Fulbright awards

Three SMU graduates receive 2017 Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Awards

Three recent SMU graduates have received 2017 Fulbright English Teaching Assistant Awards (ETA). The program place Fulbright recipients in classrooms abroad to provide assistance to local English teachers. The ETA’s help teach the English language while serving as cultural ambassadors for the United States.

Adam GarnickAdam Garnick, a graduate of the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, has received an ETA to teach next year in Budapest, Hungary.

Garnick earned a Master of Education degree in May. A native of Philadelphia, Garnick is an eighth-grade history teacher at Dallas’ E.H. Cary Middle School and a member of the Teach for America program. In Hungary, he will be teaching English with a focus on academic writing at Budapest Metropolitan University.

“My teaching along with my courses at SMU have provided a great foundation for what’s next,” Garnick said. “I feel prepared to teach at a university. I’m going to take the strategies I’ve learned in teaching English language learners to Budapest.”

At Simmons, Garnick conducted research on the “flipped classroom” as part of a technology and discourse course taught by Dara Rossi, clinical associate professor in the Department of Teaching and Learning. In a flipped classroom, students use classroom time for exploratory and collaborative work, and watch video lectures at home to prepare. “It’s a strategy I’ve been able to use in my classroom,” Garnick says. “I’m convinced it’s the future of education.”

Kristen BiedermannMaster of Education graduate Kristen Biedermann has accepted an ETA to spend 10 months teaching English at the University of Cauca in Popayan, Colombia, starting at the end of summer 2017.

“I had an opportunity to travel to Guatemala to help one of my professors with research and professional development for Guatemalan teachers on behalf of SMU,” Biedermann says. “I learned that when people acquire more than one language, it gives them an ability to connect across cultures, which is important to me, so I’ve become passionate about helping people cross barriers through learning a second language.”

That international classroom experience – and the time she spent teaching in bilingual Dallas-area classrooms before earning her Master’s in 2016 at SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development – sparked Biedermann’s interest in pursuing her studies further.

“When I come back from Colombia, I would love to go into the Ph.D. program, become a professor and do research on retention and promotion of language-minority students at the university level,” Biedermann says. “I hope to be able to work on a campus and help adult English-language-learner students succeed in higher education and conduct research that eliminates the inequities that exist at that level.”

Jennie LeeBachelor of Music and world languages graduate Jennie Lee has accepted an ETA to spend 10 months teaching English in Germany.

Building on the interests and activities she discovered at SMU before graduating in 2016, she’ll teach English through extra-curricular activities like after-school yoga classes and singing lessons.

“I studied opera in college and got a degree in vocal performance and world languages,” says Lee, who came to the University from a traditional conservatory prep school background and earned a place in the musical honor society Pi Kappa Lambda.

“The thing that drew me to SMU is the ability to get conservatory-style training – a super-intense program where I would study arts and music – but also have the opportunity to double major, because I wanted to do that too and a lot of schools don’t offer that,” Lee adds. “That was a huge pull for me.”

> Read more of their stories from SMU News

Law Professor Chris Jenks receives 2014-15 Fulbright Grant

Chris Jenks, SMU Dedman School of LawChris Jenks, an assistant professor in SMU’s Dedman School of Law, has been awarded a Fulbright Scholars Grant to spend six months in Australia researching how emerging technologies impact accountability in armed conflict.

Jenks, who joined the Dedman Law faculty in 2012, teaches and writes on the law of armed conflict and criminal justice. He also is director of the law school’s Criminal Justice Clinic. Beginning in January 2015, he will work in Melbourne at the Asia Pacific Centre for Military Law (APCML), a collaborative initiative between the Australian Department of Defense and Melbourne Law School.

At the APCML, Jenks will work closely with Bruce Oswald and Tim McCormack, two of the world’s foremost experts on international humanitarian law. McCormack, the founding director of the APCML, also serves as Special Adviser on International Humanitarian Law to the Office of the Prosecutor at the International Criminal Court (ICC) in The Hague.

“The APCML is the only entity in the world applying a systematic and holistic approach to technology and the law of armed conflict,” Jenks says. “It’s the best place in the world  to study the subject. I’m very excited by and for this opportunity.”

Jenks explains his Fulbright research: “Right now if there’s an air strike and civilians are killed, the law of armed conflict and state practice provide a framework through which we can determine when someone is criminally liable. But when the air strike is autonomous, or it is a cyber attack, who’s to blame? The commander? The software designer? A civilian programmer who may have entered the wrong line of code two years prior? We need to think more about and address such issues before they inevitably arise,” he says.

An internationally respected expert on the law of armed conflict, Jenks is co-author of a law of armed conflict textbook and co-editor of a forthcoming war crimes casebook. He served as a peer reviewer of The Tallinn Manual on the international law applicable to cyber warfare and the U.S. Army’s field manual on the law of land warfare. He has published articles on drones, child soldiers, extraordinary rendition, law of war-based detention, targeting and government contractors.

Jenks came to SMU following a 20-year career as an officer in the U.S. Army. In 2003, he was the lead prosecutor in the Army’s first counterterrorism case. In 2004, he deployed to Mosul, Iraq and served as chief legal advisor on investigations and as prosecutor for crimes against the civilian population, detainee abuse and friendly-fire incidents. Rising to the rank of Lt. Colonel, Jenks worked as the deputy chief of the U.S. Army’s litigation division, as an attorney adviser at the Department of State and the United Nations, and as chief of the International Law Branch of the Office of The Judge Advocate General in the Pentagon.

