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Archives of Women of the Southwest Manuscripts

Christmas Greetings

The Ebby Halliday Papers contain 25 years of Christmas holiday greetings sent by Ebby and her husband Maurice Acers. These undated, paper postcards and folded cards are all 8 inches by 9 inches and feature a photograph of Ebby and Maurice from a special event or celebration that took place that year. The back of the cards deliver a joyful holiday message such as “Seasons Greetings”, “Merry Christmas”, “Happy Holidays”, and “Happy New Year”.

Some cards show the couple’s whimsical and humorous side.

In other years, they choose to celebrate their love and appreciation for the Lone Star State and the city of Dallas, which Ebby called home since 1938.

Some cards reveal their elegant side and penchant for dressing with style. Ebby’s humble beginnings working in hat shops and fine department stores set the stage for her reputation as one Dallas’ best dressed. Whether the photo was taken in Rome at an international real estate conference or at the foot of the stairs at their home on Preston Road, the cards conveyed the couple’s glamour and poise.

A few of the cards emphasize the couple’s commitment to the many causes they supported over the years, such as the Beautify Texas Council and the Clown Ministry. In one particular year, Ebby and Maurice chose not to include a photograph of themselves on the front, but rather a collage of their business and civic achievements. The interior of this card says, “Many symbols, crests, shields, letterheads, logos…but these are only the identifying marks of the organizations through which we have the most valuable heartwarming experience of all…friends like you.”

Contact Samantha Dodd, curator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing the collections. For access to these collections or to learn more about the women of the southwest, be sure to visit the DeGolyer Library and check out our books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and photographs.

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Archives of Women of the Southwest Manuscripts

Ebby’s Thanksgiving Wish

Ebby’s Thanks

Texas didn’t make Thanksgiving an official holiday until 1848. But in 1961, the Lone Star State became a special place in the holiday’s history, as home to the world’s only Thanksgiving shrine, known as Thanks-Giving Square.

Today, Thanks-Giving Square is a unique, interfaith, multicultural site and research center on a 3.5-acre site in the heart of downtown Dallas. It’s designed as a serene and uplifting meeting place, focusing on tolerance and mutual understanding–ideas which Ebby believed in deeply. It seeks to promote gratitude among all people.

Promotional pamphlet for the Center of World Thanksgiving

Designed by renowned architect Philip Johnson and opened to the public in 1977, the site includes a chapel with a stained-glass ceiling, an exhibit hall, a ring of thanks, a bell tower, fountains and green space.

A portion of an advertisement used by TU Electric to commemorate Thanksgiving, depicting a rendering of Thanks-Giving Square, 1996

Ebby Halliday was involved with Thanks-Giving Square Foundation between 1995 to 2000 and guided several major initiatives, such as the expansion of the square from 1 acre to 3 acres and the installation of three monoliths honoring the history of Thanksgiving in the World, Nation, and Texas. In 1997, former President George W. Bush, who was governor at the time, came to dedicate the Texas Monolith. During her tenure as Thanksgiving Square Foundation’s first female Board President, she supported the installation of a 14-foot diameter, vertical ring, covered in gold-leaf, also designed by Philip Johnson. The Ring of Thanks was opened in a public ceremony in May 1996 as an “emblem of gratitude in the place of praise”.

Promotional flier for the World Thanksgiving Celebration in 1996 shows Ebby standing in the Ring of Thanks

Project archivist Krishna Shenoy will be working on processing the Ebby Halliday papers thanks to a generous gift of the Ebby Halliday foundation, to preserve and make accessible the work of the first lady of real estate.

Contact Samantha Doddcurator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing the collections. For access to these collections or to learn more about the women of the southwest, be sure to visit the DeGolyer Library and check out our books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and photographs.

