Bridwell Library

Anthony Elia named Bridwell Foundation Endowed Librarian, director of Bridwell Library

Anthony Elia, Bridwell Foundation Endowed Librarian and Director of Bridwell Library, SMUAnthony Elia has been named J.S. Bridwell Foundation Endowed Librarian and director of Bridwell Library in SMU’s Perkins School of Theology, effective June 1, 2018. He succeeds retiring director Roberta Schaafsma, who has served in that role since April 2007.

Elia, director of library and educational technology at Christian Theological Seminary in Indianapolis since 2013, will be responsible for providing vision, strategic direction and operational leadership for Bridwell Library. In addition, he will promote the development of collections and oversee the library’s public service and user education efforts.

“Bridwell Library is an extraordinary institution, both in the theological library world and the greater global community of research and scholarship,” Elia said. “It is a great honor to join such an exceptional staff and inclusive community, where students, teachers, scholars, lay community members, ministers, alumnae/i, and many others are able to work with world-class collections.

“The vision for Bridwell will be a vision of partnerships, engagement, and community participation, where all will continue to feel welcome to find inspiration and spirit in their work, life, and vocations,” he said.

Elia earned a B.A. degree in religious studies from St. Lawrence University, M.A. degrees in religious studies from The Hebrew University of Jerusalem and in history of Christianity from the University of Chicago Divinity School, and the Master of Science in Library and Information Science (MSLIS) degree from the University of Illinois.

He brings significant expertise in library science and educational technology, which he has utilized in both U.S. and global contexts.  From 2010-13, he served as head Public Services Librarian at Burke Library, Columbia University, and was a lecturer in theological writing at Union Theological Seminary, both in New York City.  In addition, he has held positions at the JKM Library of McCormick Theological Seminary and Lutheran School of Theology at Chicago, the American Theological Library Association, and the Regenstein Library, University of Chicago.

The author of numerous publications, he will present “The Theology of Cybersecurity” at the June 2018 American Theological Library Association (ATLA) conference in Indianapolis.  Elia has held numerous leadership positions in his field, including membership on the Directors’ Committee of the Private Academic Library Network of Indiana (PALNI), where he also served as secretary of the Executive Committee.  He was chair/president of the New York Area Theological Library Association (NYATLA) from 2011-12 and vice-president of the Chicago Area Theological Library Association (CATLA) in 2010.  In addition, he was chair and past co-chair of the International Relations Round Table IVC Committee, American Library Association (ALA) from 2013-15.

Elia has also been awarded a number of grants, including a 2015-16 Wabash Center Grant for “Pedagogy of the Archive.”

A composer, Elia served as Composer in the Religion, Spirituality, and the Arts Seminar at Butler University and was also invited by the Indianapolis Symphony Orchestra to deliver a pre-concert lecture on Olivier Messiaen and Theology in 2016.

“Anthony Elia brings extraordinary energy and intellectual curiosity to this position,” said Perkins Dean Craig C. Hill. “In addition to his academic degrees, he has studied some twenty languages, including work in Prague, Rome, and Nairobi. Just as important, he has demonstrated the ability to forge connections between a theological library and the wider university and community.”

The J.S. Bridwell Library—among the best theological libraries in the nation—includes a full range of theological, biblical, and historical materials relating to the development of Christianity. In addition to the material available in the basic lending collection of the library, which is strong in Methodist materials, Bridwell Library contains a number of special collections that are especially valuable for the study of topics related specifically to the background, rise, development, and present status of Methodism.

With total holdings exceeding 370,000 volumes, Bridwell Library’s Special Collections contain over 50,000 printed books dating from the fifteenth to the twentieth century. Most of the printed works in these holdings, often in first and early editions, are in the fields of theology, church history, scripture, liturgy, and philosophy. Many of these editions are distinguished by fine illustration and typography, notable provenances, and historically significant bindings. Holdings also include manuscript correspondence by John Wesley and other important figures in early Methodism, archival collections of American Methodism and private presses, and a small group of Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts.

> Visit SMU’s Bridwell Library online: smu.edu/bridwell

SMU to commence $6.1 million Bridwell Library renovation

Bridwell Library, SMUSMU is announcing plans to move forward with renovation of Bridwell Library, one of the University’s most visible libraries and one of the United States’ preeminent theological libraries. Funding secured from the J.S. Bridwell Foundation is enabling the $6.1 million renovation project to move forward.

