New DeGolyer Library exhibit features rare Civil War photographs

Anne Peterson

New DeGolyer Library exhibit features rare Civil War photographs

Pontoon Bridge over Rio Grande River at Brownsville.

Pontoon Bridge over Rio Grande River at Brownsville, ca. 1866, Louis de Planque (attributed) Robin Stanford Collection. View facing Levee Street in Brownsville during Federal occupation. African American soldier from 114th U.S. Colored Troops in the foreground.

A new exhibit at SMU’s DeGolyer Library features rare Civil War images of African American slave life, Southern battlefield scenes and camp life for Union and Confederate soldiers.

“The Civil War in Photographs: New Perspectives from the Robin Stanford Collection” (through March 15, 2013) represents the first time the more than 300 photographs and stereoscope views have been exhibited.

Robin Stanford of Houston has spent the last 40 years assembling the collection. Its strengths include pre-war and wartime Southern views by local photographers and views by northern photographers who documented Union-occupied areas of the South. Her collection also includes images of the daily life of soldiers at mealtime, playing cards and writing letters. Extremely rare Texas Civil War images also are included.

The highlights include:

  • Pre-war slave life with photographs of slave quarters, workshops and plantation life.
  • Images of a damaged Ft. Sumter, South Carolina, after Union troops surrendered and evacuated in 1861.
  • Battlegrounds and scenes rarely photographed, particularly in Southern locations such as Georgia, Tennessee, Mississippi and Louisiana.
  • African American soldiers and regiments.
  • Union soldiers in Brownsville, Texas, guarding the U.S. border.

The exhibit is free and open to the public. Library hours are from 8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday.

A 95-page catalog of the exhibit, The Civil War in Photographs: New Perspectives from the Robin Stanford Collection, is available for $20. The catalog was created by exhibit curator Anne Peterson.

For more information, visit the DeGolyer Library homepage or call 214-768-2253.

Written by Nancy George

> See more photos from the exhibit at SMU News

February 12, 2013|Calendar Highlights, News|

Calendar Highlights: Sept. 27, 2007

Meadows dance studentsWhat’s opera, doc? The Meadows Opera Theatre presents scenes and songs from opera and musical theatre in a brown bag event, “Opera Free For All,” at 1 p.m. Sept. 28 in the Taubman Atrium, Owen Arts Center.

Sounds of Spain: The Orchestra of New Spain presents a concert of Renaissance music from Valencia at 5 p.m. Sept. 30 in the Virginia Meadows Galleries, Meadows Museum. Tickets are $25 each for general admission, $20 each for Meadows Museum members.

Brown Bag Dance returns: The Meadows Division of Dance (top left) presents its fall 2007 Brown Bag Dance Series at noon each day Oct. 1-5 in the Bob Hope Theatre lobby, Owen Arts Center. Bring your lunch and watch SMU dance students perform original works in ballet, jazz and modern dance.

Sophia Loren with Stanley MarcusMore Fortnight fun: DeGolyer Library Curator Anne Peterson gives an illustrated history of “The Store” in “Fortnight, Fashion and Fun: Neiman Marcus Celebrates 100 Years in Dallas” Oct. 4 in DeGolyer Library. A reception begins at 6 p.m., with the lecture at 6:30 p.m. The DeGolyer exhibition “Merchandise for the Millions: American Trade Catalogs” opens the same day and will run through Feb. 15. (Middle left, Sophia Loren and Stanley Marcus activate a recreation of the Villa D’Este fountains during the department store’s 1975 Italian Fortnight.)

Global impact: The Perkins School of Theology presents “Religion and Empire: Politics, Faith and the Future of Globalization” Oct. 4. Ulrich Duchrow, professor of systematic theology at the University of Heidelberg, will speak on “Faith Communities and Empire: Global Hope and Western Challenge” at 7 p.m. in Perkins Chapel. SMU Professor of Systematic Theology and symposium organizer Joerg Rieger will join Duchrow and scholars from SMU, TCU, Baylor, Phillips Theological Seminary and Princeton for an academic symposium on “Religion and Empire” 4-6 p.m. in the Kirby Hall parlor. All events are free and open to the public. For more information, contact Jeorg Rieger, 8-2356.

Meadows Wind EnsembleWinds and “Fire”: The Meadows Wind Ensemble (bottom left) presents “Magneticfireflies,” featuring the title music from their new CD as well as the world premiere of composer Cindy McTee’s Finish Line for wind symphony. The show begins at 8 p.m. Oct. 5 in Caruth Auditorium, Owen Arts Center. Tickets are $7 for SMU faculty, staff and students; for more information, call 8-2787 (8-ARTS).

Outdoor Adventures: Sign up by Oct. 5 for the Beaver Bend weekend canoe trip Oct. 12-14 on the Upper Mountain Fork River, Oklahoma. Cost is $70; a pre-trip meeting is scheduled for Oct. 9. For more information, visit SMU Recreational Sports or contact David Chambers, 8-9918.

September 27, 2007|Calendar Highlights|

For the Record: Aug. 30, 2007

Kamal Saggi has been invited to speak at the biennial International Association for the Protection of Intellectual Property Forum in Singapore, Oct. 4-6, 2007

Geoff Orsak, School of Engineering, has written an op-ed, “America Needs a New Formula for Success in the Sciences,” published in The Austin American-Statesman Aug. 24, 2007.

Sophia Loren and Stanley Marcus at the 1975 Italian FortnightAnne Peterson, DeGolyer Library, wrote the introduction to “Neiman Marcus: 100 Years of Style” published in the September 2007 issue of <a href="D Magazine. The tribute features photos from DeGolyer’s collections. (Right, Sophia Loren and Stanley Marcus activate a recreation of the Villa D’Este fountains during the department store’s 1975 Italian Fortnight.)