 

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Archives of Women of the Southwest Manuscripts

Ebby Halliday Sings

Ebby with ukulele FWST
Ebby with ukulele Fort Worth Star-Telegram, 1987

Almost as famous as Ebby Halliday was Ebby Halliday’s ukulele. Whether she was the recipient of an award or welcoming a new class of real estate agents to Ebby Halliday, Inc., Ebby channeled charm and humor through her ukulele. She had a penchant for changing lyrics to well known songs to suit her topic and audience. She assured the audience “You know I really can’t play the ukulele or sing, but it helps to have a  shtick, everybody needs a shtick.”

She rewrote the lyrics to well-known songs of the time and drew inspiration from songbooks such as the Community Sing Session songbooks which provided a collection of songs for group singing for all occasions. These community songs had a simple chord structure, a melody that was recognizable, simple rhythm and a memorable chorus. Ebby would take classics and make them her own by changing the lyrics to suit her audience.

Community Sing Session Cover
Community Sing Session Cover
Community Sing Session inside
Community Sing Session inside

She used the tune to “Happy Days Are Here Again” to celebrate the economic impact of low interest rates, Fannie Mae loans, and eager homebuyers. The songs weren’t always the same. They changed over the years and with the times. Listen to Ebby sing “Happy Days Here, Again” (timecode 1:26) to a group of real estate agents in training.

Happy Days Are Here Again
Happy Days Are Here Again

She even took the popular song “I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing” most famously known as a Coca-Cola commercial during the 1980s and used it to promote Ebby Halliday’s Relocation services, known as RELO.

RELO Coke Song
RELO Coke Song

Ebby used the Ragtime-era song “Five Foot Two and Eyes of Blue” to promote the town of Irving as the place to be.

Five Foot Two
Five Foot Two

Ebby’s collection of songbooks includes this one by Pinky Hull who was a Ragtime piano player and magician. It folds out to reveal the lyrics to over 50 popular songs such as “Light of the Silvery Moon” and “Won’t You Come Home Bill Bailey”. Ebby’s magic was knowing how effective a funny lyric, a familiar tune, and the occasional off-beat note could be in winning over admirers in business and in friendship.

Pinky Hull songbook
Pinky Hull songbook

Project archivist Krishna Shenoy will be working on processing the Ebby Halliday papers thanks to a generous gift of the Ebby Halliday foundation, to preserve and make accessible the work of the first lady of real estate.

Contact Samantha Doddcurator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing the collections. For access to these collections or to learn more about the women of the southwest, be sure to visit the DeGolyer Library and check out our books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and photographs.

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Archives of Women of the Southwest Exhibits Manuscripts

One foot in front of the other…

Ribbons, Races, and Research Forty Years of the Susan G. Komen Foundation 1982-2022 (1)
Ribbons, Races, and Research Forty Years of the Susan G. Komen Foundation 1982-2022 exhibit banner

 

Forty years ago, one sister made a promise to another, that she would end the silence around breast cancer; raise money for research; and to one day cure breast cancer for good. This was what Nancy Brinker promised to her sister Susan Goodman Komen who died of breast cancer in 1980. In 1982, Nancy had put her formidable fund-raising talents to work and established the Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation. The Foundation also awarded its first research grant for $28,000 to Dr. Gary Spitzer at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. the first Race for the Cure® took place in Dallas, TX in 1983 with 800 participants.

Just four years after Susan passed away from breast cancer, Nancy found herself in the same situation. Brinker received her breast cancer diagnosis in 1984 which continued to motivate her to seek treatment, spread the word, and continue to search for a cure. October 1986 was the first Breast Cancer Awareness Month; every October since has served as an annual campaign to raise awareness about the impact of breast cancer.

Brinker turned the Susan G. Komen for the Cure into the most influential health charity in the country and arguably the world. Its pink ribbon is an iconic a symbol of hope everywhere. Each year, millions of people worldwide take part in Race for the Cure events. To date, the Susan G. Komen Foundation has “invested more than $3.3 billion in groundbreaking research, community health outreach, advocacy and programs in more than 60 countries” and “helped reduce deaths from breast cancer by 40 percent between 1989-2016.”

Now on display outside of Hillcrest Hall for the month of October 2022: Ribbons, Races and Research: Forty Years of the Susan G. Komen Foundation 1982-2022. This exhibit chronicles the establishment of the foundation and its impact around the globe on breast cancer awareness and research.