“We are very grateful to the Bridwell Foundation for partnering with SMU since the late 1940s to make Bridwell Library a center of excellence in providing services and resources for theological education and theological reflection,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “As we look forward to this next chapter in Bridwell Library’s development, we cannot overstate the critical importance of the Foundation’s ongoing vision and support to ensure the Library’s stature and quality.”

“The Foundation is pleased to be able to continue to support the vision of J. S. Bridwell and his daughter, Margaret Bridwell Bowdle, far into the future,” said Bridwell Foundation President Mac Cannedy. “They would be proud of where Bridwell Library has come since they first envisioned it, and equally pleased with the direction it will go in the future with this latest renovation.”

Planned renovations include structural improvements to the facility to allow better accessibility for patrons, especially those with wheelchairs and other special needs. Students, faculty and scholars will gain new spaces for study, research and gathering, as well as instructional areas for teaching and presentations. The library will also add new features to enhance service spaces and overall user experience.

With more than 380,000 volumes, Bridwell Library houses one of the nation’s finest research collections in theology and religious studies. Its collection of rare books and manuscripts includes more than 50,000 items dating from the 15th to the 20th centuries. Among the special collections are the Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Bible Collection and the largest collection in the United States of manuscript letters written by John Wesley.

While it primarily serves Perkins School of Theology, Bridwell Library is also the principal bibliographic resource at SMU for the fields of theology and religious studies. In addition, it is an important resource for other university programs and for the extended religious, academic and bibliographic communities.

“Bridwell Library is vital to the strength and reputation of the Perkins School. These important capital improvements will greatly benefit students, faculty, and all who utilize the library’s outstanding resources,” said Perkins Dean Craig C. Hill.

> Read the full story from SMU News

Take a last look at these 2016 SMU exhibitions before they’re gone

The Fall 2016 term is winding down, but you still have time to visit two exceptional (and free) exhibitions, which will run through Friday, Dec 16. Take a moment to enjoy them (again):

  • The State Fair of Texas, 1886-2016 – documenting 130 years of the “Great State Fair,” including vintage State Fair items such as badges, buttons and a felt cowboy hat signed in 1936 by President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s children Anna and James, as well as 60 historic photographs by Lynn Lennon. Hillcrest Foundation Exhibit Hall, Fondren Library
  • Inscribed Illuminations and Inspirations – illuminations and illustrations representing the Christian, Judaic and Islamic traditions, including items dating from the 12th to the 19th centuries from Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries, Bridwell Library

Calendar Highlights: Aug. 29, 2014

Hawaiian Bible featured at Bridwell Libary's Missionary Presses Exhibition.

Hawaiian Bible. Missionary Presses: A Bridwell Library Exhibition.

Missionary Presses: A Bridwell Library Exhibition: This exhibition highlights Bibles and other religious texts in indigenous languages published by missionary presses in the 19th century. Printed throughout the world in a variety of languages and letterforms, these translations were disseminated for local use as an integral element of conversion efforts by various denominations. The exhibition opens Friday, Aug. 29 in Bridwell Library.

Faculty Senate in session: The SMU Faculty Senate will hold its first meeting of the 2014-15 academic year 3-5 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 3 in the West Ballroom, Hughes-Trigg Student Center. Any member of the general faculty may attend.

SMU Libraries trade ‘Food For Fines’ through Dec. 20, 2013

SMU Central University Libraries' Food for Fines logoSMU’s Central University Libraries (CUL) is giving students, faculty and staff members with overdue charges an opportunity to help the community while saving some cash.

During the 2013 Food for Fines program, CUL will accept food donations for the North Texas Food Bank in return for waiving library fines.

For every donation of a can or package of nonperishable food, SMU community members will receive a $2 credit toward fines for overdue materials from Bridwell LibraryFondren Library CenterHamon Arts Library and the Institute for the Study of Earth and Man Reading Room.

Bring food donations to any of these libraries through Friday, Dec. 20, 2013.

Waiver credits do not apply to lost book replacement charges or processing fees. Credit only applies to overdue book fines currently assessed; no future credit can be applied.

