Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum

Pulitzer-winning historian Robert Caro delivers Tate Lecture Oct. 29

Award-winning historian and author Robert A. Caro is at SMU Tuesday, Oct. 29 for the 2013-14 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give The Anita and Truman Arnold Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Caro is a two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning historian for his biographies of Robert Moses and Lyndon Johnson. His piece on Moses, The Power Broker, was his first book and received praise from many organizations and publications – notably TIME Magazine, which called it “one of the hundred top nonfiction books of all time.” His biography of Lyndon Johnson is split into four volumes, the most recent installment of which is The Passage of Power.

Follow Robert A. Caro on Twitter 

Image via SMU Tate

Robert A. Caro (Image via SMU Tate)

In a recent interview with The Dallas Morning News, Caro explained that there are numerous books focusing on the assassination of Kennedy but none look at Johnson’s perspective. The United States lost a president on that day but it also created one; Caro focuses on this angle in his books.

“In The Passage of Power, I wanted to look at that day from Johnson’s point of view,” Caro says. “There was something magnificent in the way he took over. There are about 11 weeks between when a president is elected and when he takes office. Johnson had only two hours and six minutes.”

Read the full interview at DallasNews.com

In 2010, Caro received the National Humanities Medal from President Barack Obama. “Caro has a unique place among American political biographers,” The Boston Globe said. “He has become, in many ways, the standard by which his fellows are measured.” A great deal of research goes into his books, including a move from New York to D.C. to live where Johnson grew up; this in-depth work has landed him more than 40 awards and honors throughout his lifetime.

Image via Robet Caro

Four volume biography of Lyndon Johnson (Image via Robet Caro website)

Caro was born and raised in New York City and attended Princeton for his undergraduate studies in English. He went on to become a Nieman Fellow at Harvard University and was once an investigative reporter for Newsday.

Tuesday’s lecture takes place less than a month before the 50th anniversary of President Kennedy’s death, and Caro will speak on the assassination and the events following as Johnson took over the presidency. The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available; meet in the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m.

Caro will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 29 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place.

To ask Caro a question via Twitter, send a tweet to @SMUtate with @RobertACaro and the hashtag #SMUtate.

Visit the SMU Tate Distinguished Lecture Series homepage at smu.edu/tateseries

New Tate Lecture season begins Sept. 17, 2013

Robert Gates and Leon Panetta, former U.S. Secretaries of Defense and directors of the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), will visit SMU Tuesday, Sept. 17 to kick off the 2013-14 season of the Willis M. Tate Distinguished Lecture Series.

Panetta and Gates will offer their insights and opinions on current events as moderated by political analyst and Tate Series veteran David Gergen. Gates, Panetta and Gergen will open the season with The Linda and Mitch Hart Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Robert M. Gates

Robert M. Gates was recruited to the CIA from the military in 1966 and spent nearly 27 years there. He served as CIA Director from 1991-93, becoming the only career officer in the agency’s history to rise from entry-level employee to director. He was awarded the Distinguished Intelligence Medal three times, the CIA’s highest award. After the CIA Gates was president of Texas A&M University, a post he left to become the 22nd U.S. Secretary of Defense from 2006-11. He is the only Secretary of Defense in U.S. history to be asked to remain in that office by a newly elected president. At the end of his service, President Barack Obama awarded Gates the Presidential Medal of Freedom, America’s highest civilian honor.

Gates also wrote a memoir, From the Shadows: The Ultimate Insider’s Story of Five Presidents and How They Won the Cold WarHe received a bachelor’s degree from College of William and Mary, a master’s in history from Indiana University and a doctorate in Russian and Soviet history from Georgetown University. Currently, he serves on the board of directors of Starbucks and as a partner at RHG LLP.

Leon Panetta

Leon Panetta has been involved in public service for most of his life. As an Army intelligence officer, he received an Army Commendation Medal, served in the U.S. House of Representatives, and served as chief of staff to President Bill Clinton. He continues this commitment as co-director of the Leon & Sylvia Panetta Institute for Public Policy at California State University-Monterey Bay, a nonprofit that seeks to instill the values of public service in young men and women.

