Meadows School to explore community engagement and the arts with Ignite Arts Dallas

Meadows Prize

Meadows School to explore community engagement and the arts with Ignite Arts Dallas

Clyde Valentin, director of arts and urbanism and Ignite Arts Dallas in SMU's Meadows School of the Arts

Clyde Valentín, director of the arts and urbanism initiative in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, will lead Ignite Arts Dallas.

SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts has launched a new initiative to focus on the intersections of arts and community engagement among Meadows School students, the University campus, the city of Dallas and the arts at large.

Under the leadership of Clyde Valentín, director of the Meadows School’s arts and urbanism initiative, Ignite Arts Dallas will integrate artistic practices with community engagement in Dallas and other communities across the country.

“Over the past several years the Meadows School has increasingly focused on the intersection of the arts and social engagement,” said Sam Holland, Algur H. Meadows Dean of the Meadows School. “Ignite Arts Dallas will bring together under one umbrella our existing programs in these areas, like the annual Meadows Prize, and spark new ideas for programs that will position the Meadows School and Dallas as a national model for art as civic practice.”

The Meadows Prize invites internationally recognized artists and scholars to interact with Meadows students and create a lasting work in Dallas, and students and faculty from throughout the school’s 11 disciplines are involved with projects that support diverse communities in the city. The 2015 winners of the Meadows Prize residency are the Detroit-based artist collective Complex Movements and Lear deBessonet, director of The Public Theater’s Public Works program in New York City.

A second major project of Ignite Arts Dallas, titled P3, will present non-traditional, multidisciplinary performance art work exploring the themes of racial and cultural equity, religion, immigration and the environment. An inaugural gift of $225,000 from the Embrey Family Foundation will enable P3 to showcase four works in Dallas between fall 2015 and fall 2017. The works will feature international, national and local artists working in collaboration with SMU students and community members. P3 also plans to commission a work from a local artist to be developed and produced in Dallas in spring 2017.

“The P3 series is designed to ‘seed’ a pipeline where creators of mid-size performance art projects begin to make Dallas a regular location for the development and presentation of work,” said Valentín, who served as executive director of the New York City-based Hip-Hop Theater Festival before coming to SMU in October 2013. “It is also a vital way to reach into the community and collaborate with organizations such as the AT&T Performing Arts Center, the South Dallas Cultural Center, Dallas Video Fest and others, while offering our students experiences beyond the classroom and the campus.”

The third major program of Ignite Arts Dallas will be the Dallas Arts Project, which will help bring work created in Dallas to completion and will advocate for exporting it to other communities. Through myriad cultural collaborations and interactions, Valentín and Meadows School faculty members and students will work to enhance Dallas’s existing arts and culture ecosystem and encourage people to think of Dallas’s culture in new ways while connecting that cultural energy to other creative communities around the country.

“Our vision for Ignite Arts Dallas is to engage in deep relationships with the broader Dallas community and to introduce students to the arts’ critical role in social engagement,” said Valentín. “Our tagline is ‘people, place, purpose,’ the main ingredients that create meaningful change, with the arts serving as a connector between various sectors that build community. The arts have the ability to shape the narrative of progress for Dallas and other urban centers across the country. Through our work with exemplary artists, cultural organizers and artistic scholars, we will contribute to a vision of our cities where the arts are integrated into our communities and where the modern urban fabric is built on a foundation of equity and sustainability.”

Written by Victoria Winkelman

> Read the full story at SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts website

 

May 13, 2015|News|

Artist collective Complex Movements, Public Theater’s Lear deBessonet win 2015 Meadows Prize

Artist collective Complex Movements, photo by Vanessa Miller

The artist collective Complex Movements is a recipient of SMU’s 6th annual Meadows Prize arts residency. Photo credit: Vanessa Miller

SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts has announced the recipients of its 6th annual Meadows Prize arts residency: the Detroit-based artist collective Complex Movements and Lear deBessonet, director of The Public Theater’s Public Works program in New York City.

The Meadows Prize is awarded to pioneering artists and creative professionals who are active in one or more disciplines represented by the academic units within the Meadows School.

Complex Movements is a Detroit-based artist collective developing interactive performance work that draws connections between complex science and social justice movements to support the transformation of communities. The group is comprised of graphic designer/fine artist Wesley Taylor; music producer/filmmaker Waajeed; lyricist/organizer Invincible; and multimedia artist/performance systems architect Carlos Garcia. Their work draws on multiple disciplines, including community organizing, design, music, architecture, storytelling, multimedia art and theater.

For their Meadows Prize project, Complex Movements will collaborate with the Dallas community and the Meadows School on a week-long residency in February, and return in October for a four-week engagement of Beware of the Dandelions in Dallas’s Fair Park.

Beware of the Dandelions is a performance-based installation that also functions as a workshop space and a visual arts exhibition. Participant activity occurs inside a 400-square-foot polyhedron pod structure designed in collaboration with Detroit-based architect Aaron Jones to create an immersive visual and sound experience. Through community collaboration and the interdisciplinary nature of the installation, Complex Movements seeks to raise the visibility of local issues and social justice-based art and activism.