Ling Hua, Chemistry, cowrote a paper recognized by publisher Elsevier Ltd. as one of the Top 50 Most Cited Articles published in Tetrahedron: Asymmetry 2004-07. The paper, “Evaluation of substituent effects on activity and enantioselectivity in the enzymatic reduction of aryl ketones,” was published originally in Volume 16, Issue 8 (2005).

Scott MacDonald, Southwestern Graduate School of Banking, discussed bank security and the credit crisis with business columnist Pamela Yip in The Dallas Morning News Aug. 27, 2007.

Noah Simblist, Art, has been named the winner of the 2006 Moss/Chumley Artist Award. The award, which carries a cash prize of $1,500, is given annually to an outstanding North Texas artist who has exhibited professionally for at least 10 years and who has a record of community advocacy for the visual arts. Simblist was honored at a private evening reception at the Meadows Museum.

August 31, 2007|For the Record|

For the Record (Summer Edition): Aug. 17, 2007

Michael Adler, Anthropology, discussed the SMU-in-Taos program as a featured guest on KTAO 101.9 FM Radio July 24, 2007.

Al Armendariz, Environmental and Civil Engineering, wrote an op-ed, “We Can’t Wish Our Smog Away,” published in The Dallas Morning News July 25, 2007.

simpsons-cover-125.jpgAlan Brown and Chris Logan, Psychology, have edited The Psychology of the Simpsons: D’oh!, a collection of essays by professional psychologists exploring “the functions and dysfunctions of the show’s characters.” The book was published in July 2007 by Independent Publishers Group.

Steve DePaul, International Center, was featured in a Robert Miller article on SMU’s Education Abroad program in The Dallas Morning News Aug. 5, 2007.

Shubha Ghosh, Law, spoke with CBS-11 TV about the impact on consumers of a June 2007 Supreme Court ruling that struck down a nearly 100-year-old Texas ban on price fixing.

Rick Halperin, History, guided SMU students, faculty and local community members on a tour of the landmarks of apartheid in South Africa Aug. 2-12. Halperin, director of the SMU Human Rights Education Program and chair of the Amnesty International USA Board, took the group to Soweto, scene of widespread rioting in 1976; Cape Town’s District Six neighborhood, where residents were forced out of their homes to create a “whites only” zone in 1965; and the Robben Island Prison, where Nelson Mandela was held as a political prisoner for 27 years.

Kathy Hargrove, Education and Human Development, discussed how children can be taught to think like geniuses with WFAA-TV Channel 8 Aug. 14, 2007.

James Hollifield, Political Science, was a featured guest along with former U.S. Labor Secretary Robert Reich on the KERA-TV talk show “McCuistion” in a July 29, 2007 episode on “Ideology, Politics and Partisanship.”

Daniel Howard, Marketing, discussed the origins and usefulness of the “personal branding” trend with The Dallas Morning News July 15, 2007.

evan-almighty-160.jpgRobert Hunt, Theology, discussed the film “Evan Almighty” and the enduring appeal of the Noah story in the June 16, 2007 edition of The Dallas Morning News.

Jeffrey Kahn, Law, discussed with KERA 90.1 and National Public Radio the Dallas-based federal trial involving the Holy Land Foundation, a Muslim charity accused of ties to terrorism, for which jury selection began July 16, 2007.

Glenn Linden, History, has cowritten Disunion, War, Defeat and Recovery in Alabama: The Journal of Augustus Benners, 1850-1885 with his wife, Virginia Linden. The book, a chronicle of more than three decades in the life of a plantation owner in ante- and postbellum Alabama, was published in July 2007 by Mercer University Press.

Bridge supportsGeoffrey Orsak, School of Engineering, talked with CBS-11 TV and CBS News’ “The Early Show” Aug. 3, 2007, about the United States’ crisis-level backlog of structurally deficient bridges.

Tony Pederson, Journalism, discussed the ramifications of media mogul Rupert Murdoch’s recent purchase of The Wall Street Journal with SMU News Aug. 5, 2007.

Anne Peterson, DeGolyer Library, spoke with U.S. News & World Report about controversies surrounding the work of Civil War photographer Mathew Brady for the magazine’s July 2, 2007 cover story, “Secrets of the Civil War.” In addition, she gave a presentation on “Alexander Gardner and the Photographically Illustrated Book” to the Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing (SHARP) at its annual conference in Minneapolis July 11-14, 2007.

Kamal Saggi, Economics, has been named Dedman Distinguished Collegiate Professor of Economics.

SMU Panhellenic has been awarded the National Panhellenic Conference Progress award for campuses with 6-10 chapters for the 2005-2007 biennium. The honor is presented to one college Panhellenic that “has shown significant strides related to member education, new member programming, recruitment, and scholarship.”

Dallas immigration rallyHarold Stanley, Political Science, spoke with Mercedes Olivera of The Dallas Morning News about immigration issues and Latino voters for the July 8, 2007 edition.

Rev. Page A. Thomas, Bridwell Library, was the subject of an article in The Dallas Morning News July 21, 2007, recognizing his 46 years with Bridwell — the longest term of service in a single posting for any Methodist minister.

Gregory Warden, Art History, and his work at an ancient Etruscan settlement in Poggia Colla, Italy, were the subjects of a Robert Miller column in the Aug. 12, 2007 edition of The Dallas Morning News.

Jerry White, Caruth Institute for Entrepreneurship, discussed how the credit crunch is affecting small businesses with The Dallas Morning News Aug. 11, 2007.

Matthew Wilson, Political Science, spoke with Reuters in June 2007 about the Religious Right and Jerry Falwell’s legacy, and with The Dallas Morning News about Tom Leppert’s mayoral victory in the June 17, 2007 edition.

August 17, 2007|For the Record|
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