Ten SMU professors receive 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships

special collections

Ten SMU professors receive 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships

Ten SMU faculty members have received 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

The Fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the Fellowships, which support research “advancing the intellectual, social or religious life of Texas and the nation.”

Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation, and the project’s sensitivity to value questions confronting higher education and society.

The winning professors for this academic year, and their projects:

• Tim Cassedy, English, Dedman College, for research at the Library of Congress for his book Language Makes the Difference, a history of ideas about language and identity at the turn of the 19th century.

• Michael Chmielewski, Psychology, Dedman College, to study the appropriateness of commonly used psychological tests and measures for diverse populations.

• Michael Corris, Art, Meadows School of the Arts, for interviews and illustration reproductions for his book The Armchair in the Studio: The Engagement of Art and Philosophy Since the 1960s.

• Benard Cummings, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, for a theatre adaptation of Babette’s Feast set during the Civil War.

• Kate Engel, Religious Studies, Dedman College, for archival research in Great Britain and Germany on international Protestantism at the time of the American Revolution.

• Blake Hackler, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, to take part in advanced training with the SITI Theatre ensemble and conduct research on embodied actor training methodologies.

• Andrea Meltzer, Psychology, Dedman College,  for a study of newlywed couples and weight-maintenance motivations.

• Lisa Pon, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, to support reproduction of images for her upcoming book on the Madonna of the Fire.

• Candace Walkington, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, to build a website containing mathematics problems that are personalized to middle and high school students’ interests.

• Eric White, Special Collections, Bridwell Library, to complete the first comprehensive documentary history of every surviving copy of the Gutenberg Bible, encompassing their discovery, changing ownership and rise in cultural significance.

November 7, 2013|For the Record, News, Research|

Calendar Highlights: Closing attractions for Commencement 2012

As Spring 2012 finals end and SMU gears up for its 97th Commencement celebration, take note of three remarkable exhibitions that end this weekend. See them before they’re gone:

A portrait of Charles Dickens wearing a tartan waistcoat, photographed by G. Herbert Watkins in 1858

• DeGolyer Library honors the 2012 bicentennial of a literary titan with Charles Dickens: The First 200 Years, featuring more than 200 items from the Stephen Weeks Collection – including all of Dickens’ major works in original editions, as well as prints, drawings, letters, later editions, piracies, translations, adaptations, and advertising ephemera. The exhibit runs through Saturday, May 12, and is free and open to the public.

DeGolyer is open 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m. Monday-Friday and will observe special Saturday hours 9 a.m.-4 p.m. May 12 for visiting SMU parents – including Stephen Weeks, whose daughter Jennifer will graduate from the University this weekend.

Image from Bridwell Library exhibit of religious books for children at SMU• Bridwell Library explores Bibles, psalms, catechisms, instructional works, moral stories, devotional literature and hymnals written and published specifically for youngsters in Four Centuries of Religious Books for Children, on display in the Bridwell’s Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries through Saturday, May 12.

The event is free and open to the public; check the Bridwell Library homepage for gallery hours. An online version will also be on display for the duration of the exhibition.

A detail from the Pastrana TapestriesMeadows Museum offers unprecedented insight into four 15th-century panels of monumental scale and skill that count among the finest surviving Gothic tapestries in existence. The Invention of Glory: Afonso V and the Pastrana Tapestries runs through Sunday, May 13.

Featured exclusively at the Meadows is the armor of Duarte de Almeida, the standard-bearer for Afonso V of Portugal, who is depicted prominently in one of the tapestries. Now housed at the Cathedral of Toledo in Spain, Duarte’s armor is the only relatively complete example of period armor that can be directly related to Portugal.

Also on display are 15th- and 16th-century maps lent by SMU’s DeGolyer Library that not only help to relate how world geography was understood around the time of the tapestries’ creations, but also to establish a context for understanding the feats of exploration led by the Portuguese well before Columbus set sail. Check the Meadows Museum homepage for visiting hours.

May 8, 2012|Calendar Highlights|

The envelope, please: SMU’s role in preserving Oscar history

1942 Oscar ceremony photoWhile Hollywood prepares to celebrate the 82nd annual Academy Awards March 7, 2010, North Texas can look to SMU to find priceless pieces of Oscar history.

SMU library collections include almost 70 years of Academy Award history, such as Greer Garson‘s 1942 Oscar for “Mrs. Miniver,” four 1951 Academy Award envelopes (complete with red seals and winners’ names), and Horton Foote‘s original screenplay and dialogue notes for his 1983 Oscar-winning screenplay, “Tender Mercies.”

“I’ll never forget that when Mr. Foote came to SMU in 2003 to receive an honorary degree, we had displayed some of the early manuscripts of his play, The Trip to Bountiful,” says Russell Martin, DeGolyer Library director.” He looked at the pages on view in the exhibit case and said, ‘I think I’ll change that. I think I can make it better.’ And so it goes: Literary manuscripts are tangible links to the writer and the creative process. When researchers study such materials at SMU, they help advance our understanding and appreciation of literary works.”

The ephemera from past Oscar ceremonies represent aspects of the physical culture of the Hollywood industry – one of the most influential facets of American society and global culture in the 20th century, says Rick Worland, professor of cinema-television in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

“Everyone knows the catch-phrase, ‘The envelope, please.’ To actually have several of the envelopes from the 1951 ceremony, literally fished out of a trash can, might seem cultish or just dumb,” Worland adds. “But being able to see ephemeral objects such as this can help bring the bit of cultural history alive for people from now on.”

(Above, Greer Garson – left center – at the 1942 Academy Awards with, left to right, Van Heflin, Teresa Wright and James Cagney.)

Read more from SMU News

March 2, 2010|News|

Exhibit of 15th-century books opens at Bridwell Library

Bridwell ancient books exhibitA new exhibition in SMU’s Bridwell Library explores the different ways in which Europeans in past centuries discovered the power and potential of Gutenberg’s invention of the printing press.

Invention and Discovery: Printed Books from Fifteenth-Century Europe will be on display through May 3, 2010 in Bridwell’s Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries. The exhibition features 60 books and broadsides printed between c. 1455 and 1500 from the library’s collection and is free and open to the public during library hours.

Early readers were not content to leave their books exactly as they came off the presses, but were inclined to engage in their contents. Employing local artisans to provide rubrication, illumination and bindings, readers added their own annotations, inscriptions and other signs of ownership and use.

As a group, the exhibited items reflect the active participation of countless individuals in the initial spread of print culture across Europe.

Read more from SMU News
Watch a slideshow of books in the exhibition slideshow
See an online version of the exhibit at the Bridwell Library website
Check the Bridwell Library’s hours of operation

February 9, 2010|Calendar Highlights, News|
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