As director of the CIA from 2009-11, Panetta oversaw the operation that resulted in bringing Osama bin Laden to justice. Following the CIA, Panetta succeeded Gates as the 23rd U.S. Secretary of Defense, serving from 2011-2013. During this time he oversaw the final removal of American troops from Iraq and the beginning of troop withdrawals from Afghanistan. He received his bachelor’s and law degrees from Santa Clara University.

David Gergen

David Gergen is a senior political analyst for CNN and director of the Center for Public Leadership at Harvard’s John F. Kennedy School of Government, where he is also a professor of public service. Gergen joined the Nixon White House in 1971 as a staff as assistant to a speech writing team and went on to presidential adviser for four former presidents. In addition to his political work he was an officer in the U.S. Navy, worked at U.S. News & World Report and appeared on the MacNeil/Lehrer NewsHour. Gergen graduated with honors from both Yale College and Harvard Law School.

> Follow Gergen on Twitter @David_Gergen

All SMU community members are invited to the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m., and seats may be reserved online. Please tweet your questions for the forum to #SMUtate.

The evening lecture is sold out. However, students can go to the basement of McFarlin Auditorium at 7 p.m. with their SMU IDs for possible seating on a first-come, first-served basis.

Learn more about this season’s Tate lecturers and the Tate Student Forum series for the community at smu.edu/tateseries. Don’t forget to follow along with everything Tate on Twitter: @SMUtate and Instagram: @smutate.

All images via SMU Tate 

Former Colombia president Álvaro Uribe delivers Tate Lecture May 7

Uribe

The 58th President of Colombia,  Álvaro Uribe, visits SMU Tuesday, May 7 for the last lecture of the 2012-13 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Willis M. Tate Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. The 2013-14 Tate Lecture season will be announced at the beginning of this event.

Uribe had a history of public service and politics before serving as President of Colombia (2002-10). He got his start in 1976 as head of the Real Estate Office of the Public Works Department of Medellín, the following year he was Secretary General of  the Labor Ministry and from 1980-82 he was head of the Civil Aviation Department. Uribe served his final positions in Medellín as mayor in 1982 and city councilman from 1984-1986.

Uribe was elected Governor of the department of Antioquia for 1995-97 and was elected Senator for 1986-1990 and 1990-94. His work in Antioquia focused on schooling opportunities for students and healthcare for the poor; he received the Star Senator, Senator with the Best Programs and Best Senator awards.

> Follow Álvaro Uribe on Twitter @AlvaroUrbieVel

Campaignuribevelez

Photo from Uribe’s campaign, “firm hand, big heart” (c/o)

Uribe was elected President of Colombia in 2002 and was re-elected in 2006; he was the first president to be consecutively re-elected in Colombia in over a century. He is recognized for transforming the “failed state”; while he was in office homicides and kindnappings were dramatically reduced. In 2009, George W. Bush awarded President Uribe a Presidential Medal of Freedom “for his work to improve the lives of (his) citizens and for (his) efforts to promote democracy, human rights and peace abroad.”

In fall 2010, after the end of Uribe’s presidency, he came to the United States and spent a year at Georgetown University. He was the Distinguished Scholar in the Practice of Global Leadership at Georgetown’s School of Foreign Service. During this year he taught students in different disciplines and conducted seminars. In 2012 News Corporation welcomed Uribe to the Board of Directors.

Uribe received his degree in law from Universidad de Antioquia and his post-graduate degree from Harvard University in Management and Administration. He currently lives in Colombia with his wife and two sons.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU faculty, staff and students may attend for free (with ID) if seats become available. It is recommended to get to McFarlin at 7 p.m., seats are filled on a first come first served basis.

Uribe will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, May 7 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Uribe a question via Twitter, send a tweet to @SMUtate with @AlvaroUrbieVel and the hashtag #SMUtate.

Visit the SMU Tate Distinguished Lecture Series homepage at smu.edu/tateseries

Economic historian Niall Ferguson delivers Tate Lecture March 19

Historian, writer, broadcaster and professor Niall Ferguson is at SMU Tuesday, March 19 for the 2012-13 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Omni Hotels Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Niall FergusonFerguson’s historical financial and economical knowledge has been showcased on many platforms. He has written 12 books, and several of them have won awards. His first, Paper and Iron: Hamburg Business and German Politics in the Era of Inflation 1897-1927was short-listed for the History Today Book of the Year award, and The World’s Banker: The History of the House of Rothschild received international critical acclaim and won the Wadsworth Prize for Business History.

