Bush Library

‘Oscar de la Renta: Five Decades of Style’ comes to an end Oct. 5, 2014 at the Bush Center

Photo by Terri Glanger for the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

Photo by Terri Glanger for the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

After three months as a special exhibit at The George W. Bush Presidential Center“Oscar de la Renta: Five Decades of Style” comes to an end Sunday, Oct. 5.

The exhibition is a major retrospective of the legendary American fashion designer. Offering Dallas the opportunity to experience fashion first-hand, the exhibit explores de la Renta’s remarkable career from its origins to its most recent masterpieces.

Photo by Terri Glanger for the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

Photo by Terri Glanger for the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

Featuring more than 60 outfits, the exhibit highlights de la Renta’s designs for three First Ladies: Nancy Reagan, Hilary Clinton and Laura Bush. As the coutourier’s ensembles changed with the times, his designs offer insight into the unique role of the First Lady as our country’s official hostess to world leaders and trendsetter in style, fashion and entertaining.

When thinking about the various personal styles and eras of each First Lady, its hard to imagine how one designer could have dressed each so beautifully. Yet through each differing fashion period, de la Renta created just the right look for the President’s wife.

“Oscar de la Renta is a successful designer because he is always Oscar,” says Chelsea Bell, professor in the Division of Journalism’s Fashion Media Program in SMU’s Meadows School of the Arts. “His designs for each of the First Ladies were specific to their tastes and personalities, yet they all exuded the aesthetic of [his] design style. Great designers are able to capture the needs and personalities of their clients while still maintaing the design sensibilities that define their work.”

The exhibit also features de la Renta’s Spanish and garden inspirations, as well as his use of motifs and silhouettes from cultures around the globe. Highlighting the craftsmanship that goes into the creation of couture clothing, other sections detail his work for stars of stage, screen and high society.

SMU faculty, staff and students receive free admission to the Bush Center with their SMU IDs. The exhibit is open Monday-Saturday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., as well as Sunday 12-5 p.m.

> For additional details and images visit the Bush Center’s “Oscar de la Renta: Five Decades of Style” homepage

Bush Center celebrates Oscar de la Renta with “Five Decades of Style” through Oct. 5, 2014

Bush Center Oscar de la Renta exhibit, 'Five Decades of Style'

Photo credit: The George W. Bush Presidential Center

The George W. Bush Presidential Center is hosting a major retrospective of American fashion designer Oscar de la Renta, from his earliest work to his most recent runway masterpieces.

Oscar de la Renta: Five Decades of Style” features several of the designer’s styles for Nancy Reagan, Hillary Clinton and Laura Bush (’68) – offering a unique look at the First Lady’s role as the nation’s official hostess and style ambassador. Also featured are outfits worn by members of First Families, including Jenna Bush’s wedding dress.

The exhibit also focuses on de la Renta’s Spanish and garden inspirations, as well as his use of motifs and silhouettes from cultures around the globe. Other sections detail his red-carpet work for stars of stage, screen and high society, and highlight the craftsmanship that goes into the creation of couture clothing.

SMU faculty, staff and students receive free admission to the Bush Center with their University IDs. The De la Renta exhibit runs through Sunday, Oct. 5, 2014.

> Find more details and images at the Bush Center’s “Oscar de la Renta: Five Decades of Style” homepage

Campus celebrates Veterans Day 2013

SMU Veterans pinVeterans Day 2013 is Monday, Nov. 11, and SMU will honor its military vets in many ways this week:

• SMU’s Maguire Center for Ethics and Public Responsibility will present SMU Veteran lapel pins to all University vets – students, faculty and staff – to recognize their service and identify their membership with the University’s veteran community. The Maguire Center will present pins 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Monday, Nov. 11 at the Main Quad flagpole. In addition, Ruthie’s Rolling Café will offer free sandwiches to vets wearing their pins.