> More about Beware of the Dandelions from Emergence Media

Lear deBessonet, photo credit Matthew Murphy

Lear deBessonet will visit SMU in spring 2015 as part of her Meadows Prize arts residency. Photo credit: Matthew Murphy

Lear deBessonet is director of Public Works – a major initiative of The Public Theater that engages the people of New York as theater creators as well as spectators. Working with community partner organizations in all areas of the city, Public Works invites members of diverse communities to participate in theater workshops, attend classes and productions, and become involved in the daily life of The Public.

Under deBessonet’s leadership, Public Works deliberately blurs the line between professional artists and community members, creating theater that is by and of the people. For her Meadows Prize project, the Baton Rouge, Louisiana native will spearhead a new co-production between the Meadows School and the Dallas Theater Center of The Tempest, to be developed for spring 2017.

Lear’s first visit to Dallas will be in spring 2015. This co-production marks a new form and scale for a Meadows Prize project and will engage hundreds of volunteers, community partners from across Dallas, and the institutional collaboration and alignment between SMU, The Public Theater and the Dallas Theater Center.

> The New York Times: Lear deBessonet Puts Her Stamp on The Winter’s Tale

“We’re very excited to welcome Complex Movements and Lear deBessonet to the Meadows School as our sixth-year recipients of the Meadows Prize,” said Meadows Dean Sam Holland. “Both help us advance important elements of the vision for the Meadows School – to allow our students to interact with artists at the top of their fields and to integrate the Meadows School more deeply into our community.”

Inaugurated in October 2009, the Meadows Prize is presented annually to up to two pioneering artists. It includes support for a residency in Dallas, in addition to a $25,000 stipend. In return, recipients are expected to interact in a substantive way with Meadows students and collaborating arts organizations, and to leave a lasting legacy in Dallas, such as a work of art that remains in the community, a composition or piece of dramatic writing that would be performed locally, or a new way of teaching in a particular discipline.

> Read the full story from the Meadows School of the Arts website

February 11, 2015|For the Record, News|

Choreographer Jawole Willa Jo Zollar wins 2014 Meadows Prize

Jawole Willa Jo ZollarSMU’s Meadows School of the Arts has chosen choreographer Jawole Willa Jo Zollar as the recipient of its 5th annual Meadows Prize arts residency.

The Kansas City native is the founder of Urban Bush Women (UBW), a performance ensemble dedicated to exploring the use of cultural expression as a catalyst for social change. In 2006 she received a New York Dance and Performance Award (Bessie) for her work as choreographer/creator of Walking With Pearl…Southern Diaries.

Featured in the PBS documentary Free to Dance, which chronicles the African American influence on modern dance, Zollar was designated a Master of Choreography by the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in 2005. She earned a B.A. in dance from the University of Missouri-Kansas City and an M.F.A. in dance from Florida State University.

UBW has toured five continents and has performed at venues including Brooklyn Academy of Music, Lincoln Center for the Performing Arts and the Kennedy Center. The ensemble was selected as one of three U.S. dance companies to inaugurate a cultural diplomacy program for the U.S. Department of State in 2010. In 2012, Zollar was a featured artist in the film Restaging Shelter, produced and directed by Bruce Berryhill and Martha Curtis, and currently available to PBS stations.

Zollar will conduct the first half of her residency at SMU Feb. 17-28, working with Meadows dance students to restage her recent work Chalabati, which she originally choreographed for the UBW repertoire. The students will perform Chalabati as part of Meadows’ Spring Dance Concert, taking place March 26-30.

“We’re very excited to welcome Jawole Zollar to the Meadows School as our fifth-year recipient of the Meadows Prize arts residency,” said Meadows Dean José Bowen. “Jawole’s work with the UBW embodies the incredible impact that innovative artists can have on their communities – an invaluable lesson for our students at the Meadows School and our broader Dallas community.”

Inaugurated in October 2009, the Meadows Prize is presented each fall to up to two pioneering artists. It includes support for a four-to-eight-week residency in Dallas, in addition to a $25,000 stipend. In return, recipients are expected to interact in a substantive way with Meadows students and collaborating arts organizations, and to leave a lasting legacy in Dallas, such as a work of art that remains in the community, a composition or piece of dramatic writing that would be performed locally, or a new way of teaching in a particular discipline.

Read the full story at SMU News

February 13, 2014|News|

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 25, 2013

GM121412-0236

Dr. Eric Bing via George W. Bush Institute

New adventures in global health: SMU and Bush Institute concurrent appointee Eric Bing will speak on conquering the challenges of global health in “Making a Cure for Cancer as Accessible as Coca-Cola” at 5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25 in Room 131, Dedman Life Sciences Building. His lecture will include discussion of his work as creator of Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, an $85 million public-private partnership to reduce cervical and breast cancer in low-resource settings. Bing received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School, a master of public health and Ph.D. in epidemiology from UCLA, and an M.B.A. from Fuqua School of Business at Duke University. He is Senior Fellow and Director of Global Health in the George W. Bush Institute and a professor of global health in SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development and in Dedman College’s Department of Anthropology. The lecture is free.

