SMU Libraries Digital Collections Update: April 2020

In April 2020, SMU Libraries uploaded 183 items into SMU Libraries Digital Collections. Highlights include:

Baptism Service on our old home place, […] Van Zandt Co., Texas, ca. 1940s -1950s, DeGolyer Library, SMU.

27 photographs and pamphlets, 1899-1945, relating to Texas history. This project was made possible by a grant from the U.S. Institute of Museum and Library Services and Texas State Library and Archives Commission (Grant Number TXT-20008). (2020). Among these items are images taken from Van Zandt to San Antonio, as well as cookbooks from groups in Wharton and Waxahachie and a publication by the Breckenridge Women’s Group. One example is a photograph of a group at an outdoor baptism service in Van Zandt.

47 images, 1906-1957, from the David Goodyear Collection of Foreign Railroad Photographs. Among these images are photographs of locomotives for various Mexican railways, as well as train yards in Mexico, France, and China. Of particular note is a photograph of a train on a bridge in France; this train was the first to make the run between Cherbourg and Paris after France’s liberation in World War II.

90 engine drawing cards, 1908-1937, from the the Baldwin Locomotive Works Builder’s Cards collection. Per the collection finding aid, “In 1910, Baldwin began keeping engine drawing data on large cards. Records of locomotives after 1903 were transferred to the cards and continued from that point. The cards are arranged by BLW class numbers and include primarily dimensions of various parts of the locomotive.” Of note is a humorous card featuring design specs for “Self-Repairing Loco[motive]s,” with a small sketch of an elephant pulling a cart of bricks.

19 course catalogs from academic year 2014-2015 from the Southern Methodist University Course Catalogs collection. These catalogs contain general information and course descriptions from each of SMU’s programs of study.

 

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