• The George W. Bush Presidential Library and Museum will offer free admission to all veterans, retirees, active duty, National Guard, Reserve, and Coast Guard service members on Veterans Day. The Museum is open 9 a.m.-5 p.m. on Veterans Day 2013; the offer is good for all tickets sold at the admissions desk that day, but not applicable to tickets sold online. Any service member participating in the free admission offer will be asked to show a form of identification upon purchasing their tickets. For more information, e-mail bush43media@nara.gov.

• The Office of the Provost hosts a luncheon honoring veterans 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 14 in the Martha Proctor Mack Grand Ballroom, Umphrey Lee Center. The keynote speaker is U.S. Army Col. Miguel Howe (Ret.), director of the Military Service Initiative in the George W. Bush Presidential Center. Special presentations will also be made by:

  • SMU Provost and Vice President for Academic Affairs Paul Ludden
  • University Chief Information Officer Joe Gargiulo (U.S. Navy 1975-77, U.S. Navy Reserve 1978-80)
  • SMU Chief of Police Richard Shafer (U.S. Air Force 1973-94)
  • SMU Color Guard
  • Associate Vice President for Campus Services Julie Wiksten ’78, ’92
  • Brandon Montgomery ’14, president, U.S. Military Veterans of SMU (U.S. Marine Corps 2005-10)
  • Blake Helm ’14 (M.B.A.), vice president, Cox Veterans in Business (U.S. Army, 2005-12)

• In addition, the Office of the Provost and SMU Military Veterans are collecting holiday toys and care package items during the luncheon. Please bring a new unwrapped toy for the U.S. Marine Corps Reserve’s Toys For Tots program and personal items for active-duty U.S. military service members. Visit the United Service Organizations (USO) website for a list of suggested care package items.

• SMU’s Central University Libraries invite you to view one of DeGolyer Library’s finest collections in digitized form: the Melvin C. Shaffer World War II Photographs. Shaffer’s evocative images depict the indigenous populations and local conditions of North Africa, Italy, Southern France, and Germany from 1943 to 1945. Included are 19 images of Mount Vesuvius that depict the volcano before, during and after its eruption in 1944.

SMU prepares for Bush Presidential Center opening

Bush Center welcome graphicSMU is preparing to celebrate the opening of the George W. Bush Presidential Center and welcome the worldwide visitors who will attend dedication events on campus April 24-26, 2013. The Bush Center, located on a 23-acre site on the east side of campus, houses the Presidential Library and Museum and the George W. Bush Institute. The Library and Museum will open to the public Wednesday, May 1.

Due to space limitations, attendance at the dedication ceremony planned by the Bush Center Thursday, April 25 is by invitation only. The invited guests expected to attend include President Barack Obama and former presidents George H.W. Bush, Jimmy Carter and Bill Clinton, along with other government officials from the administration of George W. Bush.

The ceremony will be streamed at BushCenter.org. Residents of University Park and Highland Park also can view the ceremonies on SMU-TV, Channel 19.

> Visit the George W. Bush Presidential Center website

Although dedication events will bring a large number of special visitors to campus, SMU will remain open so that teaching will continue uninterrupted. To accommodate class attendance, alternative transportation and parking plans are available at smu.edu/wheretopark. Faculty, staff and students with parking questions may e-mail parking@smu.edu or call 214-768-7275.

“While classes will continue as normal, the entire SMU family should expect that our routines will be altered temporarily,” said Brad Cheves, vice president for development and external affairs. “We are honored to be serving in a hospitality role for this once-in-a-lifetime event and to welcoming visitors to campus who ordinarily would not become familiar with SMU. We are looking forward to showing what makes our University special and a fitting location for the historical resources of the Bush Presidential Center.”

Events for students, faculty and staff include:

April 25: Watch a simulcast of the Dedication Ceremony
The SMU community will have the opportunity to watch a simulcast of the formal dedication ceremony at McFarlin Auditorium (SMU ID required). Doors open at 9 a.m. Faculty, staff and students should register here. An outdoor Jumbotron north of University Boulevard, near the Dedman Life Sciences Building and the Late Fountain, also will show the proceedings. Faculty, staff and students also may watch the dedication at 9 a.m. CDT online at bushcenter.org or on Park Cities Cable Channel 19.

