Five SMU faculty members retire with <em>emeritus</em> status in 2013-14

Simon Sargon

Five SMU faculty members retire with emeritus status in 2013-14

Five distinguished faculty members, with nearly 200 years of combined service to SMU, retired with emeritus status during the 2013-14 academic year. Congratulations to the following professors:

• Richard V. Helgason, Professor Emeritus of Engineering Management, Information and Systems, Lyle School of Engineering (1979 to 2014)

• Joseph W. McKnight, Professor Emeritus of Law, Dedman School of Law (1955 to 2014)

• William Pulte, Professor Emeritus of Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development (1973 to 2014)

• Lawrence S. Ruben, Professor Emeritus of Biological Sciences, Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences (1986 to 2014)

Simon Sargon, Professor Emeritus of Composition, Meadows School of the Arts (1983 to 2014)

June 18, 2014|For the Record, News|

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 13, 2012

Graphic poetry: Together the Meadows Museum and Bridwell Library acquired a copy of Picasso’s Vingt Poëmes. This is one of fifteen deluxe copies of the book itself and features 20 sonnets by famed Spanish poet Luis de Góngora y Argote; complementing the sonnets are 19 full-page etched female heads. The artist’s book is available for viewing in the Meadows Museum Sept. 16, 2012  Jan. 13, 2013. This exhibit is free for students, faculty and staff.

Rock the vote: Join SMU as we celebrate the U.S. Constitution in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18. Participants will have the opportunity to win prizes for their Constitution knowledge as well as register to vote for the 2012 Presidential election Nov. 6. Don’t miss this opportunity – remember, every vote counts! For more information, contact Lisa O’Donnell or 214-768-9206.

Bon voyage: If the travel bug has bitten your students, remind them to stop by the SMU Abroad Fair. SMU offers 148 study abroad programs in 50 countries. At the fair, students can find out the requirements for study abroad and hear from past abroad students about their experiences. Travel to the Owen Arts Center Lobby from 11 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19 for all the information.

Local borders: Join Anthony Mora, associate professor of history, American culture, and Latina/o studies at the University of Michigan, as he discusses the New Mexican towns Las Cruces and La Mesilla, and how they shaped Mexicans’ historic role in the United States. Las Cruces was built north of the border while La Mesilla was built south of the border, creating conflicting views of the relations of race and nation. This topic is the focus of his recent book, Border Dilemmas: Racial and National Uncertainties in New Mexico, 1848-1912. His lecture, “Local Borders: Two Towns and the Making of the U.S.-Mexico Boundary,” will be held 6-8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012,  in DeGolyer Library. and is presented by SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies. It’s free and open to the public.

Sweet symphony: The 2012-13 season of the Meadows Symphony Orchestra opens Friday, Sept. 21, with 19th- and 20th-century works. The program includes Symphony No. 1: Holocaust by Simon Sargon, Meadows professor of composition, with guest artist Kelly Markgraf, noted American baritone. Performances begin at 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21 and at 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 23 in Caruth Auditorium. Tickets are $7 for students, faculty and staff. Call 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS for more information. (Below, photo courtesy Meadows School of the Arts.)

September 13, 2012|Calendar Highlights|

Seven faculty members receive 2008-09 Sam Taylor Fellowships

Seven SMU faculty members have been awarded 2008-09 Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

The Sam Taylor Fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the Fellowships, which support research “advancing the intellectual, social, or religious life of Texas and the nation.” Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation, and the project’s sensitivity to value questions confronting higher education and society.

The winning professors and their projects:

Ben Johnson, History, Dedman College, for a book project on the American environmental reform movement at the turn of the twentieth century.

Mark Kerins, Cinema-Television, Meadows School of the Arts, for transcriptions of interview tapes with film industry professionals, relating to his book project on digital sound production in cinema.

Nia Parson, Anthropology, Dedman College, for research in Chile on domestic violence and governmental systems under a government changing from dictatorship to democracy.

Pamela Patton, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, to acquire photographs for publication in her book on visual imagery of the Christian-Jewish relationship in medieval Spain.

Lisa Pon, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, for research in Rome on the fifteenth-century print Madonna of the Fire, as exemplar of relationships among locations, icons, and collective memory.

Simon Sargon, Music, Meadows School of the Arts, to compose a large-scale orchestral and choral requiem based on early Jewish and Christian texts.

Gabriela Vokic, Foreign Languages and Literatures, Dedman College, for research in Chile on structural position of speech sounds, with Spanish speakers acquiring English as a second language.

For more information on the Fellowships, including application instructions, contact Kathleen Hugley-Cook, director of the University’s Office of National Fellowships and Awards.

November 21, 2008|News|

Calendar Highlights: April 3, 2008

Judaica Lecture: Serge Frolov, Nate and Anne Levine Endowed Chair in Jewish Studies in SMU’s Department of Religious Studies, speaks on “Pillar of Smoke: Religious Responses to the Holocaust” at 2 p.m. April 6 in Bridwell Library. For more information, call 8-3483.

