Hunt Institute student-worker, Manuela Murillo, proudly represented her Hispanic community at the 2nd annual Goldman Sachs Hispanic Leadership Summit last semester. The two-day networking and skill-building event attracted more than 1,000 applicants from across the country, but the opportunity was extended to only 50 young scholars.

At the Leadership Summit, Murillo was able to hear from industry leaders while networking with other ambitious undergrads. Through her workshops and seminars, Murillo developed important leadership skills and strong relationships with employees at Goldman Sachs.

“Maybe I’m not going to immediately work there after graduation, but I’ll know people there,” Murillo said regarding her experience.

View of New York City from the Goldman<br /> Sachs Hispanic Leadership Summit. Photo by Manuela Murillo.

View of New York City from the Goldman Sachs Hispanic Leadership Summit. Photo by Manuela Murillo.

Colombian-born Murillo was first made aware of the summit when a member of the Lyle Board of Trustees mentioned the opportunity. Murillo’s passion for making strong connections motivated her to apply for the event, although she was initially hesitant due to her lack of a financial background.

“I just applied,” Murillo admitted. “I’m not a finance major and I’ve never built a financial model before.”

Upon applying, however, she learned that 48% of the people Goldman Sachs hires are STEM majors while only 30% are business majors.

“Study engineering and you can do anything!” Murillo exclaimed.

Students mingling at the Goldman Sachs Hispanic Leadership Summit. Video by Manuela Murillo.

As a junior at SMU, Murillo is pursuing degrees in Mechanical Engineering and Mathematics. Her dedication to promoting STEM practices and education inspired Murillo to become President of the Society of Hispanic Professional Engineers (SHPE), a community service program involving mentorship, STEM workshops, and math tutoring for students in underprivileged areas of Dallas.

“We really preach professional, leadership, and personal development,” Murillo stated. “We like to fill those gaps where, yes you are going to your engineering classes, but that is not enough.”

With several internships under her belt at companies like BMW and AT&T, Murillo has leaped into the professional world determined to enhance her professional experience and enact positive change in the world.

Murillo now works as a Student Project Manager at the Hunt Institute for Engineering & Humanity helping to develop and scale different transformational initiatives. Murillo’s leadership skills and passion for bettering the world through STEM initiatives have made her a vital team member at the Hunt Institute.