April 25: SMU Boulevard Block Party
During the evening of April 25, students, faculty and staff have been invited to attend the SMU Boulevard Block Party and Lighting of Freedom Hall. If you registered for the block party, you must pick up your tickets in advance at the Hughes-Trigg Mane Desk at any of the times noted below. The first 500 students to pick up their tickets will receive commemorative Croakies; the first 1,000 people to pick up their tickets will receive a commemorative T-shirt.

  • Monday, April 22: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Tuesday, April 23: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Wednesday, April 24: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. and 4 p.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Thursday, April 25: 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

April 29: SMU Day at the Bush Presidential Center
April 29 is a special preview day at the Bush Presidential Library and Museum for SMU faculty, staff and students. All available spaces have been taken. Visit smu.edu/smuday for more information.

Please note that SMU IDs are needed for SMU students, faculty and staff to enter events during the week of the Bush Center dedication.

Please send parking questions to parking@smu.edu and other questions to bushdedication@smu.edu.

> Find more information on the George W. Bush Presidential Center opening

Tune In: SMU welcomes the Bush Library on Founders’ Day 2013

The 43rd president of the United States was the unadvertised guest of honor Friday, April 19, 2013 at an outdoor ceremony welcoming the George W. Bush Presidential Center to campus. More than 3,000 SMU alumni, students, faculty and staff cheered and waved as Bush strode to the speaker’s platform and later expressed his thanks to the University.

“Laura, SMU class of 1968, and I are thrilled with our association with Southern Methodist University,” Bush said. “We had high expectations about the collaborative effort and the joint programs. Those expectations have been exceeded in a very short period of time.”

SMU is preparing to welcome the worldwide visitors who will attend dedication of the George W. Bush Presidential Center events on campus April 24-26. Click the YouTube screen to watch the welcome event video, or visit this link to open video of SMU’s welcome ceremony for the Bush Presidential Center in a new windowvideo

> Read more about the welcome event from SMU News
> Find complete information (parking, traffic and more) on the Bush Library opening

Laura Bush unveils plans for Presidential Center

Laura Bush with Bush Presidential Center modelFormer First Lady Laura Bush visited the SMU campus Nov. 18 to unveil architectural and landscaping designs for the George W. Bush Presidential Center. The following account comes courtesy of The George W. Bush Presidential Center:


DALLAS–Mrs. Laura W. Bush, Architect Robert A. M. Stern and Landscape Architect Matthew Urbanski today unveiled the design of the George W. Bush Presidential Center, a modern brick and limestone structure that complements the American Georgian character of the SMU campus, set within a low-maintenance, quintessentially Texas landscape.

The light-filled building is both presidential and welcoming, includes elements that evoke both Texas and Washington, and will house the three components of the George W. Bush Presidential Center: an Archive, a Museum and a policy Institute.

“I applaud the work of Robert Stern and Michael Van Valkenburgh in designing a building and landscape that will capture the dignity of the office of the Presidency, while at the same time being warm and welcoming to visitors,” President George W. Bush said. “Laura and I are thrilled with the plans.”

“The building and landscape evoke elements of the full span of George and Laura Bush’s life and service, from their ranch in Crawford to the White House, and help us share the story of a couple committed to public service based on the core principles of freedom, opportunity, responsibility and compassion,” said Mark Langdale, President of the George W. Bush Presidential Library Foundation.

Artist rendering of the Bush Presidential Center“The George W. Bush Presidential Center reflects a unique design that is appropriate in representing the first U.S. President of the 21st Century,” said R. Gerald Turner, President of Southern Methodist University. “At the same time, it reflects major components of SMU’s Collegiate Georgian architectural tradition of nearly 100 years. As a modern expression of our heritage, this facility will be a welcome addition to the stately buildings and grounds that make the SMU campus a special place for learning,” Turner said.

