Research: Women hit harder by the pressures of elite academic science

Culture, Society & Family

Research: Women hit harder by the pressures of elite academic science

Work life in academia might sound like a dream: summers off, year-long sabbaticals, the opportunity to switch between classroom teaching and research. Yet, when it comes to the sciences, life at the top U.S. research universities is hardly idyllic. Based on surveys of over 2,000 junior and senior scientists, both male and female, as well as in-depth interviews, the new book "Failing Families, Failing Science" by SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln and Rice University sociologist Elaine Howard Ecklund examines how the rigors of a career in academic science makes it especially difficult to balance family and work.

Times Higher Education: How work and family life conflict in the modern university

Academic science still operates on assumptions that have failed to catch up with the realities of today’s family lives, argue scholars Times Higher Education covered the new book of SMU sociologist Anne Lincoln in a Sept. 29 article "How work and family life conflict in the modern university." The book, Failing Families, Failing Science (NYU Press, [...]

NPR: How Domestic Violence In One Home Affects Every Child In A Class

bear-vs-girl1_slide-eec6137db10039983a91f4997472ca67ed44e0c6-s800-c85NPR journalist Gabrielle Emanuel covered the research of SMU government policy expert Elira Kuka for All Things Considered on NPR as part of its series "The Mental Health Crisis In Our Schools." The segment examined the impact on an entire school classroom when one student is victimized by domestic violence at home. Kuka, an assistant professor in the Department of Economics, and her colleagues found that new data shows violence in the home hinders the academic performance not only of the student who is abused, but also of their classmates, too.

Science.mic: Usain Bolt’s Winning Race at the Rio Olympics, Explained by Science

Journalist Kelly Dickerson referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog Science.Mic examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Dickerson quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "Usain Bolt's Winning Race at the Rio Olympics, Explained by Science" published Aug. 15, 2016.

The Globe and Mail: In perfect asymmetry

Journalist Rachel Brady referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog The Roar examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Porter quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "In perfect asymmetry" published Aug. 18, 2016.

The Roar: Humans can’t bolt much faster than Usain — What science says about the 100m world record

Sports writer Matt Porter referenced the research of SMU biomechanics expert Peter Weyand for an article in the news blog The Roar examining the potential for humans to continue improving strength and speed beyond what has already been achieved. Porter quotes Weyand for his expertise on the mechanics of running and speed of world-class sprinters like Usain Bolt. The article "Humans can't bolt much faster than Usain: What science says about the 100m world record" published Aug. 15, 2016.

Discovery News: Etruscan Inscription Reveals Name of Goddess

Science news site Discovery News covered a new discovery from the SMU-sponsored dig at Poggio Colla, a key settlement in Italy for the ancient Etruscan civilization. Archaeologists previously found a 2500-year-old slab in the foundation of a monumental temple at the dig, and have determined now that sacred text on the stele, as it's called, mentions the name "Uni," an Etruscan fertility goddess.

Daily Mail: Did the Etruscans follow a fertility cult? Inscribed stone slab reveals mysteries of ancient Italian civilisation

Science reporter Richard Gray covered a new discovery from the SMU-sponsored dig at Poggio Colla, a key settlement in Italy for the ancient Etruscan civilization. Archaeologists previously found a 2500-year-old slab in the foundation of a monumental temple at the dig, and have determined now that sacred text on the stele, as it's called, mentions the name "Uni," an Etruscan fertility goddess. The article, "Did the Etruscans follow a fertility cult? Inscribed stone slab reveals mysteries of ancient Italian civilisation," published in the Daily Mail Online Aug. 25.

Live Science: Goddess’s Name Inscribed in Lost Language on Ancient Tablet

Science reporter Stephanie Pappas covered a new discovery from the SMU-sponsored dig at Poggio Colla, a key settlement in Italy for the ancient Etruscan civilization. Archaeologists previously found a 2500-year-old slab in the foundation of a monumental temple at the dig, and have determined now that sacred text on the stele, as it's called, mentions the name "Uni," an Etruscan fertility goddess. The article, "Goddess's Name Inscribed in Lost Language on Ancient Tablet," published Aug. 26.

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