Physicist named fellow of American Association for the Advancement of Science

SMU physicist Jodi Cooley has been named a fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS). Election as an AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed by their peers upon the group’s members for scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.

Jodi Cooley

Cooley is one of 416 fellows to be honored during the 2019 AAAS annual meeting in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, Feb. 16. She is being recognized for her contributions to the search for dark matter scattering with nuclei, particularly using cryogenic technologies. The nature of dark matter is unknown, but is believed to make up about 85 percent of the universe.

Cooley, who joined SMU in 2009, is associate professor of experimental particle physics in SMU’s Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

“I feel incredibly privileged to have even been nominated for such an honor; to be further elected as a Fellow of the AAAS is humbling beyond words,” Cooley said. “I also feel an immense sense of gratitude toward all of those who supported me along this path: my family, my friends, and my mentors.”

“Professor Cooley is a distinguished scientist with a record of outstanding federal research support and innovative experimental design,” said Dedman College Dean Thomas DiPiero. “In addition to her work in the lab and in the classroom, she also reaches out to the general public to explain the intricacies of particle physics in ways that are understandable and engaging.”

Cooley and her colleagues operated sophisticated detectors in the Soudan Underground Laboratory, Minn. The Department of Energy and National Science Foundation announced they’ll provide funding to expand that research, so planning is now under way to move the experiment to an even deeper location, SNOLAB in Canada, to improve the search for dark matter. These detectors can distinguish between elusive dark matter particles and background particles that mimic dark matter interactions.

Cooley is a principal investigator on the SuperCDMS dark matter experiment and was principal investigator for the AARM collaboration, whose aim was to develop integrative tools for underground science. She has won numerous awards for her research, including an Early Career Award from the National Science Foundation and the Ralph E. Powe Junior Faculty Enhancement Award from the Oak Ridge Associated Universities.

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Faculty members awarded Sam Taylor Fellowships

Twenty-six SMU faculty members have received 2019-20 Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

The fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the fellowships, which support research, “advancing the intellectual, social or religious life of Texas and the nation.”

Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation and the project’s sensitivity to value questions confronting higher education and society.

The winning professors for this academic year, by college or school:

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

Holly Bowen, Psychology
Lucas Kirkpatrick, Sociology
Andrea Laurent-Simpson, Sociology
Bianca Lopez, History
Beth Newman, English
Christopher Roos, Anthropology
Nicolas Sternsdorff-Cisterna, Anthropology
Minh Binh Tran, Mathematics
Emma Wilson, English
Jingbo Ye, Physics

Lyle School of Engineering

Jaewook Myung, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Wenjie Sun, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Jianhui Wang, Electrical Engineering

Meadows School of the Arts

LaShonda Eaddy, Corporate Communication and Public Affairs
Adam Herring, Art History
Yan Huang, Advertising
Kristina Nielsen, Music
Nishiki Sugawara-Beda, Art
Hye Jin Yoon, Advertising

Perkins School of Theology

Ted Campbell, Church History
Jaime Clark-Soles, New Testament
Natalia Marandiuc, Christian Theology
Harold Recinos, Church and Society
Marcell Steuernagel, Sacred Music

Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development

Doris Luft Santos Baker, Teaching and Learning
Ashley Tull, Higher Education

SMU Triumph of the Spirit Human Rights Award to honor international Nazi hunters Beate and Serge Klarsfeld

The world’s best-known Nazi hunters, Beate and Serge Klarsfeld, will make a rare visit to Dallas Nov. 15 to accept SMU’s global 2018 Triumph of the Spirit Award, presented by the Embrey Human Rights Program in SMU Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences.

The docents of the Dallas Holocaust Museum/Center for Education and Tolerance also will receive the award for their dedication to educating museum-goers about the history of the Holocaust and advancing human rights to fight prejudice, hatred and indifference.

“We want to recognize the bridge between those who led the effort to pursue justice on behalf of the victims of the Holocaust and those educators who are working to ensure that current and future generations will remember what can happen when people remain silent in the face of an assault on humanity and dignity,” said Rick Halperin, director of SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program.

The Triumph of the Spirit Award is a biennial award presented to Dallas-based and global human rights leaders in honor of their accomplishments, innovation and commitment to human rights. The dinner and celebration will begin at 6 p.m., Nov. 15, in the Mack Ballroom in Umphrey Lee Center, 3300 Dyer St., on the SMU campus. Sponsorship opportunities and tickets are available at Triumph of the Spirit Award.

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Eighteen SMU professors receive tenure, promotion for 2017-18

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Eighteen outstanding SMU faculty members will begin the 2017-18 academic year with new tenure as associate professors or promotion to full professorships.

