Bush Presidential Center

SMU faculty to help lead immigration history conference at Dallas’ Old Red Museum Sept. 19, 2015

Immigrants going through San Angelo, Texas - early photograph, Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photography Collection

A photo by M.C. Ragsdale ca. 1885-90 of immigrants passing through San Angelo, Texas. From the Lawrence T. Jones III Texas Photography Collection, DeGolyer Library, SMU.

The challenging task of teaching a controversial subject to middle- and high-school students will be the focus of an upcoming immigration conference featuring several University faculty members.

SMU and the Old Red Museum of Dallas County History & Culture are partnering with Humanities Texas and the Texas Historical Commission to present a conference on the history of U.S. immigration from 8:30 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 19, 2015 at the museum.

“Issues surrounding immigration are at the forefront of public discourse these days,” said Zac Harmon, executive director of the Old Red Museum. “Statistics and beliefs are strongly held but are often mistaken for facts. This conference will provide documented, factual information for teachers, politicians and other citizens who really want to understand the issue. We are grateful to the Philip R. Jonsson Foundation for sponsoring this first of what we hope will become an annual conference.”

Conference participants can choose to hear two of six speakers scheduled during the morning session. Lunch and a keynote address by Margaret Spellings, president of the George W. Bush Presidential Center and former secretary of education (2005-09), will follow.

Afternoon breakout sessions will provide teachers with lesson plans, materials and strategies to help them make history come alive for students of all grade levels. Teachers attending both sessions can earn six Continuing Professional Education (CPE) credits.

Topics and speakers include:

  • “D/FW Becoming an Immigrant Gateway” – Caroline Brettell, University Distinguished Professor of Anthropology and Ruth Collins Altshuler Director of SMU’s Dedman College Interdisciplinary Institute
  • “Gone To Texas: Immigration to the Lone Star State in the 19th Century” – Gregg Cantrell, Emma and Ralph Lowe Chair of Texas History, TCU
  • “Immigration and the Changing Face of America” – Neil Foley, Robert and Nancy Dedman Chair in History, Dedman College
  • “Visualizing the Changing Landscape of U.S. Immigration” – Kyle Walker, assistant professor of population and urban geography, TCU
  • “Managing Migration in an Era of Globalization” – James F. Hollifield, Ora Nixon Arnold Professor of International Political Economy and director of SMU’s Tower Center for Political Studies
  • “Immigration and the Changing Demography of Liberal Democracies” – Gary Freeman, professor of government, University of Texas-Austin

Registration, which includes a continental breakfast, lunch, parking, materials and access to the exhibit area, is $25 and can be completed online at www.oldred.org. For information, contact Shannon Page at the Old Red Museum, 214-757-1927.

Written by Kenny Ryan

Bush Center celebrates Oscar de la Renta with “Five Decades of Style” through Oct. 5, 2014

Bush Center Oscar de la Renta exhibit, 'Five Decades of Style'

Photo credit: The George W. Bush Presidential Center

The George W. Bush Presidential Center is hosting a major retrospective of American fashion designer Oscar de la Renta, from his earliest work to his most recent runway masterpieces.

Oscar de la Renta: Five Decades of Style” features several of the designer’s styles for Nancy Reagan, Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush (’68) – offering a unique look at the First Lady’s role as the nation’s official hostess and style ambassador. Also featured are outfits worn by members of First Families, including Jenna Bush’s wedding dress.

The exhibit also focuses on de la Renta’s Spanish and garden inspirations, as well as his use of motifs and silhouettes from cultures around the globe. Other sections detail his red-carpet work for stars of stage, screen and high society, and highlight the craftsmanship that goes into the creation of couture clothing.

SMU faculty, staff and students receive free admission to the Bush Center with their University IDs. The De la Renta exhibit runs through Sunday, Oct. 5, 2014.

> Find more details and images at the Bush Center’s “Oscar de la Renta: Five Decades of Style” homepage

SMU celebrates Founders’ Day Weekend 2014

TEDxSMUSMU celebrates 2014 Founders’ Day Weekend April 10-13 with a new, TEDx-powered edition of its popular academic spotlight events.

Inside SMU Powered by TEDxSMU features SMU faculty members, students and alumni in TED-style talks on topics ranging from the importance of failure to the power of kindness. Registration takes places noon-1 p.m. Friday, April 11, with sessions scheduled 1-5 p.m. that afternoon.

> Find a full list of Inside SMU Powered by TEDxSMU speakers

Friday activities also include the 2014 SMU President’s Briefing and Centennial Faculty Salute, in which President R. Gerald Turner presents an insider’s view of the University’s progress.

