Paige Ware named dean <em>ad interim</em> of SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development

Teaching and Learning

Paige Ware named dean ad interim of SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development

Paige WarePaige Ware, an award-winning scholar, teacher and researcher, has been named interim dean of SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, effective June 30, 2016.

“I am delighted that Professor Paige Ware has accepted my offer to become Dean ad interim,” said Steven C. Currall, SMU provost and vice president for academic affairs. “An extraordinarily accomplished scholar, teacher, and department chair in the Simmons School, Paige is the ideal person to leverage and continue the momentum of the School.  As I consulted widely with members of the School’s community, I repeatedly heard descriptions of the deep respect and affection that Simmons School faculty and staff have for Paige.  I am confident that she will provide inspired leadership of the School.”

Professor Ware joined the SMU faculty in 2003. As chair of the Department of Teaching and Learning in the Simmons School, she designs and teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in education research, diverse learners, literacy, educational psychology, and teacher preparation for working with English-language learners.

She served as director of the Simmons School’s Ph.D. Program in Education and Human Development from 2011-14.

“I feel honored at this opportunity to work with my colleagues, both across the University as well as with our many Simmons partners in the greater Dallas area,” Ware said. “I have deep respect for the types of initiatives that the faculty, staff and students in the Simmons School have developed in their research, teaching, service, and community partnerships. I hope to help sustain and extend this extraordinary growth as we continue to build on the support we receive from the SMU community, our alumni and our area partners.”

Ware’s research focuses on the use of multimedia technologies for fostering language and literacy growth among adolescents, as well as on the use of Internet-based communication for promoting intercultural awareness. Her work has been funded by the International Research Foundation for English Language Education (TIRF), Proyecto de Innovación Docente (Project for Innovative Teaching), the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of English Language Acquisition, and a National Academy of Education/Spencer Post-Doctoral Fellowship. She also was awarded a Ford Research Fellowship established by SMU trustee Gerald J. Ford.

“Paige Ware is the ideal educator to serve as interim dean of the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “She has demonstrated scholarly and administrative leadership that will ensure a seamless progression of achievement for the Simmons School. She has helped make the Simmons School a pioneer in evidence-based education initiatives, nationally significant research and outreach to local school districts and communities. Under her guidance, the Simmons School will continue its trajectory of outstanding achievement and impact.”

Ware received B.A. degrees in English with a linguistics emphasis and German from the University of Kentucky-Lexington in 1994. She earned her M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in education, language, literacy and culture from the University of California-Berkeley in 1999 and 2003, respectively. Fluent in German and Spanish, Ware was a Fulbright Scholar Teaching Fellow in Germany before moving to Spain, where she taught in a bilingual Spanish-English elementary program.

She is co-author of a technology standards book for Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) and has written or co-written dozens of peer-reviewed articles and book chapters. She is a frequent speaker on technology as an acquisition tool for language and culture and on writing development in adolescent learners.

Ware is an internationally recognized reviewer for peer-reviewed journals and publishers, including Language Learning & Technology, Modern Language Journal, Journal of English for Academic Purposes, the American Educational Research Journal, Journal of Literacy Research, Cambridge University Press, and SAGE Publications.

At programs sponsored by the SMU Center for Teaching Excellence, she mentors faculty colleagues and makes presentations as an Altshuler Distinguished Teaching Professor and member of the University’s Academy of Distinguished Teachers. Ware also received the Distinguished University Citizen Award for service and activities that benefit SMU’s students and academic mission. In 2013, she was chosen as keynote speaker for the all-University Honors Convocation.

Ware replaces Leon Simmons Dean David J. Chard, who will become president of Wheelock College in Boston, Massachusetts, on July 1, 2016.

April 25, 2016|For the Record, News|

Research: Learning algebra from Instagram

Stock photo of a student working a math problem on a blackboardCan students learn algebra from Instagram and video games?

SMU teaching researcher Candace Walkington thinks so. And her new study, funded by the National Academy of Education, will test the idea.

“In previous work, I found that students draw upon rich algebraic ways of reasoning when pursuing their out-of-school interests in areas like sports, social networking and video games,” says Walkington, an assistant professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning in the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. “Making connections to these topics in algebra class can improve long-term understanding of algebraic ideas.”