Housed in the Archives of Women of the Southwest at the DeGolyer Library, the Susan G. Komen Foundation records comprise: papers, photographs, clippings, company publications, awards, and artifacts along with an additional terabyte of digital video, photograph, and document files.

Contact Samantha Doddcurator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing the collections. For access to these collections or to learn more about the women of the southwest, be sure to visit the DeGolyer Library and check out our books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and photographs.

In October, think pink!

Pink ribbon pin
Pink ribbon Komen Race for the Cure pin
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Archives of Women of the Southwest

The Only Woman in the Room

Ebby group, Great Falls Tribune
Ebby group, Great Falls Tribune

What one thing is not like the others? Could it be the only woman in the room? This portrait was published in the Great Falls Tribune “Montana’s Best News Gatherer” on September 23, 1957. It was taken at the pre-convention barbeque mixer for the 10th Annual convention of the Montana Association of Realtors. Dallas real estate businesswoman, Ebby Halliday, attended as the Dallas President of the Women’s Council of the National Association of Real Estate Boards and was the principal speaker addressing the topic of “”Women and Real Estate”. Her long career was still in its nascent phase. She had been in the real estate business twelve years and was somewhat of a novelty–owning a company that was earning $3 million annually. As President of WAC, Ebby was invited to many state conventions and educational seminars.

Ebby was working during a time when women were not legally permitted to obtain a mortgage without a male cosigner. Women could sell houses, but could not borrow money to own one until the passage of the The Equal Credit Opportunity Act of 1974, which was a turning point for women and their financial futures.

The four "M'"s of Real Estate
The four “M'”s of Real Estate

Ebby recognized this chasm of opportunity and her early speeches emphasized the “The Four M’s” as she called them–Merchandising, Message, Mobility, and Mental Attitude. She focused on the work and business of selling properties, delivering the information from a decidedly gender neutral way. She referred to herself as a “salesman”.

Speech - Sales and Marketing Executives, Wichita Falls, 1973. Ebby Halliday Acers Papers
Speech – Sales and Marketing Executives, Wichita Falls, 1973. Ebby Halliday Acers Papers

Just a decade later, Ebby’s 1973 speech for sales and marketing executives acknowledged the changing times and roles of women by promoting themes such as “Women power is buying power”,  “Women power is persuasion power,” and pronounced the greatest new market trend–“Species Female, Consumer”.

Speech - Sales and Marketing Executives, Wichita Falls, 1973. Ebby Halliday Acers Papers
Speech – Sales and Marketing Executives, Wichita Falls, 1973. Ebby Halliday Acers Papers

If being the only woman in the room speaks to you, check out Phaidon Publishing’s most recent publication “The Only Woman” by Immy Humes, which documents pioneering women through 100 photographs of a lone woman among men, just like the portrait of Ebby.

Project archivist Krishna Shenoy will be working on processing the Ebby Halliday papers thanks to a generous gift of the Ebby Halliday foundation, to preserve and make accessible the work of the first lady of real estate.

Contact Samantha Dodd, curator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing the collections. For access to these collections or to learn more about the women of the southwest, be sure to visit the DeGolyer Library and check out our books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and photographs.

Categories
Archives of Women of the Southwest Manuscripts

There’s a Doctor in the House…

Friends of the Anita Nañez Martinez Recreation Center logo
Friends of the Anita Nañez Martinez Recreation Center logo

Anita Nanez Martinez was born in Dallas, Texas on December 8, 1925, the fifth of six children born to Jose and Anita Nanez. She lived in the Dallas neighborhood known as “Little Mexico”. From her early childhood, Martinez demonstrated a passion for community advocacy and volunteerism. At the age of 14, she led her first campaign, collecting signatures for the pavement of Pearl Street in “Little Mexico.” She was the first member of her family to graduate from high school and attended courses at SMU’s Dallas College, a downtown extension program popular in the 1930-40s. She married Alfred Martinez, of the El Fenix restaurants, in 1946, and together the couple raised four children: Al Joseph, Steve, Priscilla, and Rene.