For the day’s final event, the SMU community will  join in the beloved student tradition of Sing Song. This year’s show, “Pop Icons,” begins at 8 p.m. in McFarlin Auditorium.

Saturday, April 12 is Community Day at SMU. From 10 a.m. to 2 p.m., visitors can participate in special events at Meadows Museum, the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum, and the Bush Presidential Center Native Texas Park.

> Read the full schedule of Community Day at SMU events

Designated as the third Friday in April each year, the day recognizes “the visionary institutions, organizations and individuals that founded the University on April 17, 1911,” according to the SMU 100 website.

The University marked the 100-year anniversary of its founding in 1911 and will mark the centennial of its opening in 1915 during The Second Century Celebration.

Find a complete schedule at the Founders’ Day Weekend homepage
Learn more about the SMU Centennial at the Second Century Celebration website
Relive memories of the first Founders’ Day Weekend with this SMU News video video

Calendar Highlights: Oct. 5, 2011

Archivist of the United States David FerrieroThrough an archivist’s eyes: David Ferriero (right), 10th Archivist of the United States, will give a close-up view of the mission and history of the National Archives with “An Insider’s Perspective: The Mission of the National Archives and the Creation of the George W. Bush Presidential Library” at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 6 in the Mack Grand Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center. A 6 p.m. reception will precede the lecture. Sponsored by SMU’s DeGolyer Library, Friends of the SMU Libraries/Colophon, Bridwell Library and the Book Club of Texas. For more information contact Cindy Ruppi, 214-768-2253.

Writings on rights: SMU’s Embrey Human Rights Program presents an evening with a group of international refugees, asylum seekers and other forced migrants currently living in North Texas. “Escape to Dallas: Stories of Flight & Survival” will feature readings of original stories and writings by the presenters, who will share their experiences of flight from conflict and political and economic threats, as well as of their resettlement in the Dallas area. The event takes place 7-9 p.m. Oct. 6 in McCord Auditorium, 306 Dallas Hall. Free and open to the public. For more information, contact Sherry Aikman, 214-768-8347, and visit the Refugee Writers blog.

Local discounts: Designer Shoe Warehouse Park Cities has scheduled an SMU appreciation event for 5-9 p.m. Oct. 11, 2011. Present their flier (downloadable in PDF format) to receive 20% off regularly priced items and 10% off clearance merchandise. The store is located at 8335 Westchester Drive in Preston Center.

In McFarlin Auditorium:
• Dr. Temple Grandin, the Colorado State University professor whose life with animals and with autism became a Golden Globe Award-winning HBO movie, will present “An Evening with Temple Grandin: Animals Make Us Human” at 8 p.m. Oct. 6 in McFarlin Auditorium. Presented by Guide Dogs for the Blind and Lone Star Puppy Raisers. Buy tickets online at TicketLeap.

Sept. 1 deadline for Fall 2011 Bush Presidential Center student internships

George W. Bush Presidential Center logoThe Office of George W. Bush and the George W. Bush Presidential Center are seeking SMU students for unpaid Fall 2011 internships. The deadline for application is 5 p.m. Central time Thursday, Sept. 1, extended from the original deadline of Aug. 26.

Undergraduate positions are available in foundation administration; event planning; development and donor relations; marketing and communications; and for Bush Institute departments including Education Reform, Human Freedom, Global Health, Economic Growth, the Women’s Initiative, and the Military Service Initiative.

Internship opportunities are also available in Washington, D.C, at the office of the Executive Director of the Bush Institute.

Graduate-level internships are available with the Education Reform and Editorial teams.

Rising juniors, seniors or graduate students currently enrolled at SMU with GPAs of 3.0 or higher are eligible to apply. Interns must be available to work a minimum of 15 hours per week.

Students can find a complete list of requirements and apply online at employment.georgewbushcenter.com (enter keyword internship). Late or incomplete applications will not be considered. For more information, contact the Office of George W. Bush, 214-692-4300.

George W. Bush Presidential Center breaks ground at SMU

Bush Presidential Center groundbreaking at SMU

More than 3,000 guests filled a massive tent on the site of the George W. Bush Presidential Center to celebrate groundbreaking for the building. Fifteen officials took up shovels to turn dirt, marking the official start of construction, with completion scheduled for 2013.

“Today is another milestone along a timeline that began for us in December 2000, when we began our effort to bring the George W. Bush Presidential Center to the University,” SMU President R. Gerald Turner told the crowd.