The following individuals have received tenure or promotion effective Friday, Sept. 1, 2017:

Cox School of Business

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Stanimir Markov, Accounting

Dedman College of Humanities and Sciences

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Karisa Cloward, Political Science
  • Erin Hochman, History
  • Chrystyna Kouros, Psychology
  • Benno Rumpf, Mathematics
  • Jayson Sae-Saue, English
  • Brian Zoltowski, Chemistry

Recommended for tenure (associate professorship previously awarded):

  • Barry Lee, Mathematics

Dedman School of Law

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Chris Jenks, Law (autonomous weapons, military law, national security law, evidence, criminal law, international law, human rights)

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Thomas Wm. Mayo, Law (bioethics, election law, health law, nonprofit/tax-exempt organizations)
  • Meghan J. Ryan, Law (law and science, torts, criminal law, criminal procedure, death penalty, actual innocence)
  • Joshua C. Tate, Law (legal history, trusts and estates, property)

Meadows School of the Arts

Recommended for tenure and promotion to Associate Professor:

  • Archie Cummings, Theatre
  • Amy Freund, Art History
  • Jon Hackler, Theatre
  • Peter Kupfer, Music (Musicology)
  • Brian Molanphy, Art

Recommended for promotion to Full Professor:

  • Carol Leone, Music (Piano)

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‘Why Standing Rock Matters’ is topic for Clements Center panel discussion Monday, Oct. 24, 2016

'Why Standing Rock Matters' graphicThe national protests over the Dakota Access Pipeline have drawn thousands to rallies throughout the country, including Dallas. What is Standing Rock and its history, and what is the basis of the dispute over the pipeline?

An invited panel moderated by Ben Voth, associate professor of corporate communications and public affairs in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts, will take on these questions and more at SMU.

“Why Standing Rock Matters: Can Oil and Water Mix?” will take place 6-7:30 p.m. Monday, Oct. 24, 2016 in Crum Auditorium, Collins Executive Education Center.

A reception will precede the panel discussion at 5:30 p.m. Both the reception and forum are free and open to the public. Register online at Eventbrite or call the Clements Center at 214-768-3684.

> Learn more at SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies website

The panelists include the following experts, who will each bring a different perspective to the discussion:

  • Archaeology – Kelly Morgan is president of Lakota Consulting LLC, which provides professional cultural and tribal liaison services in field archaeology. She works to protect cultural and natural resources alongside other archaeologists and environmentalists in North Dakota, Montana, South Dakota and on the island of Guam. Currently she is the tribal archaeologist for Standing Rock Sioux Tribe. Morgan received her PhD. in American Indian studies from the University of Oklahoma.
  • Energy – Craig Stevens is a spokesman for the Midwest Alliance for Infrastructure Now (MAIN), a partnership aimed at supporting the economic development and energy security benefits in the Midwest. MAIN is a project of the Iowa State Building and Construction Trades Council, with members in Iowa, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Illinois – the states crossed by the proposed Dakota Access Pipeline. Previously Stevens served as a spokesman for two cabinet secretaries, a surgeon general, and a member of Congress. He also worked on two presidential campaigns.
  • Environmental – Andrew Quicksall is the J. Lindsay Embrey Trustee Associate Professor of Environmental Engineering in SMU’s Lyle School of Engineering. His research focuses on aqueous metal enrichment and water contamination in the natural environment by probing both solution and solid chemistry of natural materials. He received his Ph.D. in earth science from Dartmouth College.
  • Tribal history – Cody Two Bears, Standing Rock Sioux Tribal Councilman and tribal member who represents the Cannon Ball district of the Standing Rock Sioux in North Dakota.
  • Law – Eric Reed (Choctaw Nation), J.D., is a Dallas lawyer who specializes in American Indian law, tribal law and international indigenous rights. Reed received a B.S in economics and finance and a B.A. in anthropology from SMU and his J.D. from the University of Iowa College of Law.
  • Mechanical – Tayeb “Ty” Benchaita is a managing partner of B&G Products and Services LLP, a consulting company in Houston that specializes in products quality control and assurance, products manufacturing and operations for the oil, fuels petrochemical, oil refining, lubricants, re-refining, and environmental industries. He holds a Ph.D. in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and executive management training from the Harvard Business School.
  • Public policy – Michael Lawson is president of MLL Consulting which provides historical research and analysis for government agencies, Native American tribes, law firms and other private clients. Additionally, he is of counsel to Morgan, Angel & Associates, L.L.C. in Washington, D.C., where he formerly served as a partner. Lawson received his Ph.D. in American history and cultural anthropology from the University of New Mexico and is author of Dammed Indians Revisited: The Continuing History of the Pick-Sloan Plan and the Missouri River Sioux (South Dakota State Historical Society: 2010).

The event is cosponsored by SMU’s William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies and Maguire Energy Institute, with support from the University’s Dedman College of Humanities and  Sciences, Cox School of Business, William P. Clements Department of History, Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute through the Scott-Hawkins Fund, and Center for Presidential History.