Visit Central University Libraries online
Learn more about the North Texas Food Bank

Ten SMU professors receive 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships

Ten SMU faculty members have received 2013-14 Sam Taylor Fellowships from the Sam Taylor Fellowship Fund of the Division of Higher Education, United Methodist General Board of Higher Education and Ministry.

The Fellowships, funded by income from a portion of Taylor’s estate, award up to $2,000 for full-time faculty members at United Methodist-related colleges and universities in Texas. Any full-time faculty member is eligible to apply for the Fellowships, which support research “advancing the intellectual, social or religious life of Texas and the nation.”

Applications are evaluated on the significance of the project, clarity of the proposal, professional development of the applicant, value of the project to the community or nation, and the project’s sensitivity to value questions confronting higher education and society.

The winning professors for this academic year, and their projects:

• Tim Cassedy, English, Dedman College, for research at the Library of Congress for his book Language Makes the Difference, a history of ideas about language and identity at the turn of the 19th century.

• Michael Chmielewski, Psychology, Dedman College, to study the appropriateness of commonly used psychological tests and measures for diverse populations.

• Michael Corris, Art, Meadows School of the Arts, for interviews and illustration reproductions for his book The Armchair in the Studio: The Engagement of Art and Philosophy Since the 1960s.

• Benard Cummings, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, for a theatre adaptation of Babette’s Feast set during the Civil War.

• Kate Engel, Religious Studies, Dedman College, for archival research in Great Britain and Germany on international Protestantism at the time of the American Revolution.

• Blake Hackler, Theatre, Meadows School of the Arts, to take part in advanced training with the SITI Theatre ensemble and conduct research on embodied actor training methodologies.

• Andrea Meltzer, Psychology, Dedman College,  for a study of newlywed couples and weight-maintenance motivations.

• Lisa Pon, Art History, Meadows School of the Arts, to support reproduction of images for her upcoming book on the Madonna of the Fire.

• Candace Walkington, Teaching and Learning, Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, to build a website containing mathematics problems that are personalized to middle and high school students’ interests.

• Eric White, Special Collections, Bridwell Library, to complete the first comprehensive documentary history of every surviving copy of the Gutenberg Bible, encompassing their discovery, changing ownership and rise in cultural significance.

SMU Board of Trustees raises campaign goal to $1 billion

Bolstered by the success to date of SMU’s Second Century Campaign, the University’s Board of Trustees has raised the goal from $750 million to $1 billion.

At its quarterly meeting Friday, Sept. 13, the board voted unanimously to accept the new goal recommended by the campaign’s leadership.

The campaign seeks additional funds for scholarships, academic programs, faculty positions and campus improvements and facilities.

SMU already has surpassed its original goal and timetable, raising $780 million for a campaign scheduled to end in 2015, the 100th anniversary of the University’s opening. That date is now set to mark another milestone – the completion of SMU’s first $1 billion campaign.

SMU will join only 12 other private universities currently seeking goals of $1 billion or more. Among them are Columbia, Duke, Johns Hopkins, Georgetown, the University of Chicago and the University of Southern California. SMU is the first comprehensive university in North Texas to seek that amount.

“The generosity of our donors, the strength of our campaign leadership and the hard work of volunteers around the globe have resulted in record-breaking support for SMU,” said SMU President R. Gerald Turner. “Even during uncertain economic times, our donors kept the momentum of the campaign going. They did not skip a beat in continuing to fund SMU’s rise in quality and reputation.”

Gerald J. Ford, trustee and convening co-chair of the campaign, said, “The notable investment made in SMU through the campaign demonstrates the University’s positive trajectory and unprecedented momentum. Raising and achieving the campaign goal is the next logical step for SMU as it expands its national and global impact.”

“Adding to SMU’s momentum during its Centennial era, 2011-2015, is the opening of the George W. Bush Presidential Library, Museum and Institute,” Turner said. “This resource has attracted joint programming, concurrent appointments of SMU faculty and Bush fellows, visiting dignitaries, heightened visibility and more than 206,000 visitors to campus thus far. The support attracted by this resource has already been a tremendous benefit to the campus, city and nation.”

The funding campaign for the Bush Center, conducted by the Bush Foundation, proceeded separately from SMU’s Second Century Campaign, although at the same time. The Bush funding campaign raised more than $500 million for construction, programming and endowment for the Bush Center. “The campaigns have been synergistic, achieving mutual success,” Turner said.