The new study asks pre-algebra middle school students in the Dallas Independent School District to author their own algebra stories based on their personal interests. They will describe how linear relationships approximate what they encounter in their everyday lives, such as how they accumulate followers on Instagram or score points in a video game over time, says Walkington, whose research focus is evidence-based effective teaching. About 200 pre-algebra students in eight classrooms at DISD schools are participating in the study.

Based on results from earlier research, Walkington hypothesizes that authoring the stories will elicit students’ interest in the content to be learned by drawing on their knowledge about home and community.

Algebra is a gatekeeper to many careers and to higher-level mathematics, making it critical for students to master, Walkington says – but students struggle to understand the abstract representations.

“Students often can’t see the connection between their world and algebra,” she says. “Exploring ways to connect math to their lives, experiences and knowledge is critical for making it accessible and captivating. That’s especially true when considering students from diverse backgrounds.”

A pilot version of the study begins in spring 2015. The full study starts in fall 2015.

Walkington was awarded the grant as part of the Spencer Postdoctoral Fellowship Program of the National Academy of Education. The $55,000 grant supports early career scholars working in critical areas of education research.

Written by Margaret Allen

> Read the full story at the SMU Research blog

October 24, 2014|Research, Year of the Faculty|

Ten SMU professors receive 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships

Ten SMU faculty members have received 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

The Fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the Fellowships, which support research “advancing the intellectual, social or religious life of Texas and the nation.”

Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation, and the project’s sensitivity to value questions confronting higher education and society.

The winning professors for this academic year, and their projects:

• Tim Cassedy, English, Dedman College, for research at the Library of Congress for his book Language Makes the Difference, a history of ideas about language and identity at the turn of the 19th century.

• Michael Chmielewski, Psychology, Dedman College, to study the appropriateness of commonly used psychological tests and measures for diverse populations.

• Michael Corris, Art, Meadows School of the Arts, for interviews and illustration reproductions for his book The Armchair in the Studio: The Engagement of Art and Philosophy Since the 1960s.

• Benard Cummings, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, for a theatre adaptation of Babette’s Feast set during the Civil War.

• Kate Engel, Religious Studies, Dedman College, for archival research in Great Britain and Germany on international Protestantism at the time of the American Revolution.

• Blake Hackler, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, to take part in advanced training with the SITI Theatre ensemble and conduct research on embodied actor training methodologies.

• Andrea Meltzer, Psychology, Dedman College,  for a study of newlywed couples and weight-maintenance motivations.

• Lisa Pon, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, to support reproduction of images for her upcoming book on the Madonna of the Fire.

• Candace Walkington, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, to build a website containing mathematics problems that are personalized to middle and high school students’ interests.

• Eric White, Special Collections, Bridwell Library, to complete the first comprehensive documentary history of every surviving copy of the Gutenberg Bible, encompassing their discovery, changing ownership and rise in cultural significance.

November 7, 2013|For the Record, News, Research|

SMU Honors Day 2013 is Monday, April 15

SMU celebrates the high achievements of students, faculty and staff members with two ceremonies that take place every third Monday of April. This year’s Honors Day Convocation and Awards Extravaganza take place on the afternoon and evening of Monday, April 15, 2013.

2013 Honors Day Convocation award recipients

Paige Ware, associate professor of teaching and learning in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, will deliver the address during the 16th Honors Day Convocation at 5:30 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium. The ceremony celebrates academic achievement at the University and department levels. Ware, a Ford Research Fellow, is an expert on the use of multimedia technologies for fostering language and literacy growth among adolescents, as well as on the use of internet-based communication for promoting intercultural awareness.

Retired and current faculty will assemble for Honors Day Convocation in academic dress no later than 5:10 p.m. in the Perkins Administration Building lobby and will process together to McFarlin Auditorium. A reception will immediately follow the ceremony in the Dallas Hall Quadrangle.

Watch Honors Day Convocation via live streaming April 15 on the Registrar’s website

Participating faculty members may RSVP online. Faculty members with questions regarding the procession can send an e-mail to ceremonies@smu.edu or call 214-768-3417.

Later, the University presents several awards for excellence – including its highest honor, the “M” Award – during the 2013 Awards Extravaganza at 7:30 p.m. in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Ballrooms. Awards Extravaganza honorees will be listed in SMU Forum the day after the ceremony.

Find more information on Honors Day Convocation at the Registrar’s website
Learn more about the Awards Extravaganza from SMU Student Life

April 8, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News, Save the Date|
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