Ferguson’s book The Ascent of Money: A Financial History of the World was made into a four-part television series and won the 2009 International Emmy Award for best documentary. The series was produced by Chimerica Media, Ferguson’s own TV production company started in 2007 with Melanie Fall and Adrian Pennink. Chimerica Media has also produced Civilization and Kissinger, a full-length documentary about former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, both of which ran on Channel 4 in the United Kingdom.

>  Follow Niall Ferguson on Twitter @nfergus

In 2004, Time Magazine named Ferguson one of the 100 most influential people in the world.  He is a weekly columnist for Newsweek, contributing editor for Bloomberg TV and adviser to the architects Foster & Partners, the hedge fund GLG Partners and merchant bank Kleinwort Benson.

Ferguson graduated with an honors degree in history from the University of Oxford and received a doctor of philosophy from Magdalen College. He currently divides his time between the United States and the United Kingdom. He is the Laurence A. Tisch Professor of History at Harvard University & William Ziegler Professor of Business Administration at Harvard Business School.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Ferguson will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. Tuesday, March 19 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Ferguson a question via Twitter, send a tweet to @SMUtate with @nfergus and the hashtag #SMUtate. Student moderator Amie Kromis will ask some of these questions during the event.

> Visit the SMU Tate Distinguished Lecture Series homepage at smu.edu/tateseries

Multi-talented M.K. Asante Jr. delivers Tate Lecture Feb. 26, 2013

Award winning author, filmmaker and professor M.K. Asante Jr. makes his debut on the Hilltop Tuesday, Feb. 26 for the 2012-13 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Jones Day/Billingsley/Miller Rich Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

The multi-talented Asante has been featured on numerous TV and radio programs and has had his essays published in periodicals such as USA Today, Huffington Post, and The New York Times. Since the age of 23 he has taught at Morgan State University in the department of English and Language Arts. He tells his students, “Don’t let school get in the way of your education.”

In 2009 Asante directed, produced and co-wrote The Black Candle. It was named best full-length documentary at the Africa World Documentary Film Festival and in 2012 made its television premiere on Starz. The film uses Kwanzaa to explore and celebrate the African-American community, culture and experience; it was co-written and narrated by Maya Angelou. His other films include, 500 Years Later and Motherland.

Before filmmaking Asante was a writer, and he has said that fundamentally a film starts with writing. He published his first book at the age of 20. His books include It’s Bigger Than Hip Hop, Beautiful. And Ugly Too, and Like Water Running Off My Back. His forthcoming book, Buck, is a memoir from his teenage years and explores how he educated himself on the streets of inner-city America.

>  Follow M.K. Asante Jr. on Twitter @mkasante

In addition to his professional roles, Asante speaks across the nation. He doesn’t speak solely at schools, though; he has given talks at prisons and other unlikely locations as part of his stated desire to educate and inspire all individuals.

Born in Zimbabwe and raised in Philadelphia, Asante earned a B.A. degree from Lafayette College and an M.F.A. from UCLA School of Film and Television.

Asante will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Asante a question via Twitter, send a tweet to @SMUtate and @mkasante with the hashtag #SMUtateAsante. Student moderator Amie Kromis will ask some of these questions during the event.

> Visit SMU’s Tate Distinguished Lecture Series homepage

(Image courtesy of M.K. Asante)

Health expert Sanjay Gupta to deliver 2012-13 Tate Lecture Nov. 27

Dr. Sanjay GuptaNeurosurgeon, public health policy expert and CNN chief medical correspondent Dr. Sanjay Gupta visits SMU Tuesday, Nov. 27 for the 2012-13 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Jones Day Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Based in Atlanta, Gupta plays an integral role in CNN’s reporting on health and medical news for shows including “Starting Point with Soledad O’Brien,” “Anderson Cooper 360°,” and network documentaries. In addition, he anchors the weekend medical affairs program “Sanjay Gupta, M.D.” Gupta also contributes to CNN.com and CNNHealth.com. He has reported from earthquake- and tsunami-ravaged Japan and provided live coverage of the unprecedented flooding in Pakistan in 2010. He earned two Emmy Awards for his reporting in Haiti after the devastating 2010 earthquake.