“We knew that this Presidential Center would benefit from its association with SMU because of the academic resources, vitality of dialogue and research programs we offer. Having the historic resources of the Library and Museum will provide remarkable opportunities for research and educational experiences for more than 200,000 K-13 students in the Metroplex,” Turner said.

George W. Bush welcomed the crowd, saying “To those of you who are not privileged to live in Texas, welcome to the great state. And welcome to one of the finest universities in the whole United States, Southern Methodist.” He said the groundbreaking “is an important milestone” and “the beginning of a journey. We take the first step toward the construction of this presidential center, which will be a dynamic hub of ideas and actions based upon timeless principles.”

Participating in the groundbreaking for the Bush Presidential Center were (left to right above) David S. Ferriero, Archivist of the United States; Ray Hunt, co-chair of the Bush Foundation Finance Committee, SMU trustee and chairman of Hunt Oil Company; Caren Prothro, chair of the SMU Board of Trustees; Alan Lowe, director of the Bush Presidential Library and Museum; Robert Stern, architect for the Bush Presidential Center; R. Gerald Turner, president of SMU; Condoleezza Rice, chair of the Bush Institute Advisory Board and former U.S. Secretary of State; George W. Bush; Laura Bush; Dick Cheney, former U.S. Vice President and former SMU trustee; Mark Langdale, president of the George W. Bush Foundation; Don Evans, co-chair of the Bush Foundation Finance Committee and former U.S. Secretary of Commerce; Michael Van Valkenburgh, landscape architect for the Bush Presidential Center; the Rev. Mark Craig, SMU trustee and pastor of Highland Park United Methodist Church; and Jake Torres, SMU student body president.

The Center includes the George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum and the George W. Bush Institute.

> Read the whole story from SMU News
> Dignitaries visit with SMU students
> Watch video of the groundbreaking video
> See a slideshow of groundbreaking day slideshow
> Learn more about SMU and the Bush Center
> Visit the official Bush Center website

History in the making: Bush Presidential Center groundbreaking is Nov. 16

Bush Presidential Center Groundbreaking logoSMU students, faculty and staff are invited to participate in a moment of history: the groundbreaking ceremony for the George W. Bush Presidential Center. The event begins at 10:30 a.m. Tuesday, Nov. 16, 2010, at the southwest corner of SMU Boulevard and North Central Expressway (the Center’s future home).

A limited number of seats in the ceremonial tent may become available just before 10:30 a.m. for interested SMU community members. Seats in the tent will be made available on a first-come, first-served basis to current University students, faculty and staff. Eligible members of the SMU community may line up at the northwest corner of Binkley Avenue and Dublin Street beginning at 8 a.m. Nov. 16, subject to the following guidelines:

  • Bring your valid SMU ID.
  • Small purses, wallets, cameras, cell phones and keys are permitted. No large purses, backpacks, bags or video cameras are allowed.
  • Business attire is appropriate. Commemorative T-shirts will be distributed for those who wish to wear them.

Individuals not seated in the tent will be directed to the all-University celebration at the Mustang Mall in front of Moody Coliseum, where light refreshments and a live simulcast of the groundbreaking ceremony will be provided. Commemorative T-shirts will be distributed to all guests at the Mustang Mall. The festivities begin at 8 a.m.; the groundbreaking ceremony broadcast begins at 10:30 a.m. (In the event of rain, the celebration will be held at Moody Coliseum.)

All community members will have the opportunity to watch a live webcast of the groundbreaking ceremony. Register online at georgewbushcenter.com.

> Learn more from SMU’s Bush Presidential Center information site

By | 2010-11-15T15:16:39+00:00 November 15, 2010|Categories: Calendar Highlights, News|Tags: , |

Laura Bush unveils plans for Presidential Center

Laura Bush with Bush Presidential Center modelFormer First Lady Laura Bush visited the SMU campus Nov. 18 to unveil architectural and landscaping designs for the George W. Bush Presidential Center. The following account comes courtesy of The George W. Bush Presidential Center:


DALLAS–Mrs. Laura W. Bush, Architect Robert A. M. Stern and Landscape Architect Matthew Urbanski today unveiled the design of the George W. Bush Presidential Center, a modern brick and limestone structure that complements the American Georgian character of the SMU campus, set within a low-maintenance, quintessentially Texas landscape.

The light-filled building is both presidential and welcoming, includes elements that evoke both Texas and Washington, and will house the three components of the George W. Bush Presidential Center: an Archive, a Museum and a policy Institute.

“I applaud the work of Robert Stern and Michael Van Valkenburgh in designing a building and landscape that will capture the dignity of the office of the Presidency, while at the same time being warm and welcoming to visitors,” President George W. Bush said. “Laura and I are thrilled with the plans.”

