Careers in Alternative Dispute Resolution: A Career Symposium – Nov. 30

Join us November 30th for Careers in Alternative Dispute Resolution: A Career Symposium.

This one-day event will provide a great opportunity for participants to narrow their career track, prepare for their job search and establish professional relationships! This event is open to anyone interested in learning more about careers in ADR. Please RSVP by November 26.

Symposium Agenda

8:30 a.m. Networking Breakfast
8:45 a.m. “You are the CEO of your Career”
Dr. Greta Davis
9:30 – 11:00 a.m. Opening Session Panel: Career
Opportunities in ADR Across Sectors
11:15 – 12:15 p.m. Breakout Sessions
Resume Writing – Dr. Bob Barner
Maximizing Social Media for Your Success – Dr. Greta Davis & Dr. John Potter
Embracing Your Career Potential – Jessica Lunce
12:15 – 1:15 p.m. Lunch
1:15 – 2:45 p.m. Maximizing Your Success In… Breakout Sessions
Org Development – Dr. Bob Barner
Independent Practice – Prof. Tom Hartsell & Prof. Angela Mitakidis
Community & Peacebuilding – Dr. Betty Snyder
3:00 – 4:00 p.m. Developing Your Elevator Pitch
Dr. Bob Barner
4:10 – 5:00 p.m. Closing Session

Stay tuned for full agenda and session descriptions!

How to Make a Good (and Bad) Apology

SMU Dispute Resolution professor John Potter recently sat down with Justin Martin of KERA to discuss apologies and why are sometimes so difficult to make.

KERA News by Justin Martin

We’ve all made mistakes — it’s a part of being human. Apologizing for those mistakes is part of being human, too, but it’s not always easy.

We’ve seen an avalanche of apologies and pseudo-apologies made in the last few months — think Harvey Weinstein or Al Franken or, closer to home, Congressman Joe Barton.

SMU professor John Potter is an expert in dispute resolution and conflict management. He says to deliver an effective apology means considering what the person needs to hear rather than what you want to say.

“For most people when they apologize, they’re apologizing for themselves, saying they what want to say,” he says. “The key to an effective apology is saying what the person you’re apologizing to needs to hear — very different perspective.”

He says that disconnect can also lead to a bad, or ineffective, apology.

“We’re pretty sensitive to something when it doesn’t sound right and we just turn away from that person, when in fact, what that person really wants more than anything else is to be engaged, to be connected to the person they’re expressing regret to, so their relationship improves,” he says.

Potter says it’s easy to use an apology the wrong way and make things worse.

On how social media has changed the apology: “Social media changes everything when it comes to apology. Think of it this way: Imagine I write a book, it goes on a library shelf, and a hundred years from now, someone can find that book and read what I said. On the internet and in social media, that apology lasts forever and ever and ever, so if you don’t get the words in order correctly, if your words are not clear, if you’re ambiguous, then you have set yourself so far back you can’t recover. Clarity in a social media apology is paramount.”

On when you should make a face-to-face apology: “You should make a face-to-face apology when the relationship matters to you. If you’re my friend and we’ve been friends most of our lifetime, and I’ve done something harmful to you, this is not the time to send a text message. On the other hand, if we happen to work in the same building and I parked in your parking place and you’re mad at me, OK, a text message apology is just fine.”

On cultural differences in the apology: “There are cultural differences. Here is what I will normally will do in my own work: If I’m creating, writing, coaching someone on apology in a different culture, I’ll try and find an advocate in the culture to work with me, so I can go back and forth with that person to make sure the context is correct, make sure the tone is correct and that it’s more effective.”

Race & Reconciliation Symposium – April 7th

Join us April 7th for the Race & Reconciliation Symposium, presented by Peace is Possible. 

The SMU Conflict Management and Dispute Resolution Center is partnering with Peace is Possible for this one-day event designed to educate and develop community leaders that are passionate about dismantling racial divisions within our society. Topics and activities include: presentations from academics and thought leaders, dialogue processes, and learning opportunities centered around the importance of personal narratives and how they enable common understanding within communities. Creating positive change starts with understanding the problems and a willingness to engage with them in meaningful ways. Many of the speakers live and work here in North Texas, and represent social justice efforts being carried out right here in DFW.

From the Peace is Possible website:
“The Symposium is designed to educate, motivate, and inspire positive change in the North Texas community. Participants will learn the importance of personal narratives as it relates to understanding the lived experiences of those individuals whose narratives are too often missing in history. Actionable ideas will be presented to help attendees begin to shift from consciousness awareness to being agents of positive change in their workplaces and communities. Participants will learn from thought leaders and academics, participate in dialogue processes, and, ultimately, have the opportunity to become peacemakers in our shared North Texas community.”

Registration for the event is $45, and includes a light breakfast and lunch. Come learn how to engage your community as a peacemaker, and create positive, equatable change at the Race & Reconciliation Symposium.

Continue reading Race & Reconciliation Symposium – April 7th