Read about the $1 billion campaign goal in The Dallas Morning News.

Important SMU Priorities

Raising the campaign goal to $1 billion will provide gifts to fund additional scholarships, endowed faculty positions, academic programs and campus life enhancements, including new facilities.

Faculty and academic leadership positions targeted for endowments include those in areas such as entrepreneurship, biostatistics, science and technology law, the impact of the arts on communities, art history, theological studies and library support.

Academic programs earmarked for new endowments and operational support represent areas of growing importance to the region and nation, among them programs in energy management, public policy, interdisciplinary studies, cyber security, arts research and K-12 school leadership.

Increased scholarship funding is being sought to support top undergraduate and graduate students throughout the University. These resources will ensure that SMU can educate the next generation of leaders in areas such as the arts, sciences, business and engineering, disciplines that, with others, are critical to the future of Dallas.

Capital projects for academics include the renovation of Fondren Library Center in Central University Libraries and Bridwell Library in Perkins School of Theology. In addition, funding is being sought for new campus facilities, such as the Residential Commons complex and the Mustang Band Hall, now under construction. The campaign also seeks to complete funding for renovation and expansion of Moody Coliseum and construction of new complexes for tennis, golf and other sports, along with operational support for athletics.

SMU Board of Trustees chair and campaign co-chair Caren Prothro emphasized the case for going forward with a new goal: “The campaign has achieved remarkable results that can be seen in our impressive gains throughout the University, but its momentum tells us that much more can be accomplished. On behalf of the students we seek to serve and the faculty who help to shape their futures, we need additional resources for scholarships to attract the best among them and continue to increase our diversity. We need to recruit and retain faculty devoted to teaching, research and creativity with an impact on their disciplines and society. We want to establish and support new academic programs that will prepare students for leadership in their professions and communities. And we must provide the best facilities for these endeavors in a living-learning environment that is second to none.”

To Mike Boone, chair-elect of the SMU Board of Trustees, the University stands at a crossroads of opportunity and is ready to take a bold step forward. “At critical times in Dallas’ history, the city has been transformed by decisions that resulted in world-class assets for our community. Among these are an airport that serves as a global hub, a thriving arts district, a distinguished medical school producing Nobel laureates and a vibrant business community. Our new campaign goal signals the unequivocal commitment to join the list of milestones that have changed our community and its impact on the world.”

Results and Impact

To date, the campaign has raised funds for 472 new scholarships; 24 academic programs such as new schools, institutes and centers; 34 endowed faculty positions, bringing SMU’s total to 96 out of a goal of 100; and 26 capital projects, including new or expanded facilities for libraries, academic programs and athletics.

Many of the new academic programs SMU has created have direct impact on the Dallas region, such as new centers for legal services and financial studies. Schools recently endowed are the Bobby B. Lyle School of Engineering and the Annette Caldwell Simmons School of Education and Human Development, which focuses on school reform and programs for community impact. Other programs contribute to research and dialogue on important national and international issues, such as the Scholars Program of the John G. Tower Center for Political Studies, focusing on public policy and service, and the Embrey Human Rights Program. Still other resources, among them expanded acquisitions for the Meadows Museum and a new National Center for Arts Research, broaden the city’s reputation in the arts internationally.

In another measure of impact and rising quality, the average SAT score of entering students has risen from 1144 in 1999 to 1302 in 2013, thanks to increasing resources for scholarships.

“These resources bring outstanding students to Dallas and help to keep our bright local students in our region, all of which enriches the talent pool here,” said Carl Sewell, trustee and campaign co-chair. “Funding for new academic positions has enabled us to attract and retain scholars from throughout the world. Professors named to endowed chairs are distinguished scholars at the top of their careers and reputations,” he added. “They bring important research projects and work not only with graduate students, but also with undergraduates, mentoring them and involving them in their research.”

Ray L. Hunt, trustee and campaign co-chair, notes that increased academic resources “enable SMU to be nimble in creating new programs in emerging fields.” Examples include centers in alternative asset management, engineering leadership, and global markets and freedom. “Access to these programs will help our graduates to compete and lead in key areas where new expertise and perspectives are needed and will increase their contributions to critical areas for our nation and the world.”

