Privacy Is Dead, Now Where’s My Inheritance

Originally featured in OIT’s Spring 2018 Security Report

Privacy is Dead

PrivacyIt’s probably not the first time you’ve heard this.  A private investigator, Sam Rambam was quoted as saying “Privacy is Dead – Get Over it” in 2006.  In 2012, Huffing Post contributor Miles Feldman posed the question “Is Privacy Dead?”  If it is, then our inheritance may have been in probate for years without us knowing it. The most recent major violation of privacy comes through a Facebook developer, Cambridge Analytica (discussed later in this newsletter), who collected data on millions of Americans without their consent to help political strategists win the 2016 US Presidential Election.  But most likely this is only the tip of the iceberg. Continue reading Privacy Is Dead, Now Where’s My Inheritance

Protecting Campus from Malware with Machine Learning

CylanceCylancePROTECT was introduced to the SMU campus in 2016 as a way to further secure SMU systems against viruses and malware. As the University became regularly inundated with malicious files, employees could not be expected to keep up with the volume and complexity of these new threats. As the threats evolved, so did our method of protection – machine learning. Continue reading Protecting Campus from Malware with Machine Learning

Tech Tip: Using SMU’s Password Reset Tool

To ensure security of SMU’s data holdings, SMU account passwords must be changed every 180 days. For years, we have offered the online password reset tool at pwreset.smu.edu to make password changes easier while also assisting with lost passwords.

There have been a few changes to the reset tool in recent months, so we have updated our introductory video to show you how easy it can be to manage your account password in one place.

Phishing Alert: Protect Yourself!

In the past two days, two widespread phishing e-mails have been arriving in mailboxes across campus. Make sure to protect yourself and your data and NEVER open any links or attachments in these emails! Below are examples of the reported phishing messages:Phishing Attempt Example 1

Phishing Message Example 2

 

If you received either of these messages, delete them immediately! If you clicked on any of the links or attachments within the messages, reset your password immediately and call the IT Help Desk at 214-768-4357.

Do You Know How to Spot A Phish?

AnitPhish (Anti-Phishing Campaign)Phishing is a method of identity theft which requests confidential information such as usernames, account numbers, passwords, etc. by masquerading as a legitimate, trusted company.  This term typically refers to attempts through email.  However, this same type of attack can occur in person (social engineering) or over the phone (farming).

Phishing emails have become very sophisticated.  It used to be that they were so poorly written that you could just rely on really bad grammar or spelling errors to determine their legitimacy.  That is no longer the case.  The emails can appear to come from trusted addresses and cleverly designed with graphics, disclaimers, etc.  So how can you determine if an email is legitimate?

Continue reading Do You Know How to Spot A Phish?

OIT’s latest Security Report is now available.

OIT Security Report Cover

Our first edition of the newly revised OIT Security Report is now available to the SMU community. We have revamped the layout and content to allow us to go more in-depth on specific issues and provide more detailed metrics in an easy to read format. We hope you enjoy it.To access the report, click the link below.

View Report

Authenticating to Box@SMU is required before viewing or downloading the report. This report is confidential and not intended for distribution outside the University.

End of support for QuickTime for Windows

QuickTime for WindowsRecently it was announced that Apple will no longer offer patches and will end support for QuickTime for Windows, their multimedia software package for the Microsoft OS. This move came about shortly after several vulnerabilities were detected in the software. For over five years, Windows has supported popular media formats, such as H.264 and AAC, that were enabled by the installation of Quicktime. Also, all Windows web browsers support online video without the need for plug-ins like QuickTime. Due to these new vulnerabilities, the lack of need for QuickTime for video, and the fact that Apple will not patch the software, OIT is moving to disable QuickTime for Windows on all SMU managed Windows computers starting on June 14th.

For those using video software that requires QuickTime being installed on Windows to enable video codecs, most notably Apple ProRes, this move might affect your workflow. Adobe has been working to remove the dependency on QuickTime for the past couple of years, and their software will now run without the need for QuickTime for Windows. The Abobe Creative Cloud Team had been working to support the missing codecs and only last month was able to announce the support for the native reading of ProRes. The fixes will soon be included in updates to the relevant Creative Cloud software. More information will be on the Creative Cloud blog as it becomes available.

If you need to remove QuickTime for Windows from your home computer, follow the instructions for uninstalling QuickTime 7 for Windows on the Apple support site.

For more information, please see below:

Note: This move will not affect Macintosh OS computers, only Windows OS computers.