Anita Martinez with J. Erik Johnson holding banner "Dallas All-America City"
Anita Martinez with J. Erik Johnson holding banner “Dallas All-America City”

Her passion for her community and improving West Dallas led others to nominate her for a spot-on the city council.  In 1969, she was the first Mexican American elected to the Dallas City Council and the first Mexican American woman elected to a city council in a major city.  Anita served on the council from 1969-1973. During her time in office she fought to build a recreation center for West Dallas and pushed for numerous urban improvements, including new library branches and street repairs in low-income neighborhoods. In 1975, a recreation center was built in West side of Dallas. This center was the birthplace of the Anita N. Martinez Ballet Folklorico (ANMBF), an organization which sought to display the customs of Mexican dance, and to give children the opportunity to learn and develop pride in themselves and their culture. In 1990, ANMBF produced its first season of professional dances employing dancers trained in Mexico. ANMBF is considered the largest professional Ballet Folklorico Company in the United States. In 2020, the company celebrated its 45th year.

Letter from President George H.W. Bush, 1990

Also, in 1990, the Anita N. Martinez recreation center went through a $1.968 million-dollar expansion, tripling the center’s size. This expansion allowed for expanded educational, vocational, cultural, and recreational opportunities. Funding for the expansion came from a 1985 capital bond campaign. Martinez and the Ballet Folklorico danced and campaigned across the city, gathering 70,000 signatures in a petition drive.

This year, at its commencement ceremonies on May 14th, Southern Methodist University presented the honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree to Anita N. Martinez, honoring her dedication to enriching the civic and cultural life of the city.

“A Tex-Mex Solute to Hispanic Culture” poster, May 7, 1989

The Anita Martinez papers held in the Archives of Women of the Southwest are comprised primarily of manuscripts, newspaper clippings, letters, photographs, and ephemera concerning Anita Martinez’ efforts to build Ballet Folklorico. A substantial portion of the collection also concerns her activities as a Dallas civic leader, first U.S. Mexican American councilwoman, Republican party activist, and founder of the Anita N. Martinez Recreation Center. Correspondence to figures such as George H. W. Bush, Anne Richards, Henry Cisneros, Ross Perot, Stanley Marcus, and others are prevalent throughout the collection. A large and detailed scrapbook for the years 1965 to 1972 chronicles her term as a Dallas city council member and her appointment by President Nixon to The National Center for Voluntary Action.

Contact Samantha Dodd, curator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing the collections. For access to these collections or to learn more about the women of the southwest, be sure to visit the DeGolyer Library and check out our books, manuscripts, pamphlets, and photographs.

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Archives of Women of the Southwest Exhibits

On the road across Texas…

First Day of the Trip (Greenville-Dallas-Waco)
First Day of the Trip (Greenville-Dallas-Waco)

Needing some inspiration for traveling this summer? Then look no further than in the archives! From maps to travel guides, postcards to posters, diaries to scrapbooks, there are a variety of resources to guides your plans. So plug in that hybrid vehicle, and grab something to take notes. For those looking to venture down to the coast, then this Texas Album – Start Greenville, provides the perfect trip itinerary.

“Lib” and Glen started out their summer travels in Greenville, Texas in June 1922. The first leg of their journey included stops in Dallas, Hillsboro (for lunch) before they spent the night in Waco. This travel album comprises many photographs and annotations by the creator, postcards, maps, and small ephemera. While in Dallas they explored the Fair Grounds, the Jefferson and various streets in town.

The second leg of the trip took them to Austin, where for two days they visited the Capitol grounds, and the law building at the University of Texas.