As SMU changes with the impact of the campaign, “the community will be better served and Dallas will have the distinguished university it deserves,” said Mike Boone. “Regional leaders know that as SMU rises as a center of ideas, knowledge and service, our region will be strengthened as a global center of commerce and culture. Campaign resources have strengthened not only the University, but also the economic vitality of the region,” he said. “SMU is both an indicator and a predictor of success for Dallas and our region. We will continue to prosper together.”

Campaign Participation and Leadership

Thus far 58,159 donors have made one or more gifts to the campaign. This includes 279 who have given $100,000 or more, and 123 who have committed $1 million or more, an all-time high for SMU.

SMU’s campaign goals also include giving levels among alumni. The campaign seeks gifts from 25 percent of alumni each year and from 50 percent over the course of the campaign. Thus far more than 50 percent of SMU alumni have made one or more gifts during the campaign. A record 24 percent of alumni provided gifts in the fiscal year ending May 31, 2013, representing the highest number of alumni ever to give to SMU in a single year.

“The concept of a billion dollars may seem overwhelming, but the fact is that it will take gifts of all sizes for us to meet our new goal,” said Ruth Collins Sharp Altshuler, a trustee and campaign co-chair. “So we’re asking our alumni to take part at any level they can afford. It all counts, and it all makes a difference. Together, we are living up to the theme of our campaign, SMU Unbridled.”

The Second Century Campaign is led by five co-chairs: Convening co-chair Gerald J. Ford, with Ruth Altshuler, Ray L. Hunt, Caren H. Prothro and Carl Sewell. They lead a 15-member Campaign Executive Council and nearly 40 Steering Committee co-chairs spearheading various fundraising efforts, such as those for each school, the libraries, athletics and student life. Regional campaigns range from New York to Los Angeles and from Mexico City to Hong Kong. Campaign committee members total more than 350 worldwide, and hundreds of others are providing volunteer support.

Calendar Highlights: Fall 2013 exhibits at SMU

As the school year kicks off, be sure to make time for the five exhibitions at SMU this semester.

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Image c/o Meadows*

The Stewart Album: Art, Letters, and Souvenirs to an American Patron in Paris 

The Meadows Museum presents their recent acquisition of an “album for cartes de visite” compiled by William H. Stewart. The vast collection of artwork, photographs and letters gives insight into not only Stewart but other important Spanish artists of the modern era. The exhibit runs through Sunday, Nov. 10, 2013 and is free for SMU faculty, staff and students.

Photographs from Taos, New Mexico by Debora Hunter 

SMU Associate Professor of Art Debora Hunter has photographed the cultural landscape of Taos for the past 10 years, focusing her work on the question of man versus nature. Her Photographs from Taos, New Mexico are on display through Saturday, Oct. 12, 2013 in the Pollock Gallery, Hughes-Trigg Student Center. The exhibit is free. Hunter will also host gallery talks at noon Wednesday, Sept. 18 and 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 21. Both special events will detail the photographs in relation to consumer culture and the diminishing natural resources.

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Post Chiaroscuro: Prints in Color After the Renaissance 

This exhibit features artwork that “explores how color prints were made after the 16th century, when the technique known as chiaroscuro woodcut had been developed.” Specifically, there are three main printing techniques detailed in the exhibit: intaglio, relief and planographic. The Post Chiaroscuro exhibit is curated by Samantha Robinson, a second-year M.A. student in art history, and runs from Monday, Sept. 16-Friday, Dec. 13, 2013. The exhibit can be found in the Hawn Gallery of the Hamon Arts Library, Owen Arts Center, and is free and open to the public.

Manuscripts in the Islamic Tradition 

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Bridwell Library presents a collection of sacred texts in a new entry hall exhibition, Manuscripts in the Islamic Tradition. The show features manuscripts of the Quran and Dala’il al-Khayrat. All the manuscripts showcase detailed craftsmanship including calligraphy, painting and outstanding colors. The exhibit runs through Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013 with free entry to the public.

Fifty Women 

Bridwell Library will showcase Fifty Women in the Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries through Thursday, Dec. 12, 2013. More than 50 books will be featured, dating from the Middle Ages to the beginning of the 20th century. All books were written, produced, owned or inspired by women, and the roles that women held – saints, queens, authors, artists, mothers.