“The building and landscape evoke elements of the full span of George and Laura Bush’s life and service, from their ranch in Crawford to the White House, and help us share the story of a couple committed to public service based on the core principles of freedom, opportunity, responsibility and compassion,” said Mark Langdale, President of the George W. Bush Presidential Library Foundation.

Artist rendering of the Bush Presidential Center“The George W. Bush Presidential Center reflects a unique design that is appropriate in representing the first U.S. President of the 21st Century,” said R. Gerald Turner, President of Southern Methodist University. “At the same time, it reflects major components of SMU’s Collegiate Georgian architectural tradition of nearly 100 years. As a modern expression of our heritage, this facility will be a welcome addition to the stately buildings and grounds that make the SMU campus a special place for learning,” Turner said.

The building and landscape are designed to achieve LEED platinum certification and include numerous sustainable design strategies, including locally sourced building materials (several types of Texas limestone, stained pecan interior paneling), 20 percent recycled materials, solar hot water panels, native landscaping to reduce irrigation and a storm-water management system that conveys, cleanses and collects surface runoff and roof rainwater, and will provide 50 percent of the irrigation needed for the site.

The building and landscape are integrated, with numerous links between indoor and outdoor spaces. Visitors to the museum will enter the building through Freedom Hall, a large, light-filled open space that will tie the different aspects of the museum experience together. On one side of Freedom Hall, visitors will be able to tour the Museum’s permanent exhibit, which will include a replica of the Oval Office as it was during President Bush’s tenure, complete with an outdoor Texas Rose Garden that mimics the proportion and scale of the White House Rose Garden. The Museum will tell the story of the presidency by examining key decisions and the core principles that defined President Bush’s service: freedom, opportunity, responsibility and compassion.

The opposite side of Freedom Hall will house the temporary exhibit space, a ceremonial courtyard and a café. The Institute portion of the building will include a conference center with a 364-seat auditorium with simultaneous translation and broadcast capabilities, along with numerous offices for scholars and a presidential suite for receptions and other functions. The Institute will have its own entrance on axis with Binkley Avenue. The Archives will be the home for the official documents and artifacts of the Bush administration, where they will be presented to the public for study and discussion.

The landscape will be an attraction in and of itself, with seasonable displays in the wildflower meadow, large tree-shaded lawns for sitting, picnicking or playing, numerous gardens and courtyards, tall grass prairie with seasonal wildflowers, and savannah and woodland clearings that provide a range of native habitat for butterflies, birds and other wildlife species.

The landscape will function as an urban park that will engage a broad range of users, including library and special event visitors, SMU students, faculty and staff and the University Park community. It provides numerous spaces for events and gatherings, including performances in the outdoor amphitheater and intramural sports on the west lawn.

Robert A.M. Stern Architects, LLP, is a 220-person firm of architects, interior designers, and supporting staff. The firm is dedicated to the idea that architecture must engage in a conversation across time, connecting the present and future with the past. Robert A.M. Stern Architects brings to the design of the George W. Bush Presidential Center significant experience with the planning and design of museums that present a contemporary architectural response to the legacy of an important American cultural figure, including the Norman Rockwell Museum at Stockbridge, Massachusetts; the Roger Tory Peterson Institute in Jamestown, New York; and the Museum Center at the Mark Twain House & Museum in Hartford, Connecticut. Stern, practicing architect, teacher, and writer, is Dean of the Yale School of Architecture. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, and received the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Medal from the Municipal Art Society of New York in 2009 and the tenth Vincent Scully Prize from the National Building Museum in 2008. In 2007 he received both the Athena Award from the Congress for the New Urbanism and the Board of Directors’ Honor from the Institute of Classical Architecture and Classical America. Joining Mr. Stern in the design effort were partners Augusta Barone, Alexander P. Lamis, and Graham S. Wyatt, and project architect Jim Pearson.

Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Inc., Landscape Architects (MVVA) is known across North America and internationally for innovative landscapes that address contemporary social and environmental issues while also achieving, as with the George W. Bush Presidential Center, a timeless style that appeals to a broad range of the American public. Founded in 1982, MVVA has received numerous awards and previously worked with First Lady Laura Bush on the redesign of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House. Michael Van Valkenburgh was the 2003 recipient of the Smithsonian Institution’s Cooper Hewitt National Design Award for Environmental Design and is a 1988 winner of the prestigious American Academy in Rome Prize. He has taught both full and part time at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design since 1982. The key senior staff members working on the Library with Michael are firm Principals, Laura Solano and Matthew Urbanski, and Herb Sweeney, Associate and Project Manager.

