1459331426_Stele-in-situ-1-600x335Italian newspaper Il Tirreno in Italy covered SMU sponsored research at Italy's Poggio Colla site where archaeologists have found what may be rare sacred text in the lost language of the Etruscans. The text is inscribed on a large 6th century BC sandstone slab and could reveal name of the god or goddess that was worshipped at the site.

Wired.it: Una stele per svelare il linguaggio degli Etruschi

1459331426_Stele-in-situ-1-600x335Italian science reporter Anna Lisa Bonfranceschi with Wired in Italy covered SMU sponsored research at Italy's Poggio Colla site where archaeologists have found what may be rare sacred text in the lost language of the Etruscans. The text is inscribed on a large 6th century BC sandstone slab and could reveal name of the god or goddess that was worshipped at the site.

SMU Research Day 2016: Students present their research to the SMU and Dallas community

SMU graduate and undergraduate students presented their research to the SMU community at the University's Research Day 2016 on Feb. 10. Sponsored by the Office of Research and Graduate Studies, the research spanned more than 20 different fields from schools across campus.

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