The building and landscape are designed to achieve LEED platinum certification and include numerous sustainable design strategies, including locally sourced building materials (several types of Texas limestone, stained pecan interior paneling), 20 percent recycled materials, solar hot water panels, native landscaping to reduce irrigation and a storm-water management system that conveys, cleanses and collects surface runoff and roof rainwater, and will provide 50 percent of the irrigation needed for the site.

The building and landscape are integrated, with numerous links between indoor and outdoor spaces. Visitors to the museum will enter the building through Freedom Hall, a large, light-filled open space that will tie the different aspects of the museum experience together. On one side of Freedom Hall, visitors will be able to tour the Museum’s permanent exhibit, which will include a replica of the Oval Office as it was during President Bush’s tenure, complete with an outdoor Texas Rose Garden that mimics the proportion and scale of the White House Rose Garden. The Museum will tell the story of the presidency by examining key decisions and the core principles that defined President Bush’s service: freedom, opportunity, responsibility and compassion.

The opposite side of Freedom Hall will house the temporary exhibit space, a ceremonial courtyard and a café. The Institute portion of the building will include a conference center with a 364-seat auditorium with simultaneous translation and broadcast capabilities, along with numerous offices for scholars and a presidential suite for receptions and other functions. The Institute will have its own entrance on axis with Binkley Avenue. The Archives will be the home for the official documents and artifacts of the Bush administration, where they will be presented to the public for study and discussion.

The landscape will be an attraction in and of itself, with seasonable displays in the wildflower meadow, large tree-shaded lawns for sitting, picnicking or playing, numerous gardens and courtyards, tall grass prairie with seasonal wildflowers, and savannah and woodland clearings that provide a range of native habitat for butterflies, birds and other wildlife species.

The landscape will function as an urban park that will engage a broad range of users, including library and special event visitors, SMU students, faculty and staff and the University Park community. It provides numerous spaces for events and gatherings, including performances in the outdoor amphitheater and intramural sports on the west lawn.

Robert A.M. Stern Architects, LLP, is a 220-person firm of architects, interior designers, and supporting staff. The firm is dedicated to the idea that architecture must engage in a conversation across time, connecting the present and future with the past. Robert A.M. Stern Architects brings to the design of the George W. Bush Presidential Center significant experience with the planning and design of museums that present a contemporary architectural response to the legacy of an important American cultural figure, including the Norman Rockwell Museum at Stockbridge, Massachusetts; the Roger Tory Peterson Institute in Jamestown, New York; and the Museum Center at the Mark Twain House & Museum in Hartford, Connecticut. Stern, practicing architect, teacher, and writer, is Dean of the Yale School of Architecture. He is a Fellow of the American Institute of Architects, and received the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis Medal from the Municipal Art Society of New York in 2009 and the tenth Vincent Scully Prize from the National Building Museum in 2008. In 2007 he received both the Athena Award from the Congress for the New Urbanism and the Board of Directors’ Honor from the Institute of Classical Architecture and Classical America. Joining Mr. Stern in the design effort were partners Augusta Barone, Alexander P. Lamis, and Graham S. Wyatt, and project architect Jim Pearson.

Michael Van Valkenburgh Associates, Inc., Landscape Architects (MVVA) is known across North America and internationally for innovative landscapes that address contemporary social and environmental issues while also achieving, as with the George W. Bush Presidential Center, a timeless style that appeals to a broad range of the American public. Founded in 1982, MVVA has received numerous awards and previously worked with First Lady Laura Bush on the redesign of Pennsylvania Avenue in front of the White House. Michael Van Valkenburgh was the 2003 recipient of the Smithsonian Institution’s Cooper Hewitt National Design Award for Environmental Design and is a 1988 winner of the prestigious American Academy in Rome Prize. He has taught both full and part time at Harvard’s Graduate School of Design since 1982. The key senior staff members working on the Library with Michael are firm Principals, Laura Solano and Matthew Urbanski, and Herb Sweeney, Associate and Project Manager.

