Discover New Features in Microsoft Word (Part 2)

word_primary-100025314-largeBy Rachel Mulry

In Part 1 of this article, we discussed Quick Parts, creating your own templates, and the Screenshot tool. Today we’ll continue with two powerful Word features.

  1. Navigation view:  2014-01-21_8-37-08If you use the styles in Word, not only can you create a consistent polished document, but you can also use the Navigation view to help rearrange and jump to various portions of the file quickly.  You can enable navigation view from the View menu, or you can simply click on the page number in the bottom left corner of the screen.  There are three options in the navigation panel.  Viewing by headings allows you to view the overall structure of your document but also allows you to reorder the sections in a document simply by dragging and dropping!  The page view displays a thumbnail image of each page in the document. You can jump to the desired page by clicking the thumbnail.  The results view allows you to search for words, images etc in your document and then navigate to each instance where that search term was detected.  To turn off the navigation view, just click on the page number on the bottom left and you’re back to full screen view of your document.
  2. additionalAvailable actions properties: I admit I stumbled across this nifty feature while I was writing this article!
    By default, the available actions menu is turned off.  However, once it is enabled it will allow you to right click on certain types of data and select from additional options.  For example, you could right click on a data and create a calendar appointment! Or right click on an email address and add it to your Outlook contacts. To enable this feature, click File—Options—Proofing— AutoCorrect.  Click the Actions tab.  Then check “enable additional actions in the right-click menu”.  Select the types of data that you wish to enable these actions. Click OK.  When you are viewing or creating a document, simply right click on the text and a new “additional actions” field will appear.

These are just a few of the many powerful features in Word.  There are so many others waiting to be discovered!  So be adventurous!  Click through those menus on the ribbon or view a few new tutorials to discover something new in Word today!

Discover New Features in Microsoft Word (Part 1)

word_primary-100025314-largeAlthough I use Word on a daily basis, every now and then I uncover a feature or shortcut I didn’t know existed.  With literally thousands of different features, it’s no surprise that the application offers more than you or I typically use!  The following are five powerful features that are easily overlooked.

  1. Quick Parts: Each of us have different blocks of text tquickparthat we use in multiple documents.  For example, if you often arrange meetings or events on campus, you may include a map, driving directions and parking instructions in each event packet.  You may reuse your contact/signature block in documents or a specific logo frequently.  All of these types of data can be stored in your quick parts gallery!  Simply highlight the text—then select InsertQuick PartsSave selection to quick part gallery.  Once you’ve named and saved that component, it will be available from the Insert- Quick Parts menu in any document you create from that same machine!
  2. Create your own template: If you use a certain format or style for specific documents, consider saving that document as a template.  I know many people simply open the existing file, save as a different file name, and then delete the information to reuse the same “style”.  You can make this even easier!  Create the framework of the document as you normally would. Select your fonts, headers, footers, and anything else that should be consistent.  Then click File—Save As.  Save the document as a Word Template.  When you’re ready to use that template, click New—Select the Personal templates and select your saved template!  There are also a ton of online templates available for use which can save you a lot of trouble in creating various types of files.
  3. CaptureScreenshot Tool:  Microsoft has made it so easy now to integrate screenshots or clippings in your document.  Click on Insert—Screenshot and you’ll see the available windows in the gallery.  Simply click on the image and it will automatically be inserted into your document.  From there, you can crop, recolor etc using all of the Microsoft Word picture tools.  If you don’t want the entire window copied but only a small portion, choose the screen clipping tool and simply highlight the area you wish to copy.

To Be Continued…

Never Miss an Email Again!

Email-client-applicationBy Laurene Klassen

No matter how many times I organize my inbox I somehow manage to get to the point of needing to reorganize it.  In many of my trainings, I’m often asked for tips on how to make sure one doesn’t miss an email from key individuals or contain keywords.  Here’s a tip I’ve found handy.

If you are like me, there are probably certain emails that you receive that rank in priority for replies. Maybe it’s from your professor, supervisor, or about a critical project.  In any case, I recommend setting alerts on emails that are sent from key partners or contain keywords.  You can customize your alert to notify you by playing a specific sound, marking your email with high importance, or even displaying the email in an alert window.  So, no matter how many emails you get you’ll be sure to not to miss the critical ones!

email alert

For instructions on how to set alerts, and a number of other tips to keep your inbox from spiraling out of control, see our Outlook Productivity handouts for PC and Mac.  (By the way, these instructions are written for Outlook 2010 and 2011. However, the steps for setting alerts haven’t changed for Outlook 2013.)

Pivot Tables in Excel 2013

By: Rajat Shetty

Excel Pivot tables help summarize your data. They also allow you to avoid using complex formulas like Vlookup, SumIF, etc. to create a table. It can take a little while for a newbie to get the hang of Pivot tables. However, the 2013 Excel updates make creating Pivot tables even simpler.

A few years back, we had to follow these steps to create a simple pivot table:

  1. Select the data range
  2. Insert pivot table from the Insert tab
  3. Go to the new worksheet to check if all the fields are appearing or notchart1

4. Manually drag and drop the required fields according to our requirements to calculate-Sum, average, percentage, etc.chart2

chart3

With the new Microsoft Excel-2013, you are just one click away from creating a basic pivot table. The best part is you do not have to drag and drop anything into the field list. As seen to the right, you can pull the exact information you need from a complex spreadsheet without having to go through the above mentioned steps for Excel-2010.

How do you create Pivot tables in 2013?

Instead of inserting a Pivot table from the Insert tab, just click on the “Recommended Pivot Tables” option on the Insert tab.

chart4As you can see in the above image, Excel automatically suggests three or four options for your data range. All you have to do is make sure that your cursor is in one of the data entries on the main sheet before you click on “Recommended Pivot Tables”.

When you select one of the recommended Pivot tables, it automatically adjusts the fields without the user having to drag and drop in the Pivot table field list. Once the Pivot table is created you can customize the fields according to your requirements.

chart5

In summary, we use the following steps to create a Pivot table using Excel-2013:

1. Organize and arrange data in columns
2. Make sure each column has a heading
3. Click on Insert and select the “Recommended Pivot Charts” option
4. Choose the desired Pivot table
5. Sit back and relax

Here’s looking forward to future updates from Microsoft Office. Maybe next time Excel will be even more intuitive.