Birthday song: The Meadows Wind Ensemble honors Professor Simon Sargon with a 70th-birthday concert featuring commissioned pieces written by Sargon for the Wind Ensemble – including the world premiere of a new overture. The concert takes place at 3 p.m. April 6 in Caruth Auditorium; tickets are $7 for SMU faculty, staff and students. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 8-2787 (8-ARTS).

True colors: Master of Fine Arts candidates show their work in the 2008 M.F.A. Qualifying Exhibition, April 7-19 in Pollock Gallery, Hughes-Trigg Student Center.

Perkins Public Lecture: SMU’s Perkins School of Theology presents “Xenophobia and Xenophilia: Toward a Theology of Migration,” a public lecture by Luis Rivera-Pagan, Henry White Luce Emeritus Professor of Ecumenics at Princeton Theological Seminary and visiting professor in Perkins, at 7 p.m. April 7 in Perkins Chapel. For more information, contact David Maldonado.

Sellers’ market: SMU’s vendors will meet the campus community at the 2008 SMU Purchasing Vendor Fair 11 a.m.-2 p.m. April 8 in the Hughes-Trigg Ballroom. Festivities include food, games and prizes. For more information, contact SMU Purchasing, 8-3239.

Hesburgh Lecture: John Gaffney, professor of anthropology at the University of Notre Dame, discusses “Lost in Translation? Bringing American Ideals to the Middle East” at 7 p.m. April 8 in Room 131, Dedman Life Sciences Building. Cosponsored by SMU’s Department of Anthropology and Human Rights Education Program, with the Notre Dame Club of Dallas. For more information, contact Van Kemper.

Brand excitement: Veteran ad man and SMU alumnus Hal Curtis will be interviewed by Krys Boyd of KERA’s “Think” program discussing “Brand Heroism: Advertising As a Force for Good” in the 2008 ExxonMobil Lecture Series. The April 10 lecture begins at 8 p.m. in Caruth Auditorium, with a coffee and chocolate reception at 9 p.m. in the Owen Arts Center lobby. Sponsored by SMU’s Temerlin Advertising Institute and Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility. Admission is free; tickets are required. For more information, contact the Meadows Ticket Office, 8-2787 (8-ARTS).

April 3, 2008|Calendar Highlights|

For the Record: Oct. 18, 2007

J.C. Penney's Christmas catalogJoan Gosnell, Central University Libraries, discussed some little-known facts about the J.C. Penney story, including information culled from SMU’s JCPenney Collection, with the Ogden (Utah) Standard-Examiner Oct. 6, 2007. (Right, an image from an early J.C. Penney Company Christmas catalog.)

Craig Flournoy, Journalism, has been recognized by the Annette Strauss Institute for Civic Participation at the University of Texas at Austin as one of eight Texans who helped improve the lives of those who live in their communities. Read more.

Three music professors in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts have been selected for 2007 ASCAPlus Awards from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) in New York. José Bowen, Robert Frank and Simon Sargon received the cash awards, whose purpose is to reward composers “whose works have a unique prestige value for which adequate compensation would not otherwise be received, and to compensate those whose works are performed substantially in media not surveyed by ASCAP.”

Caroline Brettell, Anthropology, is co-author (with her graduate student Kristoffer Alstatt) of “The Agency of Immigrant Entrepreneurs: Biographies of the Self-Employed in Ethnic and Occupational Niches of the Urban Labor Market,” published in The Journal of Anthropological Research, 63 (3), 2007. A book she co-edited with James Hollifield, Political Science – Migration Theory: Talking Across Disciplines – has entered its second edition.

Kamal Saggi, Economics, has been appointed an associate editor of the Indian Growth and Development Review. He will present a paper at the Conference on the Economics of Competition and Innovation Oct. 26-27 at the University of California-Berkeley.

Beth Newman, English, read a paper titled “The Vulgarity of Elegance: Social Mobility, Middle-Class Language, and the Victorian Novel” at the North American Victorian Studies Association conference in Victoria, British Columbia. The paper was excerpted from an essay that will appear in a collection titled Victorian Vulgarity, forthcoming from Ashgate Publishing.

Mark Vamos, Journalism, talked about the rollout of the FOX Business Network in The New York Daily News Oct. 12, 2007.

Peter Vogel, Law, discussed the increasing lack of usefulness of e-mail disclaimers in The Dallas Morning News Oct. 10, 2007.

Marianne Piepenburg, Development, discussed the tax benefits and other considerations involved in bequeathing a house or other real property to an alma mater through a retained life estate in the July 2007 issue of Kiplinger’s Retirement Report.

October 18, 2007|For the Record|
Load More Posts