In 2003, Gupta embedded with the U.S. Navy’s “Devil Docs” medical unit, reporting from Iraq and Kuwait as the unit traveled to Baghdad. He provided live coverage of the first operation performed during the war, and performed life-saving brain surgery five times himself in a desert operating room. In addition, he contributed to the network’s 2010 Peabody Award-winning coverage of the oil disaster in the Gulf of Mexico – as well as its 2006 Peabody Award-winning coverage of Hurricane Katrina, where his Charity Hospital coverage for “Anderson Cooper 360°” resulted in a 2006 News & Documentary Emmy for Outstanding Feature Story. In 2004, Gupta traveled to Sri Lanka to cover the tsunami disaster that took more than 155,000 lives in Southeast Asia, contributing to CNN’s 2005 Alfred I. DuPont-Columbia Award.

Gupta’s passion for inspiring Americans to lead healthier, more active lives led him to launch “Fit Nation,” CNN’s multi-platform anti-obesity initiative. In 2011, “Fit Nation” follows the progress of Gupta and six CNN viewers as they inspire each other while training for a triathlon.

Follow Sanjay Gupta on Twitter @SanjayGuptaCNN

In addition to his work for CNN, Gupta is a member of the staff and faculty at the Emory University School of Medicine. He is associate chief of neurosurgery at Grady Memorial Hospital and regularly performs surgery at Emory University and Grady hospitals. He holds memberships in the American Association of Neurological Surgeons, Congress of Neurological Surgeons, and the Council on Foreign Relations. He is a diplomate of the American Board of Neurological Surgery, a certified medical investigator, and a board member of the LiveStrong Foundation.

Before joining CNN, Gupta completed neurosurgical fellowships at the Semmes-Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute in Memphis and at the University of Michigan Medical Center in Ann Arbor. In 1997, he was selected as a White House Fellow, serving as a special adviser to First Lady Hillary Clinton.

Gupta contributes to the CBS news magazine “60 Minutes” and “CBS Evening News with Scott Pelley.” He is the author of two best-selling books, Chasing Life (2007) and Cheating Death (2009), both of which became companion documentaries for CNN.

A native of the Detroit metropolitan area, Gupta earned his B.S. degree in biomedical sciences from the University of Michigan, where he also received an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree in 2012 for his accomplishments in the medical field. He earned his M.D. degree from the University of Michigan Medical School.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Gupta will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Gupta a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #SMUtateGupta. A moderator will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

Gaming guru Jane McGonigal delivers Tate Lecture Nov. 13, 2012

Jane McGonigalGamer, game designer, author and futurist Jane McGonigal is on the Hilltop Tuesday, Nov. 13 for SMU’s 2012-13 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. She will give the Oncor Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

McGonigal’s work emphasizes the power of games to solve problems. Named by The New York Times as one of 10 scientists with the best vision for what is coming next, and by Oprah Winfrey as one of the 20 most inspiring women in the world, she is an expert in harnessing the power of digital games to help solve some of the biggest challenges facing the world today and in the future.

In her New York Times best-selling book Reality is Broken: Why Games Make Us Better and How They Can Change the World, McGonigal makes the case that the gamer spirit — an attitude of fun, dedicated, collective problem-solving — is our greatest asset as we face the social, economic and environmental problems of the 21st century. She argues that game designers are “happiness engineers” who are experts in making difficult tasks engaging.

Follow Jane McGonigal on Twitter @AvantGame

As a world-renowned designer of alternate-reality games (ARGs), McGonigal specializes in reimagining the world as a place where every challenge is a quest — where the harder a task is, the more people want to do it. An ARG activity can be as mundane as household chores or as urgent as surviving peak oil or establishing local sustainable businesses (the subjects of two of her own games). But more than just reframing these challenges, McGonigal works to capture the kind of heroism, epic purpose and communal striving that many struggle to find in their day-to-day routines.