Mrs. Laura W. Bush chaired the design committee for the Bush Presidential Center. Members of the committee included: Roland Betts, Founder and Chairman of Chelsea Piers, L.P.; The Honorable Mark Langdale, President, George W. Bush Foundation; Deedie Rose, Philanthropist; Witold Rybczynski, Martin & Margy Meyerson Professor of Urbanism and Professor of Real Estate, University of Pennsylvania; Sidney J. Sanders, Vice President, Facilities and Construction, The Methodist Hospital System; and R. Gerald Turner, President, Southern Methodist University.

The Presidential Center will be located at Southern Methodist University, five miles north of downtown Dallas. It will occupy a 23.11-acre site on the main campus, near the corner of SMU Boulevard and North Central Expressway (U.S. Highway 75). The site is near a light rail station.


Find more links and media coverage from SMU News
Learn more about LEED certification from the U.S. Green Building Council
Visit the George W. Bush Presidential Center website

Former President Bush defines focus of new institute

Laura and George W. BushFormer President George W. Bush told an SMU audience Nov. 12 that the George W. Bush Institute will focus on education, global health, human freedom and economic growth. The Institute will be part of the Bush Presidential Center, which will include the presidential library and museum.

Construction on the center will begin in fall 2010, but the institute’s first initiatives are under way with the selection of key leaders and plans for conferences beginning this spring.

“The Institute will be a vital hub of critical thought and practical action,” Bush told about 1,500 SMU faculty, students, staff and presidential library donors at McFarlin Auditorium. “It will be independent, nonpartisan and designed to make an impact in the world.”

The Institute first will focus on education reform, beginning with the appointment of nationally renowned education scholar James Guthrie to serve as the institute’s director of education policy studies; he will serve as senior fellow at the institute. Simultaneously, SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development announced that he will hold a concurrent appointment as professor in the school, the first such appointment to be made between SMU and the Bush Institute.

Guthrie is currently Patricia and Rodes Hart Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy and director of the Peabody Center for Education Policy at Vanderbilt University. He joins the Institute and the University on Jan. 1, 2010

Sandy Kress, national education leader and former Dallas Independent School District board chair, also will serve as education fellow at the Institute, directing education policy development and outreach.

Guthrie and Kress will lead a national education conference in March 2010 on education leadership, policy and school reform.

In addition, as part of the Bush Institute’s focus on economic growth, including energy independence, the institute will partner with the Maguire Energy Institute in Cox School of Business to host an April 2010 conference focused on the benefits of natural gas production in the United States.

In the area of global health, Bush announced the appointment of Ambassador Mark Dybul, U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator from 2006 to 2009, as the institute’s first global health fellow. Dr. Dybul will retain his position as distinguished scholar at Georgetown University. In both capacities he will research strategies to provide comprehensive health services to mothers, newborns and children in impoverished African and Asian countries.

“This is an area where research is urgently needed,” Bush said. “I’ve charged Mark with saving as many lives as quickly as possible.”

The institute will support human freedom with the creation of the Freedom Collection, a repository of video, oral and written histories documenting freedom movements around the world. The collection will serve as a resource for scholars, activists and policymakers interested in studying the advance of human liberty, Bush said.

“With the Freedom Collection, we will continue our legacy of supporting advocates for freedom around the world,” Bush said.

Oscar Morales Guevara will serve as the institute’s fellow in human freedom. He launched an international Internet movement in 2008 with fellow Colombians against the narco-terrorist network known as FARC.

Within all four areas of focus, the Bush Institute will integrate the involvement of women and social entrepreneurs. In remarks following those of her husband, former First Lady Laura Bush, who will lead the institute’s women’s initiative, said, “Research shows that when you educate and empower women, you improve nearly every aspect of society.”

The Institute will be home to the U.S.-Afghan Women’s Council, which will focus on literacy efforts at early- and adult-education levels for women in the United States and Afghanistan. The council plans a March conference on Afghan literacy.

“Education, global health, freedom and economic growth are areas that have been important to President and Mrs. Bush since President Bush first sought office as governor and then president,” said Mark Langdale, president of the George W. Bush Foundation Board of Directors. “The purpose of the institute is to expand on these principles.”