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*Selection of Pages from The Stewart Album, 2nd Half of the 19th Century, Meadows Museum, SMU, Dallas. Museum Purchase Thanks to a Gift from The Eugene McDermott Foundation and Ms. Jo Ann Geurin Thetford

Calendar Highlights: Closing attractions for Commencement 2013

As the spring semester comes to an end and SMU celebrates its 98th commencement, don’t forget to visit the exhibitions on campus. Two are coming to a close, and you will want to see them before they’re gone:

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The First Four Centuries of Printed Bible Illustration 

This exhibition includes 50 bibles from Bridwell Library’s Special Collections that span from the beginning of the printed page to the 19th century. The exhibit focuses on the historical context, artistic development and cultural impact of the illustrations found in these scriptures. The First Four Centuries of Printed Bible Illustration will be on view in the Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries until Saturday, May 18.

Bachelor of Fine Arts Qualifying Exhibition 

The annual spring exhibition of graduating Division of Art seniors will be on display in the Pollock Gallery in Hughes-Trigg Student Center until Saturday, May 18, featuring a wide range of styles and media. Call 214-768-4439 for more information.

Linda DarnellLinda Darnell: From Dallas to Hollywood

This retrospective of Oak Cliff native Darnell’s acting career features selections from the Jeff Gordon Collection. It has been held over through Friday, June 7 in the Hawn Gallery, Hamon Arts Library.

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Impressions of Europe: 19th-Century Vistas by Martín Rico 

SMU’s Meadows Museum, in collaboration with the Prado Museum, presents the only American appearance of this exhibition spanning the career of renowned Spanish landscape painter Martín Rico y Ortega. The show has been held over through Sunday, July 7 in the Virginia Meadows Galleries. Admission is free for SMU faculty, staff and students with University ID.

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 13, 2012

Graphic poetry: Together the Meadows Museum and Bridwell Library acquired a copy of Picasso’s Vingt Poëmes. This is one of fifteen deluxe copies of the book itself and features 20 sonnets by famed Spanish poet Luis de Góngora y Argote; complementing the sonnets are 19 full-page etched female heads. The artist’s book is available for viewing in the Meadows Museum Sept. 16, 2012  Jan. 13, 2013. This exhibit is free for students, faculty and staff.

Rock the vote: Join SMU as we celebrate the U.S. Constitution in the Hughes-Trigg Student Center Commons 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 18. Participants will have the opportunity to win prizes for their Constitution knowledge as well as register to vote for the 2012 Presidential election Nov. 6. Don’t miss this opportunity – remember, every vote counts! For more information, contact Lisa O’Donnell or 214-768-9206.

Bon voyage: If the travel bug has bitten your students, remind them to stop by the SMU Abroad Fair. SMU offers 148 study abroad programs in 50 countries. At the fair, students can find out the requirements for study abroad and hear from past abroad students about their experiences. Travel to the Owen Arts Center Lobby from 11 a.m. -1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 19 for all the information.

Local borders: Join Anthony Mora, associate professor of history, American culture, and Latina/o studies at the University of Michigan, as he discusses the New Mexican towns Las Cruces and La Mesilla, and how they shaped Mexicans’ historic role in the United States. Las Cruces was built north of the border while La Mesilla was built south of the border, creating conflicting views of the relations of race and nation. This topic is the focus of his recent book, Border Dilemmas: Racial and National Uncertainties in New Mexico, 1848-1912. His lecture, “Local Borders: Two Towns and the Making of the U.S.-Mexico Boundary,” will be held 6-8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 20, 2012,  in DeGolyer Library. and is presented by SMU’s Clements Center for Southwest Studies. It’s free and open to the public.

Sweet symphony: The 2012-13 season of the Meadows Symphony Orchestra opens Friday, Sept. 21, with 19th- and 20th-century works. The program includes Symphony No. 1: Holocaust by Simon Sargon, Meadows professor of composition, with guest artist Kelly Markgraf, noted American baritone. Performances begin at 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 21 and at 3 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 23 in Caruth Auditorium. Tickets are $7 for students, faculty and staff. Call 214-768-2787 (214-SMU-ARTS for more information. (Below, photo courtesy Meadows School of the Arts.)

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