Scene at Deep Eddy, Austin
Scene at Deep Eddy, Austin

They describe the scene at Deep Eddy as “one of Austin’s good swimming holes.” After Austin, the third leg of their trip brought them to San Antonio (after passing through Buda, San Marcos, and New Braunfels) where they spent another two days. “Lib” and Glen explored various swimming holes, fishing, and did some sightseeing. They saw missions, the Alamo, and Brackenridge Park. While in town they stayed in the Gunter Hotel. The Gunter opened on November 20, 1909, on the site of the earlier Mahncke Hotel. The hotel was built by the San Antonio Hotel Company and named for Jot Gunter, a local rancher and real estate developer who was one of its financiers.

4th leg of the trip
4th leg of the trip

The fourth leg of the trip took the couple through Karnes City, Kennedy, Cuero, Yorktown, Victoria, and Edna. However, a muddy spot in the road caused a traffic jam. “Cars stuck to the rear of us; cars stuck ahead of us. Nothing to do but sit in the car until daylight.” After getting unstuck, they arrived in Houston. In addition to images of their muddy ride, photographs of this leg of the journey show various scenes of Rice University including the main building, the Power building, and the boy’s dormitory.

Finally, the last leg of the road trip brought “Lib” and Glen to Galveston. They drove around the sea wall, and participated in the Crystal Plunge. They swam, they fished, and enjoyed the sites and scenes of Galveston.

Bathing Girl Revue, Galveston
Bathing Girl Revue, Galveston
Crystal Plunge
Crystal Plunge

 

 

 

"Lib" and Glen
“Lib” and Glen

 

This album is one of many featured in the exhibition “Send Me a Postcard! Women on the Road across 19th-20th Century America,” which examines women motorists/automobilists and their travels across the country.

Contact Samantha Dodd, curator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing these materials. “Send me a Postcard! Women on the road across 19th-20th century America” will be on display in the Hillcrest exhibit hall through August 2022. View additional materials in the companion digital exhibit. The DeGolyer continues to expand our digitization efforts, adding new content weekly. We have thousands of items digitized and searchable in our digital collections with many thousands more

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Archives of Women of the Southwest Exhibits Manuscripts

Send me a postcard!

Send me a postcard exhibit banner
Send me a postcard exhibit banner

 

On exhibition this summer in the DeGolyer Library’s Hillcrest Hall Send me a postcard! Women on the road across 19th-20th century America examines women motorists/automobilists and their travels across the country. The concept for this exhibit developed from a series of blog posts written over the course of a few summers. “That’s Where the West Begins…” featured the Elizabeth Dalrymple manuscript. Filled with humorous adventures, Elizabeth’s narrative describes her road trip from Pennsylvania to Colorado and back with her girlfriends Lillian, Aldine, Ethel in June 1940. The follow-up post “On the Road Again” featured the Margaret Burkhalder’s scrapbook, which contains a travel journal and diary, postcards, clippings, programs, and ephemera from a five-week trip from Buffalo, New York to the Midwest and Western United States and Canada with a group of nurses from Buffalo General Hospital, June 11 to July 14, 1936.

The open road stood as a symbol of freedom. It offered women means of exploration and an opportunity to become rugged adventurers. Automobiles started to appear at the same time women were striving for autonomy in the home and in politics. Women’s growing independence and the suffrage movement coincided with the rise of the motoring. To set out on the road required a sense of adventure and determination, an ability to cope with at times harsh conditions, and the know-how to troubleshoot repairs or problem-solve.

A woman’s world tour in a motor cover
A woman’s world tour in a motor cover

Highlights from the exhibit include: Harriet White Fisher’s (1865-1939) A woman’s world tour in a motor. Harriet White Fisher Andrew was an American known for being the first woman to circle the globe in a Locomobile. Alice Huyler Ramsey’s (1886-1983) Veil, duster and tire iron provides a description of an automobile trip from New York to San Francisco. Alice Huyler Ramsey was the first woman to drive an automobile across the United States from coast to coast, a feat she completed on August 7, 1909. Ramsey became the first woman inducted into the Automotive Hall of Fame on October 17, 2000.