McGonigal is the chief creative officer of SuperBetter Labs (formerly Social Chocolate) and has keynoted the Game Developers Conference, South By Southwest and Google Zeitgeist Americas. She also serves as director of game research and development with Institute for the Future, a nonprofit research group based in Palo Alto, California. Her TED 2010 speech attracted more than 1.7 million views. She also played a high-profile role at the 2012 World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland, in January.

A native of Philadelphia and a former New Yorker, McGonigal lives in San Francisco with her husband, Kiyash. She earned her B.A. degree in English from Fordham University and her Ph.D. in performance studies from the University of California-Berkeley.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. McGonigal will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask McGonigal a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #SMUtateMcGonigal. A moderator will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

Krauthammer, Moyers close 2011-12 Tate season May 1

Award-winning journalists and commentators Charles Krauthammer and Bill Moyers visit SMU May 1 for the final event of the 2011-12 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series season. They will give the Gregg and Molly Engles Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Charles KrauthammerWinner of the Pulitzer Prize and named by The Financial Times as the most influential commentator in America, Charles Krauthammer has received honors for his writing from every part of the political spectrum, including People for the American Way’s First Amendment Award and the Bradley Foundation’s Bradley Prize. Since 1985, he has written a syndicated column for The Washington Post, for which he won the 1987 Pulitzer Prize for distinguished commentary. It is published weekly in more than 240 newspapers worldwide.

Krauthammer is a contributing editor to The Weekly Standard and The New Republic, and a weekly panelist on Inside Washington. He is also a contributor to FOX News, appearing nightly on FOX’s evening program, Special Report with Bret Baier.

Follow Charles Krauthammer on Twitter @krauthammer

Bill MoyersA survey of television critics by Television Quarterly, the official journal of The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences, placed Bill Moyers among the 10 journalists who have had the most significant influence on television news. He has received more than 30 Emmy Awards for excellence and 2 prestigious Gold Baton awards, the highest honor of the Alfred I. duPont Columbia University Award. He has also won 9 Peabody Awards and 3 George Polk Awards, including the Career Achievement Award.

Before establishing Public Affairs Television in 1986, Moyers served as executive editor of Bill Moyers’ Journal on public television, senior news analyst for the CBS Evening News, and chief correspondent for the acclaimed documentary series CBS Reports. Two of his public television series, Creativity (1982) and A Walk Through the 20th Century (1984), were named Outstanding Informational Series by the Academy of Arts and Sciences. With his wife and partner, Public Affairs Television President Judith Davidson Moyers, he has produced hundreds of hours of programming for public television. Currently, he is the host of Moyers & Company.

Follow Bill Moyers on Twitter @billmoyers

Krauthammer and Moyers will answer questions from SMU community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. May 1 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask the speakers a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #TateSMU. Student moderator Derek Hubbard will ask some of these questions during the event.

The Tate Series’ 2012-13 season will be announced at the evening event, which is sold out. Watch the SMU Forum for more information after the announcement, and learn more at smu.edu/tateseries.

Walter Isaacson to give Tate Lecture at SMU March 27, 2012

Walter IsaacsonWalter Isaacson, president and CEO of the Aspen Institute and author of a best-selling biography of the late Steve Jobs, comes to SMU March 27 as part of the 2011-12 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Lacerte Family Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

As chief executive of the Aspen Institute, Isaacson leads the senior management of the nonpartisan educational and policy studies institute based in Washington, D.C. He also serves as chairman of the board of Teach for America, which recruits recent college graduates to teach in underserved communities.

Follow Walter Isaacson on Twitter @walterisaacson

Isaacson’s most recent book, Steve Jobs, was published by Simon & Schuster in October 2011, mere days after the inventor’s death from pancreatic cancer. It was named one of the “Best Books of 2011” by Amazon.com, where it also became the best-selling book of that year. In addition, it topped the New York Times nonfiction best-seller list for nine weeks and has remained on the chart continuously for 21 weeks as of the April 1, 2012 list.

Other books by Isaacson include Einstein: His Life and Universe (2007), Benjamin Franklin: An American Life (2003), and Kissinger: A Biography (1992). In addition, he was coauthor with Evan Thomas of The Wise Men: Six Friends and the World They Made (1986).