The Usefulness of Art: Meadows Prize winner Tania Bruguera and SMU Associate Professor of Art Noah Simblist will host a conversation on the use of art in exploring real-world issues at 7 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 25 at the Texas Theatre, 213 W. Jefferson Boulevard in Oak Cliff. Bruguera, a 2013-14 Meadows Prize Winner and Meadows Visiting Artist, founded Immigrant Movement International, a think tank for immigrant issues that offers free educational, artistic and consciousness-raising activities to the immigrant community. Simblist won the 2007 Moss/Chumley Artist Award presented by the Meadows Museum and was recently a guest blogger for Art21. The conversation is presented by Contemporary Art Dealers of Dallas and SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts.

Stanton Sharp Lecture: SMU’s Clements Department of History presents “Revolution, Reform and Rejuvenation: A Century of Intellectual Service in ChinaWednesday, Sept. 25 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Timothy Cheek, professor and Louis Cha Chair in Chinese Research in the University of British Columbia’s Institute of Asian Research, will speak on China’s intellectuals from the start of Modern Turmoil in the 1890s to the declared “victory” of a Rising China at the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Cheek will explore China’s intellectuals by tracking five notable Chinese from across the century who all sought to “serve the people.” Cheek has written three books and is currently editing The Cambridge Critical Introduction to Mao. The event begins with a reception at 6 p.m.; the lecture follows at 6:30 p.m.

Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenco Morales

Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenco Morales, via Riviera 24

Music at Meadows: Brothers Jose Manuel and Francisco Cuenca Morales will perform a chamber program for piano and guitar at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 26 in the Bob & Jean Smith Auditorium, Meadows Museum. The duo was born in Spain, have performed throughout the world and recorded five albums. Critics rave that their music is “unique in the way both instruments melt as one with grand elegance and fine touch.” The concert is free and open to the public.

September 25, 2013|Calendar Highlights|

Nadia Sirota, Tania Bruguera named 2013-14 Meadow Prize winners

SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts has announced that violist Nadia Sirota and interdisciplinary artist Tania Bruguera are the recipients of its 4th annual Meadows Prize arts residency.

The Meadows Prize is awarded to pioneering artists and scholars with an emerging international profile, active in a discipline represented by one of the academic units within the Meadows School.

“The aim of the Meadows Prize is to connect artists at the forefront of their fields with our students and with the community – artists who produce new ideas, new work or new methods,” said Meadows Dean José Bowen. “Nadia and Tania push the boundaries of contemporary music and performance art, and our students will have the incredible opportunity to work directly with them. We are eager to see what develops from their residencies in Dallas.”

Nadia Sirota is best known for her unique interpretations of new scores and for premiering works by some of the most talented composers of her generation, including Marcos Balter, Caleb Burhans, Judd Greenstein, Missy Mazzoli and Nico Muhly. She is a founding member of ACME (the American Contemporary Music Ensemble), yMusic, and the Wordless Music Orchestra and is a regular guest with groups such as the Meredith Monk Ensemble, Alarm Will Sound and Continuum.

Sirota’s debut album, First Things First, was a New York Times 2009 record of the year. In addition to her work as a performer, she has served on the faculty of the Manhattan School of Music in its new contemporary music performance master’s degree program since 2007. She will be in residency at SMU April 1-14, 2013 and Oct. 7-19, 2013 and will collaborate with student musicians on the development of new compositions and performance techniques.

Tania Bruguera is a Cuban-born interdisciplinary artist working primarily in behavior art, performance, installation and video – with much of her work pivoting around growing concerns about the political representation and conditions facing immigrants. Her work has been featured in Documenta 11 in Germany and in the Venice, Johannesburg, Sáo Paolo, Shanghai and Havana biennials.

In March 2011, Bruguera began a five-year social project, Immigrant Movement International, the first year of which was sponsored by Meadows Prize winner Creative Time and the Queens Museum of Art. IM International functions as a think tank for immigrant issues; from its storefront headquarters in Corona, Queens, Bruguera and other staff and volunteers offer free educational, artistic and consciousness-raising activities to a community of immigrants. Bruguera is a proponent of “arte útil” (useful art), meaning art that can be implemented in people’s lives in ways that address social and political problems. In February, she will launch a new project with the Queens Museum and Van Abbemuseum in the Netherlands, culminating in the transformation of the old building of the Van Abbemuseum into the Museum of Arte Útil this fall. Bruguera will be in residency at SMU April 7-20, 2013 and Sept. 22-Oct. 5, 2013.

Inaugurated in October 2009, the Meadows Prize is presented each January to up to two pioneering artists. It includes support for a four-week residency in Dallas, in addition to a $25,000 stipend. In return, recipients are expected to interact in a substantive way with Meadows students and collaborating arts organizations, and to leave a lasting legacy in Dallas, such as a work of art that remains in the community, a composition or piece of dramatic writing that would be performed locally, or a new way of teaching in a particular discipline.

> Read the full story from SMU News
> Learn more about SMU’s Meadows Prize

January 22, 2013|News|
Load More Posts