Mrs. Laura W. Bush chaired the design committee for the Bush Presidential Center. Members of the committee included: Roland Betts, Founder and Chairman of Chelsea Piers, L.P.; The Honorable Mark Langdale, President, George W. Bush Foundation; Deedie Rose, Philanthropist; Witold Rybczynski, Martin & Margy Meyerson Professor of Urbanism and Professor of Real Estate, University of Pennsylvania; Sidney J. Sanders, Vice President, Facilities and Construction, The Methodist Hospital System; and R. Gerald Turner, President, Southern Methodist University.

The Presidential Center will be located at Southern Methodist University, five miles north of downtown Dallas. It will occupy a 23.11-acre site on the main campus, near the corner of SMU Boulevard and North Central Expressway (U.S. Highway 75). The site is near a light rail station.


Find more links and media coverage from SMU News
Learn more about LEED certification from the U.S. Green Building Council
Visit the George W. Bush Presidential Center website

Former President Bush defines focus of new institute

Laura and George W. BushFormer President George W. Bush told an SMU audience Nov. 12 that the George W. Bush Institute will focus on education, global health, human freedom and economic growth. The Institute will be part of the Bush Presidential Center, which will include the presidential library and museum.

Construction on the center will begin in fall 2010, but the institute’s first initiatives are under way with the selection of key leaders and plans for conferences beginning this spring.

“The Institute will be a vital hub of critical thought and practical action,” Bush told about 1,500 SMU faculty, students, staff and presidential library donors at McFarlin Auditorium. “It will be independent, nonpartisan and designed to make an impact in the world.”

The Institute first will focus on education reform, beginning with the appointment of nationally renowned education scholar James Guthrie to serve as the institute’s director of education policy studies; he will serve as senior fellow at the institute. Simultaneously, SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development announced that he will hold a concurrent appointment as professor in the school, the first such appointment to be made between SMU and the Bush Institute.

Guthrie is currently Patricia and Rodes Hart Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy and director of the Peabody Center for Education Policy at Vanderbilt University. He joins the Institute and the University on Jan. 1, 2010

Sandy Kress, national education leader and former Dallas Independent School District board chair, also will serve as education fellow at the Institute, directing education policy development and outreach.

Guthrie and Kress will lead a national education conference in March 2010 on education leadership, policy and school reform.

In addition, as part of the Bush Institute’s focus on economic growth, including energy independence, the institute will partner with the Maguire Energy Institute in Cox School of Business to host an April 2010 conference focused on the benefits of natural gas production in the United States.

In the area of global health, Bush announced the appointment of Ambassador Mark Dybul, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator from 2006 to 2009, as the institute’s first global health fellow. Dr. Dybul will retain his position as distinguished scholar at Georgetown University. In both capacities he will research strategies to provide comprehensive health services to mothers, newborns and children in impoverished African and Asian countries.

“This is an area where research is urgently needed,” Bush said. “I’ve charged Mark with saving as many lives as quickly as possible.”

The institute will support human freedom with the creation of the Freedom Collection, a repository of video, oral and written histories documenting freedom movements around the world. The collection will serve as a resource for scholars, activists and policymakers interested in studying the advance of human liberty, Bush said.

“With the Freedom Collection, we will continue our legacy of supporting advocates for freedom around the world,” Bush said.

Oscar Morales Guevara will serve as the institute’s fellow in human freedom. He launched an international Internet movement in 2008 with fellow Colombians against the narco-terrorist network known as FARC.

Within all four areas of focus, the Bush Institute will integrate the involvement of women and social entrepreneurs. In remarks following those of her husband, former First Lady Laura Bush, who will lead the institute’s women’s initiative, said, “Research shows that when you educate and empower women, you improve nearly every aspect of society.”

The Institute will be home to the U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council, which will focus on literacy efforts at early- and adult-education levels for women in the United States and Afghanistan. The council plans a March conference on Afghan literacy.

“Education, global health, freedom and economic growth are areas that have been important to President and Mrs. Bush since President Bush first sought office as governor and then president,” said Mark Langdale, president of the George W. Bush Foundation Board of Directors. “The purpose of the institute is to expand on these principles.”

Bush ended by pledging that “together, the Bush Presidential Center and SMU will help this campus continue to grow as a great university. We will be a constructive member of a vibrant Dallas community. And we will contribute to the national dialogue in a positive way for years to come. We are proud to call SMU home.”

Read more from SMU News
Watch the video from the Nov. 12 announcement video
Visit the official George W. Bush Presidential Center website

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