Newly acquired materials from the DeGolyer can also been seen in this exhibit. Elizabeth Albertha Taylor’s Western Wonderland [privately printed account of a western trip], 1903 recounts a western journey of a group of women beginning in Denver with sightseeing. The group then made their way to Manitou; Cheyenne Canyon for a “botany expedition”; Pike’s Peak; Garden of the Gods; and Glenwood Springs where they celebrated Fourth of July. They went on to stay at Yellowstone. Her account is an illustrated diary which includes many photographs of scenery and towns, as well as photos of the group and their activities.

“Safety First on Your Trip to California”
“Safety First on Your Trip to California”

Henrietta Heacock’s Safety First on Your Trip to California was created for Elisabeth by Henrietta, as a present for a girl’s trip by train to California. The entire book was compiled from different periodicals’ humorous clippings, cartoons, and illustrations, combined to form chapters. Some of the chapter headings: “The Way to Travel,” “The Gateway to the West,” “Are You an Optimist.” The album allowed Elisabeth (and future owners) to enjoy contemporary “railroad humor” while passing the time. It is a valuable reflection of railroad culture in American life.

Contact Samantha Dodd, curator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing these materials. “Send me a Postcard! Women on the road across 19th-20th century America” will be on display in the Hillcrest exhibit hall through August 2022. View additional materials in the companion digital exhibit. The DeGolyer continues to expand our digitization efforts, adding new content weekly.

Categories
Archives of Women of the Southwest Manuscripts

International Women’s Day

International Women’s Day

American Women on the Move, program cover, 1977
American Women on the Move, program cover, 1977

The National Women’s Conference, held in Houston from November 18 – 21, 1977, was the largest political conference of women in the United States since the Women’s Rights Convention in Seneca Falls, New York in 1848. Approximately 2,000 voting delegates from fifty states and six territories formulated and passed a National Plan of Action, which would detail recommendations to improve the lives of women.

The Conference proposed nonbinding recommendations to help remove sex barriers and better utilize women’s contributions. Participants discussed and debated twenty-six major topics including the ERA, abortion, lesbian rights, child care, minority women, homemakers, battered women, education, rape, health, and a cabinet-level women’s department. There are many collections in the Archives of Women of the Southwest that document the National Women’s Conference and female political activism during the 1970s and beyond.

Child care for the National Women's Conference
Child care for the National Women’s Conference

 

 

The Sylvia Benenson National Women’s Conference collection is comprised of programs, delegate lists, brochures, articles, and printed materials related to the Women’s Convention held in Houston, Texas in November of 1977.

From a secretary at Texas Instruments to Senior Vice President and one of the seven co-founders of Scientific Communications, Kay Cole Walker enjoyed a successful career and created opportunities for many women and minorities. She was a dedicated volunteer who focused her energies on women’s issues. She served a past president of the Women’s Southwest Federal Credit Union, Women’s Issues Network, and served on the boards of the Women’s Center of Dallas, the Texas Abortion Rights Action League, the North Dallas National Organization for Women, and The Dallas Heritage Foundation.

 

The Kay Cole Walker papers consist of clippings, magazines, photographs, correspondence, and promotional material details Ms. Cole’s active involvement in feminist issues and the women’s rights movement. Included here are papers from the Women’s Southwest Federal Credit Union, Women’s Issue Network, Our Friend’s Place, NARAL, TARAL, NOW, and Dallas Women’s Foundation, as well as clippings detailing the 1977 National Women’s Conference in Houston. Ms. Cole also collected material on issues of abortion and the ERA. A portion of the collection contains correspondence with Ann Richards and other local elected officials.

Claire Cunningham was a resident of Dallas, Texas who was an advocate for the rights and education of women and children. Her papers include publications, reports, pamphlets, clippings, meeting and seminar notes, text of speeches and sermons, and other documents related to her involvement as a leader (including roles as chairman and president) and member in the following organizations: Dallas Alliance Education Task Force (1975-1978), which includes materials concerning the desegregation of Dallas schools; Dallas Commission on the Status of Women (1975-1985); Dallas Independent School District Task Force for Educational Excellence (1975); Goals for Dallas Elementary and Secondary Education Achievement Committee (1977-1983); National Women’s Conference/International Women’s Year (1975-1978); Parent Teacher Association (PTA) at the national, state, and local levels (1975-1979); and the United Methodist Church North Texas Conference Commission on the Status and Role of Women (1972-1991).