Isaacson began his career at The Sunday Times of London and then worked for The New Orleans Times-Picayune/States-Item. He joined TIME in 1978 and served as a political correspondent, national editor, and editor of new media before becoming the magazine’s 14th editor in 1996. Isaacson became chairman and CEO of CNN in 2001 and president and CEO of the Aspen Institute in 2003.

He was appointed by President Barack Obama and confirmed by the U.S. Senate to serve as the chairman of the Broadcasting Board of Governors, which oversees Voice of America, Radio Free Europe, and other international broadcasts of the United States, a position he held until 2012. For two years after Hurricane Katrina, from 2005-07, Isaacson served as vice-chair of the Louisiana Recovery Authority.

Currently, Isaacson is vice-chair of Partners for a New Beginning, a public-private group tasked with forging ties between the United States and the Muslim world. In addition, he serves on the boards of United Airlines and Tulane University, as well as the Board of Overseers of Harvard University.

A New Orleans native, Isaacson is a graduate of Harvard College and of Pembroke College of Oxford University, where he was a Rhodes Scholar. He lives with his wife and daughter in Washington, D.C.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Isaacson will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. March 27 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Isaacson a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #IsaacsonSMU. Student moderator Derek Hubbard will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

Food & culture writer Michael Pollan to give Tate Lecture March 1

Author and essayist Michael PollanMichael Pollan, author of The Omnivore’s Dilemma and other bestsellers about “the places where food and culture intersect,” visits SMU March 1 as the next speaker in the 2011-12 Tate Distinguished Lecture Series. He will give the Oncor Lecture at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

For more than 20 years, Pollan has been writing books and articles about the places where the human and natural worlds meet: food, agriculture, gardens, drugs and architecture. He wrote the bestsellers In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto and The Omnivore’s Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals, which was named one of the 10 best books of 2006 by The New York Times and The Washington Post. It also won the California Book Award and the James Beard Award for best food writing, and was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

> Follow Michael Pollan on Twitter @michaelpollan

Pollan’s previous book, The Botany of Desire: A Plant’s-Eye View of the World, was also a New York Times bestseller, received the Borders Original Voices Award for the best non-fiction work of 2001, and was recognized as one of the best books of the year by the American Booksellers Association and Amazon.com. PBS premiered a two-hour special documentary based on The Botany of Desire in fall 2009. His most recent book is Food Rules: An Eater’s Manual, which was an immediate # 1 New York Times bestseller upon publication.

A contributing writer to The New York Times Magazine since 1987, Pollan has received numerous writing awards, including the James Beard Award for best magazine series in 2003; the John Burroughs Prize for best natural history essay in 1997; the QPB New Vision Award for his first book, Second Nature (1991); the 2000 Reuters-I.U.C.N. Global Award for Environmental Journalism for his reporting on genetically modified crops; and the 2003 Humane Society of the United States’ Genesis Award for his writing on animal agriculture. His articles have appeared in Harper’s (where he served for many years as executive editor), Mother Jones, Gourmet, Vogue, Travel + Leisure, Gardens Illustrated and The Nation.

In 2010, Pollan was named to the TIME Magazine “TIME 100” in the Thinkers category. In 2009 he was named one of the top 10 “New Thought Leaders” by Newsweek magazine.

In 2003, Pollan was appointed the John S. and James L. Knight Professor of Journalism at UC-Berkeley’s Graduate School of Journalism, and the director of the Knight Program in Science and Environmental Journalism. In addition to teaching, he lectures widely on food, agriculture and gardening.

Pollan grew up on Long Island and was educated at Bennington College, Oxford University, and Columbia University, from which he received a Master’s degree in English. He lives in the Bay Area with his wife, the painter Judith Belzer, and their son, Isaac.

The evening lecture is sold out, but SMU students may attend for free with their University ID if seats become available. Pollan will answer questions from University community members and local high school students in the Turner Construction/Wells Fargo Student Forum at 4:30 p.m. March 1 in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballroom. Doors open at 4 p.m.

The Forum is free, but seating is limited. SMU faculty, staff and students are encouraged to attend; RSVP online to ensure a place. To ask Pollan a question via Twitter, send a tweet with the hashtag #PollanSMU. Student moderator Derek Hubbard will ask some of these questions during the event.

Learn more about this year’s Tate Lectures at smu.edu/tateseries

Load More Posts