Jenks has received the Valorous Unit Award, the Bronze Star, and the Expert Infantryman and Parachutist Badges. He is a graduate of the United States Military Academy at West Point, the University of Arizona College of Law, the Judge Advocate General’s Legal Center and School, and Georgetown University Law School.

Written by Denise Gee

> Read the full story from SMU News

Theatre Professor Blake Hackler receives Fulbright Scholars Grant

Blake Hackler, assistant professor of theatre in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, has been awarded a Fulbright Scholars Grant to conduct teaching and research in Bulgaria.

Hackler will be in residence at New Bulgarian University in Sofia from January through June 2015, where he will teach and direct theatre, focusing on physical acting techniques. He will also observe and work with the Sfumato Theatre Laboratory, an internationally recognized theatre based in Sofia that produces highly physical interpretations of classic plays.

“My research and performance interests explore the ongoing disembodiment of the ‘actor-in-training’ as a result of deepening reliance on technology,” said Hackler. “Eastern Bloc theatre-makers, both pre- and post-Glasnost, have constantly pushed the boundaries of what the physical body can and should be capable of representing. It will be invaluable to spend time training and observing both the students and actors of Bulgaria and learning from them.”

Hackler joined the Meadows School faculty in fall 2011 and teaches four courses, including acting for both sophomores and first-year graduate students; theatre games and improvisation for graduate students; and “Acting in Song” for students pursuing the new minor in musical theatre. He also holds a teaching appointment at Yale University.

As an actor, Hackler has appeared in productions on Broadway, Off-Broadway and in regional theatres throughout the country, working with such acclaimed directors as Michael Mayer, Scott Ellis, Alex Timbers and Mike Alfreds. In New York, he worked with theatres including Playwrights Horizons, York Theatre, The Ohio, and Roundabout, as well as creating the role of Moritz Stiefel in the original New York workshop of the Tony-award winning musical Spring Awakening.

In Dallas, he is a company member at the nationally recognized Undermain Theatre, and has also appeared at the Trinity Shakespeare Festival, Dallas Theater Center, Second Thought Theatre and Theatre Three. Currently, he is the acting coach for comedian Lisa Lampanelli as she prepares her one-woman show, Skinny Bitch, for a Broadway run.

Hackler has taught at Roosevelt University, AMDA, the National Theatre Workshop for the Handicapped, and through the Kennedy Center as an Artist-in-Residence.  He also has studied with the SITI Company and its artistic director Anne Bogart and is a member of AEA and AFTRA. He received his M.F.A. from the Yale School of Drama.

> Read the full story from SMU News

Art History Chair Roberto Tejada wins Fulbright Distinguished Chair

Roberto Tejada, Distinguished Endowed Chair in Art History in SMU's Meadows School of the ArtsRoberto Tejada, Distinguished Endowed Chair in Art History in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, has been named the 2012-13 recipient of the Fulbright-FAAP Distinguished Chair in the Visual Arts.

The award from the Fulbright U.S. Scholar Program will allow Tejada to engage in scholarship with faculty and students at the Armando Alvares Penteado Foundation (FAAP) in São Paulo, Brazil.

One of four distinguished chairs in different disciplines established in Brazil by the Fulbright Scholar Program, the FAAP Distinguished Chair was created to call attention to U.S. scholars’ contributions to the development of the visual arts in Brazilian universities and in the arts community. FAAP is a prestigious arts school and cultural center in São Paulo, housing both a theater and the Museum of Brazilian Art.

Tejada, an internationally known specialist in modern and contemporary Latin American and Latino/U.S. visual culture, will spend four months at FAAP in Fall 2012 interacting with graduate and undergraduate students.

“My research in visual studies has encompassed a series of questions in the overlapping domains of art history, inter-American studies and critical theory,” he said. “I’ve had the opportunity to write about contemporary Brazilian artists for exhibition catalogs and other publications in Mexico and the United States, and I’ve more recently been devoting research to the greater art world of São Paulo. By contrasting contemporary art from Brazil and the United States, I look to locality as being critical to the production of art — as important as any meaning is to its representational effects.

“My goal as the Fulbright-FAAP Distinguished Chair in the Visual Arts is to establish the groundwork for productive exchanges between the Fundação Armando Alvares Penteado, SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, collecting institutions in the Dallas area, and other U.S. and international stakeholders in Brazil’s contemporary arts,” he said.

> Read the full story from SMU News

For the Record: April 23, 2009

Amy Revier, a senior studio art major and Hunt Leadership Scholar in Meadows School of the Arts, has received a Fulbright Grant to study in Iceland during 2009-10. She will work in the studio of internationally recognized sculpture and textile artist Hildur Bjarnadóttir in Reykjavik, as well as volunteer at the National Gallery of Iceland.

Two journalism majors in Meadows School of the Arts have been honored by the Fort Worth Professional Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. Senior Erin Eidenshink and Tiffany Glick (’08) received a 2008 First Amendment Award for In-Depth Reporting for their series on sexual assault, “Invisible Victims.” It is the 3rd time in 5 years that SMU students have won the award.

Santiago Nunez, a senior economics major in Dedman College, has received the 2009 Arthur A. Smith Memorial Award Recognizing Student Excellence in Economics for his essay “Lethal Black Gold: Nigeria’s Oil Curse and How to Cure It.” The DFW Association for Business Economics gives the award annually to an outstanding economics, business or finance undergraduate from an area university. The prize includes a $1,000 cash award.

Marko Pavlovic, a student of Carol Leone in the Artist Certificate degree program of Meadows School of the Arts, won 1st place in the piano division of the 25th annual Young Texas Artists Music Competition. The 3-day event is open to musicians, age 18-30, who are Texas residents or enrolled in a Texas college, university or music school.

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