Bush ended by pledging that “together, the Bush Presidential Center and SMU will help this campus continue to grow as a great university. We will be a constructive member of a vibrant Dallas community. And we will contribute to the national dialogue in a positive way for years to come. We are proud to call SMU home.”

Read more from SMU News
Watch the video from the Nov. 12 announcement video
Visit the official George W. Bush Presidential Center website

Renowned education scholar joins SMU faculty, Bush Institute

James GuthrieCelebrated scholar James Guthrie will join the faculty at SMU’s Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development while serving as a Senior Fellow at the George W. Bush Institute, a think tank that is part of the George W. Bush Presidential Center to be built on the SMU campus. This is the first concurrent appointment for SMU and the Bush Institute.

At SMU Nov. 12, former President Bush announced in a speech that Guthrie will become the Bush Institute’s Director of Education Policy Studies and will direct a program of research into ways to improve the quality of school leaders, including principals and administrators.

Currently, Guthrie is Patricia and Rodes Hart Professor of Educational Leadership and Policy and Director of the Peabody Center for Education Policy at Vanderbilt University, whose education school was ranked No. 1 in the country this year by U.S. News & World Report.

“James Guthrie’s contributions to the field of education are legendary,” said David Chard, the Leon Simmons Dean of the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development. “His timely scholarship targets the obstacles that schools must overcome to provide all children access to high-quality education. His presence on our faculty will immediately shine a spotlight on SMU Simmons School’s efforts to address some of education’s most pressing challenges. Dr. Guthrie’s appointment, confirmed by a vote of our faculty, recognizes his outstanding scholarship on education policy development and the critical role of leadership in effective education.”

“The unique attribute Guthrie brings is his continual insistence on evidence-based policy, something he did long before anybody even invented a term for it,” said Eric Hanushek, Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution of Stanford University. Frederick Hess, director of Education Policy Studies at the American Enterprise Institute and executive editor of Education Next Magazine, called Guthrie one of the nation’s most eminent thinkers on questions of educational leadership, education policy and school reform.

Guthrie is the author or co-author of 20 books and more than 200 academic and professional articles. He serves as a frequent expert witness in court cases and has been a consultant for state, national and international agencies and governments. Guthrie has been selected to serve on panels of the National Academy of Sciences and is the winner of 12 awards and academic fellowships, among them the Alexander Heard Distinguished Service Professor Award at Vanderbilt University.

Guthrie was a professor for 27 years at the University of California at Berkeley, holds a B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. from Stanford University, and undertook postdoctoral study in public finance at Harvard. Guthrie was a postdoctoral fellow at Oxford Brookes College, Oxford, England, and the Irving R. Melbo Visiting Professor at the University of Southern California.

His three-year appointments to both the SMU faculty and the Bush Institute begin in January 2010. Agreements signed by SMU and the Bush Foundation in February 2008 outline the stipulations for concurrent appointments – to serve on the SMU faculty, fellows must meet the same criteria that apply to appointees to other faculty positions, and their nomination must be reviewed and approved by the appropriate academic department and school.

Read more from SMU News

James K. Glassman named to head Bush Institute

The George W. Bush Foundation has announced that Ambassador James K. Glassman – a public policy scholar, diplomat and journalist – will be the founding executive director of the George W. Bush Institute. The Institute will be part of the George W. Bush Presidential Center.

Read the complete press release from the George W. Bush Foundation (PDF format)

By | 2009-09-09T10:09:06+00:00 September 9, 2009|Categories: News|Tags: , |

Tune In: Former President Bush talks to journalism students

George W. Bush visits SMU journalism classFormer President George W. Bush had lunch with President’s and Hunt Scholars and addressed a class of journalism students during an April 29 visit to the SMU campus. “I was trying to impart some knowledge,” Bush told SMU Daily Mustang reporter and student Shelly Smith as he came out of Journalism Lecturer Carolyn Barta‘s class, where he had spent more than an hour. Bush and Barta first met during his 1978 run for Congress, when she was a newspaper reporter. She invited him to talk to her class.

Read more and see a slide show from SMU News

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