Profile of the Dallas Woman, 1976 report of the Dallas Commission on the Status of Women
Profile of the Dallas Woman, 1976 report of the Dallas Commission on the Status of Women

Phyllis Tucker, the 2010 honoree of the Veteran Feminists of America’s The Gender Agenda: Beyond Borders program, entered the Women’s Movement in 1976. She served as president of the Texas chapter of the National Organization for Women in 1980 and 1990. Ms. Tucker worked as the first female chemist in the Houston petroleum industry, and she quickly became an advocate for women in the Houston area. She was instrumental in the development of the Houston Area Women’s Center, a women’s shelter, and WIRES, a call center for abused women. She also served on Houston’s Women’s Rights Coordinating Council.

Contact Samantha Dodd, curator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing these materials. The DeGolyer Library awards the Ruth P. Morgan grants to encourage work in women’s history or political history.

 

 

The DeGolyer continues to expand our digitization efforts, adding new content weekly. We have thousands of items digitized and searchable in our digital collections. Be sure to browse our holdings to find more letters, photographs, manuscripts, imprints, art, and audio/video.

Join the Coalition of Grass Roots Women
Join the Coalition of Grass Roots Women
Categories
Archives of Women of the Southwest Manuscripts

Remember the Ladies… Adlene Harrison 1923-2022

Scrapbook page: Our Wonder Woman
Scrapbook page: Our Wonder Woman

Remember the Ladies…

Adlene Harrison

1923-2022

On Saturday, February 19th, 2022, Dallas lost a leading lady. Adlene Harrison, the first woman mayor of Dallas, Texas passed away at the age of 98. Harrison was a member of the Dallas City Council from 1973 to 1977. She was the city’s mayor pro tem when she was appointed acting mayor in 1976 to complete the term of Wes Wise, who resigned to run for Congress. The appointment made her the first Jewish woman to serve as mayor of a major U.S. city.

Clipping: "New Leadership Role, April 10, 1975
Clipping: “New Leadership Role, April 10, 1975

 

 

While on the city council, Harrison co-sponsored an ordinance to establish a city environmental committee and supported a strict air pollution ordinance. In addition, she was a member of the National League of Cities’ Steering Committee for Environmental Quality. As mayor, she continued her work for the environment, as well as encouraging legislation for historic preservation in the city.

 

 

 

 

 

Environmental News, September 6, 1977
Environmental News, September 6, 1977

 

 

 

Harrison’s passion laid in environmental issues, developing Dallas’ mass transit and in women’s reproductive-rights. Harrison was appointed an Environmental Protection Agency regional administrator in 1977, responsible for directing the EPA’s anti-pollution efforts in five states. She held this position until 1981, when she became chair of the Dallas Area Rapid Transit Authority Board.

 

 

 

 

Letter from Sarah Weddington, September 21, 1978
Letter from Sarah Weddington, September 21, 1978

 

Harrison’s other civic involvements have included work on the boards of the Women’s Museum, the Women’s Center of Dallas, the Dallas Jewish Coalition, the Metropolitan YWCA and the Dallas Arboretum.

The Adlene Harrison papers held in the Archives of Women of the Southwest comprise scrapbooks, correspondence, clippings, speeches and remarks, and ephemera. These materials document her career and contributions to the city of Dallas, as well as to larger environmental issues.

 

 

 

 

 

Contact Samantha Dodd, curator of the Archives of Women of the Southwest for additional information or assistance with accessing these materials. The DeGolyer Library awards the Ruth P. Morgan grants to encourage work in women’s history or political history.

The DeGolyer continues to expand our digitization efforts, adding new content weekly. We have thousands of items digitized and searchable in our digital collections. Be sure to browse our holdings to find more letters, photographs, manuscripts, imprints, art, and audio/video.

Editorial Cartoon, Mayor Adlene
Editorial Cartoon, Mayor Adlene